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No Stars seen from Space?

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posted on Feb, 5 2012 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by DJW001
What are these, then?




An Invasion of Rods... most likely. Nice catch


Pathetic, and you know it.




posted on Feb, 5 2012 @ 08:33 PM
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Originally posted by DJW001

Pathetic, and you know it.


Yet here you are... right on queue



posted on Feb, 5 2012 @ 08:54 PM
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picture of Earth from the moon.

history.nasa.gov...

Some stars are visible if you look closely.

More visible in this image.



Notice how Earth starts to look more exposed as cameras adjust to let more light in to let stars become more apparent. This is photography 101 people. Stop being retarded.
edit on 2-5-12 by r3axion because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:03 AM
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reply to post by r3axion
 


Dont think they are stars on that picture most stars take a few seconds at the film speed and aperture settings used by the astronauts. The earth would be greatly over exposed to show stars.

Just as the moon would be if we photograph stars from the earth.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


Wow that's just classic. I show proof of stars and all of a sudden "those aren't stars!!!"
The Earth IS more exposed where the stars are more apparent. Did you even look at the first NASA image where the Earth exposure was normal? Hard to see the stars....

It wouldn't be "over"exposed because in case you forgot, the Earth has an atmosphere which is able to absorb light. The moon does not, so it only reflects light.

give it a break. your stupid myth has been debunked.
edit on 2-9-12 by r3axion because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by r3axion
 

The thing is, since the pictures were taken on film, you are looking at a scanned image. And a poor quality one at that. While the image is hosted on a NASA server, it is by Kipp Teague.

Here's a better one.
www.hq.nasa.gov...



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:13 PM
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Originally posted by r3axion
picture of Earth from the moon.

history.nasa.gov...

Some stars are visible if you look closely.

More visible in this image.



Notice how Earth starts to look more exposed as cameras adjust to let more light in to let stars become more apparent. This is photography 101 people. Stop being retarded.


That's a poor-quality scan (probably a scan of an old print). Here is a better version of that image, scanned directly from the original negatives (I think):



history.nasa.gov...



EDIT TO ADD:

Beat me to it, Phage.
edit on 2/9/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)

edit on 2/9/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Due to the positioning it doesn't appear to be the same image. Probably from the same set.

But the aperture is set for normal exposure in that image, thus filtering out any back ground lighting

ETA: the guy above me has the same image
edit on 2-9-12 by r3axion because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:17 PM
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reply to post by r3axion
 

It's the same frame that you posted a link to.
But see above.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


My bad I thought you were referring to the second image



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by r3axion
 


It's the only one it could be.

The image I posted was A11-44-6549

Sequentially, here is the image taken before it (A11-44-6548):
history.nasa.gov...

and here is the one taken after it (A11-44-6550):
history.nasa.gov...

It does look as if there is more "black" showing between the Earth and the Moon in your image than in the one I posted, but that may be due to the quality of the print -- which looks to be overly contrasted. Over-contrasting will bring out the "darks".


EDIT:
Thanks for the clarification Phage and r3axion.
edit on 2/9/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by r3axion
 


Ummmm.....


It wouldn't be "over"exposed because in case you forgot, the Earth has an atmosphere which is able to absorb light. The moon does not, so it only reflects light.


If that were the case, then the Earth would not be visible when the Sun shone on it, when viewed from space.

Perhaps that presumption and premise requires a bit more thought?

Oh, and while we know the effects of "Moonlight" and how it can illuminate a night-side Terran landscape, the same is true as it applies to "Earthlight" (or, more correctly "Earthshine", alternatively....not to be confused with redneck Moon residents brewing hooch in stills during the Lunar nights....in order to hide from the "Revenuers")....



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:24 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 

I posted a link to 6550.
That's the frame he had linked, but different from the image he posted.
I found the posted image. Obviously a very dirty scan. Smudged, scratched, dusty. There are stars on the Moon's surface.
images.ksc.nasa.gov...
edit on 2/9/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by ProudBird
 


All I know is, if I take a picture of the Moon and surrounding sky with a camera here on Earth using automatic settings, I get an over-exposed blob of a moon and NO stars (even when stars were visible to my eyes).

Reducing the exposure time to get less of an over-exposed Moon certainly won't help me see more stars.


edit on 2/9/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:30 PM
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When you exit the stratosphere you also see blackness beyond the Earth.

Why no stars

* No stars appear in the pictures supposedly taken from the Moon, and without atmosphere the stars should have readily appeared in photos of space taken on the Moon. (Study of the atmospheric transmission bands of visible light reaching Earth's surface indicates photos taken at night on Earth should show stars as well. Yet, they don't. You can try this yourself with your own camera.

The atmosphere permits visible light to reach us from stars. Doesn't the "Weekly World News" know the Sun is a star. The photos taken from the Moon didn't show the Sun either. Most Earth photos also lack a view of the Sun too, as the extreme brightness is too large compared to the reflected light from Earth scenes. Earth photos taken at night usually don't show stars either, unless a telescope and a time exposure picture is taken with brighter Earth objects shielded from the camera. But the greatest cause for the absence of stars in the Apollo astronauts photos is the depth of field or focus setting of each lunar snapshot. Even lunar rocks are out of focus, appearing blurred though only hundreds of feet away. The nearest star is more than 5 light years distance which would be a bit out of focus compared to the distant lunar terrain.)


er.jsc.nasa.gov...



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:31 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
That's a poor-quality scan (probably a scan of an old print). Here is a better version of that image, scanned directly from the original negatives (I think):



history.nasa.gov...


And here is the final version from NASA after they finished 'correcting the color'



So as long as NASA is manipulating images, how can we trust any of there photos? If you look at the far right hand side you will still see a bit of Moon color It was a sloppy over lay



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by ProudBird
reply to post by r3axion
 


Ummmm.....


It wouldn't be "over"exposed because in case you forgot, the Earth has an atmosphere which is able to absorb light. The moon does not, so it only reflects light.


If that were the case, then the Earth would not be visible when the Sun shone on it, when viewed from space.

Perhaps that presumption and premise requires a bit more thought?

Oh, and while we know the effects of "Moonlight" and how it can illuminate a night-side Terran landscape, the same is true as it applies to "Earthlight" (or, more correctly "Earthshine", alternatively....not to be confused with redneck Moon residents brewing hooch in stills during the Lunar nights....in order to hide from the "Revenuers")....




From your own link


Earthshine is many, many times dimmer than the direct light of the sun on the moon. Earthshine is even more faint because the moon's "albedo" (a specific kind of reflectivity) is less than Earth's.


Which is exactly what I'm saying. lol.


If that were the case, then the Earth would not be visible when the Sun shone on it, when viewed from space.


Incorrect. The ABSORPTION of light is different from REFLECTION.

Are you saying that the moon is not visible even with the increased light reflection?
Think out your next reply wisely.
edit on 2-9-12 by r3axion because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


My image (the one with the brownish-looking Moon) came from a NASA website.



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by mattifikation
 


well said... dont know much about cameras, but your explanation sounds pretty strong



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by r3axion
 


No this is a doctored photo, someone is taking 'creative license' to sell bullcrap on a conspiracy site. None of the series, and there's like 20 frames, can one adjust the exposure to image stars in the sky. Look how much color is on the lunar surface, probably also trying to make the double point NASA turns the moon gray.

Go back to the very link you posted and see if you see stars. This is a game someone is playing.

If you push the exposure far enough the same specs appear in the earth shadow, proving those aren't stars unless there's a few little stars between the moon and earth.
edit on 9-2-2012 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)




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