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55 Killer Whales commited suicide?

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posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 12:59 AM
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55 Killer Whales commited suicide?


www.te legraph.co.uk

More than 50 whales were shot dead by authorities in South Africa yesterday. The 55 false killer whales, relatively small cetaceans about nine feet long that are actually members of the dolphin family, stranded themselves along around two miles of the shore at Kommetjie beach, near Cape Town.

Hundreds of volunteers gathered to try to save the animals, keeping them wet to reduce the stress they were suffering and with bulldozers used to push them gently back into the waters at high tide. But even though a few were successfully returned to the sea, they proceeded to beach themselves again a l
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 12:59 AM
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I saw this on the news this morning, and thought it would be worth mentioning here. I've read a thread about a while ago on ATS - it was a theory as to why animals behave strange. According to the news it is not uncommon for killer whales to kill themselves via beaching...but this many whales at once?

So I thought I would do a google search to see exactly how common killer whales suicide is. I found another news article about killer whales suicide: Over 55 stranded whales and dolphins have died after beaching themselves at Hamelin Bay, 10km north of Augusta, early this morning. (www.watoday.com.au...)

On 23 March 55 killer whales died in Hamelin Bay, Western Australia. This weekend another 55 killer whales died in Cape Town, South Africa. In both cases exactly 55?

Strange coinsidence.


What do you think?

www.te legraph.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 01:02 AM
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Actually it was 80 that got stranded at Hamelin bay.

Only 4 survived.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 01:05 AM
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Then this news article is faulty ---> www.watoday.com.au...



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 01:09 AM
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reply to post by Odette
 


Nope, it's correct it seems.

There were 80 that got stranded, 55 of which had already died before they got discovered.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 01:11 AM
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Man, this is happening more often it seems. I mean, I'm young so I could be wrong, but I've seen more of these strandings (and bigger groups at that) the last few years. Strange.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 01:11 AM
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Ahhh ok. Still think it is strange. But then again, it's a strange, strange world we live in, Master Jack!



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 01:20 AM
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The earth is slowing and it is messing up the internal migration system in animals/mammals.

That's why when the rescuers get them back out to sea, they just turn right back around and drift back in.

A good way to tell how much time we are losing each day/week/month..... Check your pc clock, which is synch'd automatically for you - and a battery operated wall clock - one that doesn't synch itself. After the first one to two weeks you'll be able to see a minute or two difference in the times.

I've been comparing mine for about four or so months. And right now my pc clock says 2:10 am - my wall clock says 2:06 - a four minute difference.

The moon causes the ocean tides - with everything changing/collapsing in/on and around the world, it is really doing a number on the animal's migration patterns.

Read up on the entire 2012/galactic alignment and that might shed some light on this subject - I believe it actually started in 2001 or 2008 - forget which but it will top out in 2012. Nasa is predicting it as "intense solar storms" but they should call it what it is - an alignment of the poles.

Earth had a magnetic alignment in 2001 - no big deal. But the one coming now is a total physical alignment.

This is having a huge effect on migration in the animals. It's not suicide per say - their internal systems are telling them to migrate a certain direction but because the poles are starting to slowly shift, it is screwing their navigation/destination up.

This is also playing in to the increase of weather lately as well - as the earth continues to slow, it is causing shelves to break loose and start to slide. I.e. earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, etc.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 01:21 AM
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Yeah, most of the time they are trying to catch seals and land creatures, and wind up beaching them selfs. Young whales tend to go of course and wind up beached.

This tends to happen a lot. Sad thing!



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 01:23 AM
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There is a theory that this is because sonar messes up these animals natural echolocation system.

I think it is because a transmittable disease is detected in a pod and the group kills itself off to limit the transition. These creatures are highly intelligent and social, I would wonder if they had all contracted something which they decided as a collective to eliminate instead of risking other pods.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 01:28 AM
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reply to post by Piranha
 


One or two whales/dolphins/etc and I would agree. But these are schools of whales/dolphins/etc.

Their migration is screwed up.

Here's a recent story where 200 beached themselves in Au - and in the end, 140 died.

WhalesBeached


Blame the pole shift.

Don't forget to strap on your crash helmet - it's only going to get worse.



[edit on 1-6-2009 by nomorecruelty]



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