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'Sexting' no worse than spin-the-bottle: study

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posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 11:20 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions




posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by rogerstigers
 



When you take or collect nude photos of young girls, a psychological threshold is broken that allows for similar behavior in the future. You can deny it until you're blue in the face, but those denials wouldn't be based on anything except probably your own perverted thinking.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by vcwxvwligen
 


Oh lordy!!! That means they'll send pictures of themselves naked when it's legal to do so!!!!!!

Awful. Just awful. Illegal.

But not really.

It's not like pedophiles are taking these pictures. It's other kids.

It's better they do this than going around selling their bodies.

[edit on 6/1/2009 by ravenshadow13]



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 11:59 PM
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I think everyone is missing the point here? This is not a legal issue it's a parenting one! Allowing the public policing of the private behavior of our children only opens doors to other things. Parents are responsible for what their kids can and can not do, not the public authority. Parents rely on the public education system far too much for this. A young person that participates in things like this is not a criminal, they are immature. Spend some time building a healthy relationship with your child so they want advice on these things from you, not their friends. I bet the kid that can openly discuss these issues with a parent are far less likely to make this mistake in life?

Young people today are no different then they ever were. There will always be a vehicle for their expression. Repressing this, or criminalizing it, surely is not a healthy solution? They too must learn by their mistakes like anyone else. These are not new problems, only new methods to old ones. Instead of criminalizing our children maybe we should be more focused on why they wish to participate in these activities? It's like the cook blaming the pot for the flavor of his soup!



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 12:05 AM
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reply to post by Zerbst
 


I think it stems from the suppression of sexuality in pre-teens and teens. I think it's a very important issue and as soon as they hit puberty, they shouldn't be expected to just ignore sex like it's not out there.

Because then things like this happen.

Or worse.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 12:22 AM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13
 


I agree. Rebelling is exactly what you get when you repress children! I went to both private and public schools in my youth. Private school was strict and repressive, but also considerably more violent and sexual than the less strict public schools. It was obvious to me, even as a child, what was wrong. You can't scare or beat it out of a kid. All you can do is build a trust with them and hope they come to you for guidance. But even in a perfect world children will make mistakes.

It's not about eradication, it's about minimization. Certainly not criminalization, that would be devastation! A citation for fornication in moderation is not a liberation in this nation of innovation! That would be a vacation of our inclination to make a proper justification of a delicate situation!

Sorry, I got a little carried away.

Peace.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 12:30 AM
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If a girl wants to send her boyfriend a picture of herself in the nude then I don't see the wrong with that.

Now if that boyfriend starts sending it to his friends then that is a problem. His friends sends it to their friends and they in turn sends them to their friends. They could potentially end up on an adults phone or put on the internet.

Sending it to the boyfriend or girlfriend should not be the crime. The crime should be distributing it to others, as that was not the intent of the person who took it.

I think they are trying to avoid the spread of this pictures. They are just going at it the wrong way.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 12:36 AM
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reply to post by jd140
 


Unfortunately, these kids lack the maturity to foresee the consequences and also, unfortunately, it is too tempting for the boyfriend to share with other people. What if the girl breaks up with him and he sends it to everyone out of spite or hurt? I know for a fact that this has happened and it caused the girl's suicide.

This practice is as similar to spin the bottle as murder is to a slap in the face.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 12:54 AM
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Originally posted by spellbound
reply to post by jd140
 


Unfortunately, these kids lack the maturity to foresee the consequences and also, unfortunately, it is too tempting for the boyfriend to share with other people. What if the girl breaks up with him and he sends it to everyone out of spite or hurt? I know for a fact that this has happened and it caused the girl's suicide.

This practice is as similar to spin the bottle as murder is to a slap in the face.


Thats why distributing it to those that the pictures were not intended for should be the crime. Punishing the person who sent them to the boyfriend or girlfriend is stupid as no one in the initial party is an adult (I would hope not anyways).

I don't think that its as innocent as spin the bottle, but as long as cell phones as cameras this is going to happen. Proper laws should be put in place to punish the mass distribution of these types of pictures.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 01:16 AM
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Originally posted by spellbound
reply to post by jd140
 



I don't think that its as innocent as spin the bottle, but as long as cell phones as cameras this is going to happen. Proper laws should be put in place to punish the mass distribution of these types of pictures.


Um, there are laws in place for child pornography.

This is not about the pictures it's about the act. Making criminals out of peoples private lives as if it was their business. What's next, texting distasteful jokes? Those that are in favor of big brother raising their kids should think twice about vague legislation that can umbrella many other activities not thought of originally. How about we just keep it simple and learn to be parents to our kids? That way we don't have to worry about all the intrusion into our personal lives!

Peace.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 01:25 AM
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reply to post by Zerbst
 



A 15 year old sends a nude picture to their 15 year old boy/girlfriend. That should not be considered distribution of child pornography.

But under current laws it can be seen as that.

That is why there needs to be a new law or an ammendment to the child pornography law that states the recipient is the one who can be held reliable for mass distribution of said pictures regardless of their age.

We can leave it to the parents to control such behavior, but it will continue unless the kids get their phones taken away from them. We all know that is very unlikely to happen.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 04:00 PM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13
 



Exactly -- mature, intelligent people trading personal pics is a lot better. I personally wouldn't do it, and I would advise other people against it (especially using digital devices), but it's way less damaging than if it were a kid.

