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Air France Plane down

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posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:50 PM
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Partial list of confirmed passengers:

Sorry , it was just iddued at folhaonline. its in portuguese.

The Brazilian air force has 01 Hercules C 130, Plus 5 other airplanes
03 helicopters, and 3 vesels searching the area.

One of the passengers is Prince Pedro de Orleans e Bragança the heir of the brazilian crown. ( descendant of Don Pedro 2 )

Other high top executives from Michelan and Big brazilian companies on the plane also.


Adriana Francisco Sluijs, 40, da área de comunicação corporativa da Petrobras
Ana Carolina Rodrigues, 28, integrante da ONG Viva Rio
Andrés Suárez Montes, 38, engenheiro espanhol que trabalhava no Brasil
Antonio Gueiros, diretor de informática da Michelin
Bianca Machado Cotta
Carlos Eduardo Macário de Melo, recém-casado com Bianca
Christin Pieraerts, funcionária da unidade Paris da Michelin
Deise Possamai, 34, funcionária da prefeitura de Criciúma
Erich Heine, presidente da ThyssenKrupp CSA - Companhia Siderúrgica do Atlântico
Giovanni Batista Lenzi, deputado da Província Autônoma de Trento
Gustavo Henrique Brito dos Santos, 30, advogado carioca
Gustavo Peretti, 30, brasileiro, funcionário da petrolífera norueguesa StatoilHydro.
Harald Maximillian Winner, 44, alemão que iria providenciar documentos para se casar
Izabela Maria Furtado Kestler, professora de alemão da UFRJ
Isis, francesa, mulher de José Ronnel Amorim
João Marques da Silva Filho, 67, gerente de interface do Estaleiro Atlântico Sul
José Ronnel Amorim, casado com Isis
Juliana Aquino, 29, cantora, mora na Alemanha e passava férias com a família em Brasília
Leonardo Veloso Dardengo, 31, oceanógrafo e doutorando da Coppe/UFRJ
Letícia Chem, 36, gerente de roaming internacional da operadora Oi
Luigi Zortea, prefeito de Canal San Bovo, em Trento (Itália)
Luis Cláudio Monlevad, 48, funcionário da empresa de tubulações Saint-Gobain
Luiz Roberto Anastácio, presidente da Michelin para a América do Sul
Kristian Berg Andersen, 37, norueguês, também funcionário da petrolífera norueguesa StatoilHydro.
Marcela Marques Pellizzon, 29, geóloga; viajava para fazer curso na Noruega e era funcionária da petrolífera norueguesa StatoilHydro.
Marcelo Parente, 38, chefe de gabinete do prefeito do Rio, Eduardo Paes (PMDB)
Marcos Mendonça, diretor de manganês da Vale
Mulher de Marcelo Parente, cujo nome não foi confirmado
Martin, 29, médico alemão em férias no Brasil
Nelson Marinho Filho, 40, mecânico de engrenagens
Octávio Augusto Ceva Antunes, professor do Instituto de Química da UFRJ
Pablo Dreyfus, 38, argentino integrante da ONG Viva Rio
príncipe Pedro Luis de Orleans e Bragança, 26, descendente de dom Pedro 2º
Rino Zandonai, diretor da Associazione Trentini Nel Mondo
Roberto Corrêa Chem, 66, cirurgião plástico e professor universitário
Silvio Barbato, ex-diretor artístico da Orquestra Sinfônica do Teatro Nacional
Valnilzia Betler, 44, casada com um alemão
Vera Chem, 63, psicóloga, casada com Roberto Chem

[edit on 1-6-2009 by mrgiller]

[edit on 1-6-2009 by mrgiller]




posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:51 PM
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A plane that size just does not disappear think about all the people that would have phones on them no one phoned home strange sounds like Bermuda triangle stuf.


