A question for Christians re: The Bible

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posted on Apr, 29 2004 @ 07:38 PM
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I seem to remember reading somewhere that when Jesus came to earth, he superceded the laws of the Old Testament.

The God of the OT is wrathful and destructive whereas the one of the NT is a loving father figure. So did the New Testament replace the Old Testament for Christians or are they both as valid?




posted on Apr, 29 2004 @ 08:08 PM
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both are valid.


OT has prophcys that predict the comming of christ

NT those said prophcys are fulfilled by christ

[Edited on 4-29-2004 by KrazyIvan]



posted on Apr, 30 2004 @ 12:16 AM
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Take the book of Leviticus and read it. You will immediately see a problem. Very specific instructions were given to people directly from God.

Christians often argue this book is reflective of the laws at the time the book is written and not valid today.



posted on Apr, 30 2004 @ 12:28 AM
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The Old Testament condemned people to death for their sins against God; also animals were sacrificed on the altar of God so humans wouldn't have to die for their sins. The sacrificing of animals was only a temporary means of salvation. The ultimate sacrifice was his own Son, Jesus. God was willing to send His only Son to Earth as the supreme sin sacrifice. Jesus died on the cross to pay for our sins. With his death animal sacrifice and being put to death for sinning became unnecessary because Jesus died for all sin for all time.



posted on May, 1 2004 @ 02:30 PM
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What exactly did OT predict: a coming of a prophet or a coming of son of God with purpose to die for our sins?



posted on May, 2 2004 @ 12:12 AM
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Jesus did not worship Yahweh as God. Jesus claimed to be the son of the great I Am of Moses. When Moses experienced the burning bush he was told to tell the Israelites the I Am had sent him not Yahweh even though that would have made more sense since all the Israelites would have recognized that name. This is confirmed by Paul when preaching to the Athenians he is asked what god he represents and again does not mention Yahweh but makes use of the statue of the unknown God. (The god within). In the Greek translation of the gospel (Luke I believe) Jesus refers to himself as the ena ena or I I a common reference of the time to the Cosmic I or I Am. Ena Ena (I Am) the truth the way and the light no one shall see the father except through me. We are indeed free of the Old Testament dogmas.
Go in peace serve the Lord!



posted on May, 2 2004 @ 12:21 AM
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Jesus was and is God (Yahweh, I am).

Exodus 3:13-14

Moses said to God, "Suppose I go to the Israelites and say to them, 'The God of your fathers has sent me to you,' and they ask me, 'What is his name?' Then what shall I tell them?" God said to Moses, "I am who I am. [2] This is what you are to say to the Israelites: 'I AM has sent me to you.' "

It is true that God refers to himself an “I am” many times in the bible. The Egyptians had many gods by many different names. Moses wanted to know God’s name so the Hebrew people would know who sent him to them. God called himself “I Am”, a name describing his eternal power and unchangeable character. Hebrews 13:8 says god is the same “yesterday and today and forever” because God’s nature is stable and trustworthy.

I’m sure you have heard God referred to as Yahweh. This is also accurate; Yahweh is derived from the Hebrew word for “I Am”.



posted on May, 2 2004 @ 01:15 AM
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“It is true that God refers to himself an “I am” many times in the bible. The Egyptians had many gods by many different names.”

The Egyptians were the first monotheists under Aknaton. Their form of worship was similar to modern Hindus. Their many gods were just different faces of their one true God (the Sun). This monotheism was borrowed by the Hebrews and rebelled against by Jesus.

“Moses wanted to know God’s name so the Hebrew people would know who sent him to them. God called himself “I Am”, a name describing his eternal power and unchangeable character.”

This is true and makes my point He did not refer to himself as Yahweh the fearsome sky god because that is not who he was. Yahweh was any thing but unchangeable more like fickle and barbaric.

“Hebrews 13:8 says god is the same “yesterday and today and forever” because God’s nature is stable and trustworthy.”

The reference to Hebrews does not refer to Yahweh but to the great I Am since it was written by Paul (or at least attributed to him) who also denied Yahweh in Athens. See first post.

“I’m sure you have heard God referred to as Yahweh. This is also accurate; Yahweh is derived from the Hebrew word for “I Am”.”

I beg to differ. The unspeakable name of god being Yahweh at all is guess work. It could just as well have been yihwah or yahwah or yehwih etc. since the vowels were never written. Secondly, the words most commonly used for I Am as modernly translated are anokhi (I first person sing.) and ehyeh (first person imp.of to be). IMHO You continue to fall into the same dogmatic trap that has ensnared many a biblical scholar.



posted on May, 21 2004 @ 11:02 AM
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God referred to Himself by many names...each one describing a part of His nature, or what He does for us:

El Roi- I am the God that sees you
El Shaddai- I am the Lord the breasted one (the mother nature of God as nurturer and provider of the sustainance for life)
Jehovah Rophai- I am the Lord who heals you
Jehovah Shammai- I am the Lord who hears you
Jehovah Shalom- I am the Lord your peace

these are just a few.

As for Paul,he took an opportunity. Because they had a statue of the unknown god to make sure they covered all of them...he took that opportunity to preach Christ.






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