Unless those kids were being recorded giving sexual favors, then apples and oranges.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by Zerbst
 


No, read the article, and the title of the thread. The article insinuates that sexting and playing spin the bottle present similar levels of risk, which is absolutely false.

The article also mentions a 20-year-old young man who sent naked pics of his girlfriend to the girl's family as a form of retribution. Young people cannot and should not be trusted to make decisions in the same manner as adults, regardless of how "innocent" their intentions.

Each investigation requires law enforcement -- and the courts -- to obtain copies of those pictures for their own "use."



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by jd140
 



The phone can get hacked, or someone could swipe it, or just steal the SIM card. Files can also be stolen off a phone using bluetooth or wifi. Cell phones are stolen all the time. You can also get a password and look at the phone's contents through the web without even having the phone physically present. The person who has the pics could also copy them to another medium thereby making them more accessible.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 04:25 PM
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reply to post by Zerbst
 



Sending a pic of yourself is not the same thing as telling a joke. Apples and oranges.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 04:38 PM
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I don't believe that this practice should be illegal and that teenagers should not be punished for it in certain situations.

I have friends and just some kids I know that do it who probably should not be doing it. Twelve-year-olds who have picture messaging capabilities will do that. Some just do it and mass distribute it on their own only expediting the process to more kids, some older and some younger. Teens sometimes send then as if they are sending "flood" messages. They almost have no value to these people, they just do it for reasons like peer pressure, popularity, trend, what have you. That isn't a crime, just being a really dumb teenager, not thinking about consequences.

My cousin went through his phone one day and showed me probably thirty different girls, some he barely knew, some ex-girlfriends, some he thought were from other schools, and some his very close friends. He just asked them for the pictures and he got them. He was maybe 14 at the time.

This isn't something that is easily controlled or regulated, and IMO it shouldn't be. It isn't child pornography, it is a willing distribution of personal images. Much like kids put images on Facebook or Myspace, you can take and use them just the same way. Except the kids are now taking these images to cellular devices because they can't really on Myspace or Facebook. Facebook has an active "porn cop" team, these phones don't.
Facebook
Another one on Facebook

These kids are just being kids, engaging in unregulated behavior because where they used to do it is now controlled and regulated. You know how us kids rebel


Having said that, I don't agree that this is a crime, it is not child pornography, and I agree with the ironically named Cummings. It is not as harmful as some of the games I have played or games kids will invent and play in the future, the less contact, the lower the pregnancy and drop out rates is how I see it. This coming from the county in my state with the highest teen pregnancy rates, these photos are a benefit which delay/halt underage/unprotected sex sometimes (they may not like what they see, pardon the humor). I don't want to see another pregnant twelve or fourteen-year-old girl and some dumb soon-to-be-dad in WalMart scraping it by on a low education and low-income. I'd rather have them be sexting.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by deadline527
 

[snip]

But yes he makes sense. Does anybody else think the word sexting is hilarious like I do ?

Mod Edit -

1b.) Profanity: You will not use profanity in our forums, and will neither post with language or content that is obscene, sexually oriented, or sexually suggestive nor link to sites that contain such content. You will also not use common alternative spellings or net-speak alternative for profane words.


[edit on 2-6-2009 by elevatedone]



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 07:54 PM
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Originally posted by sos37

Originally posted by mystiq
I actually completely agree with this analogy of the situation. Sexual abuse legislation is designed to protect children from adult predators and usery, not to punish teenagers from acting out due to their hormones or acting sexual themselves.

[edit on 30-5-2009 by mystiq]


Oh I see. So you must then believe that date rape or rape committed by a teen is acceptable and should not be prosecuted because the teen is simply acting on their hormones? Yes, that makes total sense. :shk:

[edit on 31-5-2009 by sos37]


Obviously thats not what I meant. This isn't about rape. This is related to sharing sexually explicit images, done by one teenager to another. This is not about rape, nor is it about an adult capitalizing on the situation. This is explorative behavior typical of all teenagers. Our laws are not meant to punish teenagers for their emerging sexuality, but to protect them from adults.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 08:01 PM
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*** ATTENTION ***

People please.

We know who wrote the article, do not keep referring to his name trying to make a joke.


1b.) Profanity: You will not use profanity in our forums, and will neither post with language or content that is obscene, sexually oriented, or sexually suggestive nor link to sites that contain such content. You will also not use common alternative spellings or net-speak alternative for profane words.


Also, uncivil and off-topic posts will be deleted.



posted on Jun, 3 2009 @ 05:09 PM
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Originally posted by vcwxvwligen
reply to post by Zerbst
 



Sending a pic of yourself is not the same thing as telling a joke. Apples and oranges.


I never said they were the same. My point is that this is something that should be moderated by parents, not law enforcement. Letting the public authority control private issues like this can and will lead to other matters, such as jokes, being regulated also.

Leave the doors to private life closed, or suffer the consequences! Why would you want more governance than you have already? Raise your own kids so those that do are not caught up in the bureaucracy resulting from your inadequacy.

Two things need to be learned here. Understanding proper uses of authoritative legislation and parental requirements. These two things seem to be causing a lot of unnecessary confusion nowadays?

Peace.



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