Unless you have a satellite phone (they are expensive and rare) you won't be calling anyone from a moving aircraft, at altitude, over the ocean. Those cell phone towers you see dotting your landscape... they are there for a reason. Mobile telephone service works via a network of antenna arrays on buildings, towers, etc. The dirty little secret is that each and every one of them is tied into a landline phone line. They don't send or receive from satellites and they can't function without a T1 telephone connection. In the rare case they aren't tied into the land phone system, and that is only in the case where they absolutely can't tap into a T1 line, they utilize short, microwave hops to the next cell site that DOES tie into the lines.

Those cell sites all have a certain capacity of calls/data they can handle... to much and you drop your call. They call have certain hand-off issues from antenna site to antenna site... no site to hand off too (most cell sites have a 5 to 10 mile operating radius), you drop your call. Most sites are designed to hand off at certain speeds (like moving automobiles), much faster (like a full-speed passenger aircraft) and you drop your call. Most cell sites point their antennas to the ground (to send and recieve calls on your handset) at along the horizon to the next send/receive tower). Each antenna has a very finite, very limited range. Once you are out of that antenna's range... you drop your call.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:52 PM
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You guys have to remember that airplanes traveling transoceanic are not on ATC Radar. They receive transoceanic clearances prior to crossing the ocean, and they are required to give position updates via their radio or ACARS (Aircraft communications addressing and reporting system).

ATC manages Oceanic traffic by utilizing those position reports and relaying any important altitude change or traffic problems via radio.


The Ocean is far to big too maintain a line of sight for onshore doppler.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:54 PM
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How come all the people on here posting who have had so called “premonitions” only post AFTER the event has happened?

It’s very annoying.

Mikey



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:54 PM
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First, how horribly sad for everyone with someone on board. And how tragic for those holding the babies and kids during the crash, heart breaking. True condolences.

Second, since this a conspiracy site, what could be a reason for a crash, right before summer, on Air France?

I'm in San Francisco CA and we seem to be hearing of a lot of French tourist catastrophes in the past few weeks. A tourist bus driver had a brain aneurysm while driving on a bridge. Several french tourists died and many were injured. And there were 2 other incidents... smaller, but notable and the common thread was that they were French tours each time. This is just in California. And the French do travel a lot. Prices are low now and they're not as bad off.

Did anyone see the cover of the Economist a couple of weeks ago? Maybe powers that be have it out for the French and the Brazilians, or are jealous?

timescorrespondents.typepad.com...

hmm.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:54 PM
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reply to post by larphillips
 


Hey this all sounds VERY familiar! I'm a telecommunications designer myself. I design cell networks for South California for SPrint Nextel,AT&T, Verizon etc.. , and yes you hit the nail on the head.

What field are you in?



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by Mikey84
 


Mikey, I just knew you were about to say that.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:03 PM
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Nationalities on board:

“The airline company identified the nationalities of the victims as two Americans, an Argentinean, an Austrian, a Belgian, 58 Brazilians, five British, a Canadian, nine Chinese, a Croatian, a Dane, a Dutch, an Estonian, a Filipino, 61 French, a Gambian, 26 Germans, four Hungarians, three Irish, one Icelandic, nine Italians, five Lebanese, two Moroccans, three Norwegians, two Polish, one Romanian, one Russian, three Slovakian, two Spanish, one Swedish, six Swiss and one Turk.”

Mikey

[edit on 1/6/2009 by Mikey84]



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:04 PM
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reply to post by cnm1976
 


Last plane destroyed by lightning was over 40 years ago, and that was because the plane's fuel tanks exploded.
Nowaday's EVERY airliner gets struck by lightning at least once every one or two years. The electrical charge is dissipated through the aircraft's skin and discharged out of it's extremities like the tail or the wing tips via the static dischargers.

The onboard electronics are VERY insulated from damage from these strikes, so unless a criminal act of negligence was committed on the onboard electrical system, it would not have shut down all the systems in the aircraft.

Even if the electronics were destroyed (which only happened on impact I'm sure), the Airbus has steam gauges as backup to maintain flight stability.


