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The Moon and (No) Stars

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posted on May, 30 2009 @ 05:48 PM
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There have been a few discussions of late on the issue of why stars are not visible in some photos purported to have been taken on the Moon or in Earth orbit.

The standard photographic explantion has been ignored by those seeking to find a conspiratorial angle to the subject. However, in defence of the photographic explanation, I offer the following images taken this evening. In each case, one focused on the Moon at a fast exposure, the other taken at a more lengthy (15 sec) exposure as comparison.

The point being: if you wish to see detail on a bright object like this Moon you use a fast exposure setting and no stars are visible. If you want to show stars you use a longer exposure setting and the Moon (or Earth or whatever) is overexposed and no detail can be seen.

All pictures were taken in the space of a few minutes, this evening (in fact about 15 minutes before I started this post), from the same location - my front door. None have been altered other than reduced/sharpened using Irfanview software.



Thus I content that stars would not be expected to be seen in images where a bright object - such as the Moon reflecting sunlight - was intended to be shown in detail.

I hope this helps discussion on the matter











Note
the presence of what appears to be Nibiru in the longer exposure images is another matter




posted on May, 30 2009 @ 06:35 PM
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that image cannot be "another matter"! what is that? it looks pretty cool. I dont really know too much about this Planet X/Nibiru talk, but where did that come from? and what are the flat points of light around it?



posted on May, 30 2009 @ 06:40 PM
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i had never noticed the star thing your talking about. but excellent job of debunking. disproving something is just as important as proving somethng in these sectors of exploration.



posted on May, 30 2009 @ 06:53 PM
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another one of these threads.... ughhhh.... Dudes its all about the camera being used and the amount of light being let into or blocked from the shot...



posted on May, 30 2009 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by ziggyproductions05
 
There are two moon images in the right orientation,1 and 3,
the others must be a reflection from an additional lens.
should add in edit,that there are loads of night-time video of the sky
with too much wash from nearby lighting to show the detail properly,
so the OP's post is quite right in what is stated.


[edit on 30-5-2009 by smurfy]



posted on May, 30 2009 @ 07:55 PM
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reply to post by ziggyproductions05
 


Those flat white spots you see are stars. They look like small white lines because the exposure is long, and the stars moved (and or the camera moved). What you see is motion blur from the stars.



posted on May, 30 2009 @ 09:27 PM
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Nice pics

can you say the model of the digital camera?

and for the noobs out there, try to learn this time, is not so complicated to understand. peace



posted on May, 30 2009 @ 09:44 PM
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reply to post by 0nce 0nce
 


Ok - i feel dumb. I just picked up on your sarcasm now.
I really just looked at the pictures first and your last couple lines before reading the words above - then posted. my bad. Im glad you did this though, i've seen a lot of these type photos and now i know they may be using long exposures to create false anomalies...bummer.



posted on May, 31 2009 @ 01:44 AM
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Thks for the comments
The point of making a new thread for this, btw, was to make it easier to find and reference next time someone asks why no stars are visible .....



Originally posted by theSeeker84
Nice pics

can you say the model of the digital camera?

and for the noobs out there, try to learn this time, is not so complicated to understand. peace


Camera is Olympus SP560uz

Individual photo details:-

1) ISO200, F4.1, 1/320
2) ISO200, F4.5, 15 sec
3) ISO200, F4.5, 1/1000
4) ISO200, F4.5, 15 sec

The 3rd and 4th images were obviously taken using a closer zoom that the first 2.

I used a tripod throughout

As mentioned aready, the last images shows star trails close to the Moon due to the long exposure - these are much less obvious in the wider angled picture. There is also some impressive lens flaring!



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