One simple thing to remember is that the columns of air above a storm cell are sufficient to tear and airplane apart. Many airliners have been shredded in the violent updrafts of storm cells. It is THIS reason they detour, not because of lightning strikes.

Secondly, onboard weather radar can not detect columns of rapidly moving air, unless there is a substantial moisture component to it.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:10 PM
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Originally posted by The Blind Watchmaker
reply to post by larphillips
 


I love your perspectives. Thanks for expanding the reality and bringing everything in to pure clarity.

Starred.



Thank you for your kind words.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:11 PM
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Brazilian Air Force Coronel Jorge Antônio Amaral said that he works with the possibility to find survivors, even though a remote possibility.

quote:

" We always have to work with the possibility of finding survivors, always. We can´t give up the search for people ",

The Brazilian Air Force has now 08 airplanes in the search. Three ships from the Brazilian Navy. Tonight at this moment two planes are using radar to try finding the emergency equipment from the Airbus. the planes also will use Infrared detectors that can be helpfull to identify wreckage or victms. there are 100 men working inn the operation, they belong the the Brazilian Air Force Elite Group.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:13 PM
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Originally posted by manbird12000
reply to post by larphillips
 


Hey this all sounds VERY familiar! I'm a telecommunications designer myself. I design cell networks for South California for SPrint Nextel,AT&T, Verizon etc.. , and yes you hit the nail on the head.

What field are you in?


LOL... same. I project manage network upgrades and build-outs for the various major carriers. My last project was for Sprint/Nextel and my current one is for AT&T.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:13 PM
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Originally posted by Mikey84
How come all the people on here posting who have had so called “premonitions” only post AFTER the event has happened?

It’s very annoying.

Mikey


As soon as I see a post beginning with "I had this weird dream" or "I had a vision" I skip right over it. Every time something major happens, they always pop up. Always after the fact.

Anyway, Im still looking for some confirmation that wreckage has been found, but none of the major news sources seem to be reporting it, and I can't read Portugese.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:14 PM
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They probably won’t find anything until the parts start to wash up on the shore of the South America or African coast.

They will find it. It’s just a matter of when.

Mikey


[edit on 1/6/2009 by Mikey84]



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:16 PM
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Originally posted by manbird12000
reply to post by cnm1976
 


Last plane destroyed by lightning was over 40 years ago, and that was because the plane's fuel tanks exploded.
Nowaday's EVERY airliner gets struck by lightning at least once every one or two years. The electrical charge is dissipated through the aircraft's skin and discharged out of it's extremities like the tail or the wing tips via the static dischargers.

The onboard electronics are VERY insulated from damage from these strikes, so unless a criminal act of negligence was committed on the onboard electrical system, it would not have shut down all the systems in the aircraft.


Check out my post around page 8 or do a Google search on positive lightning. Rare, but deadly... and aircraft aren't protected against it.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:19 PM
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When the air clears and we can get it, I'd like to see the passenger list. ~just sayin~



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by larphillips
 


Awesome, I just finished some AT&T cabinet upgrades for Arizona Maricopa area and Phoenix. I'm on the architectural side of it, do the field visits and site audits. We might actually know eachother... hehe, I'm Damien, worked for almost all the A&E cell companies here in southern cali,



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by larphillips
 


I'll check it out. Very interesting.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:31 PM
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“French president Nicolas Sarkozy has asked for assistance from US spy satellites in a bid to locate wreckage and try to discover how such a modern aircraft with state of the art communications and safety equipment could simply vanish.”

RTE News

Mikey



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:42 PM
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reply to post by Mikey84
 


The amount of time that has passed without the location of anything is spooky isn't it?

"vanish"?

That word alone is chilling... This was a large aircraft if it did plunge into the ocean it would have likely broken up on impact leaving debris and a huge possibly burning oil slick from the fuel, there are literally tons of materials that would be floating... Something should have been found by now...

Which leaves the question, what if they can't or do not find anything?

For the sake of the families of the victims on board I hope they find something soon.



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