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I feel sorry for Generation Y

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posted on May, 24 2009 @ 08:10 PM
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First of all, nobody likes to be lumped in with their "generational image." Yes, there are always plenty of exceptions. I remember lots of Gen X people grumbling about how they never wore Plaid, didn't like Kurt Cobain, and weren't "slackers," even though that was the generational image of gen X in the early 90s. Before that, there were lots of boomers who weren't hippies, and so on. When you are talking broad trends, any given individual will differ in some way from the overall stereotype.

So if you are Gen Y and the following doesn't apply to you as an individual member of Gen Y, don't get all huffy...in fact, if you are Gen Y and reading this site to begin with, that's a good indication you are a bit different from most of your cohorts.

Aaaanyway...I do feel sorry for these kids for the most part. Most of them are totally unprepared for the change that's coming, and its going to whack them upside the head.Let's take a look at the most negative aspects of the Gen Y stereotype for a moment:

-Spoiled yet emotinally stunted: Grew up in McMansions bought on credit by their chowderheaded parents. Showered with toys, gadgets, and shiny things but not given enough love and "quality time" by their harried, debt-slave parents.

-Materialistic: See above; also the emphasis on surface, "bling," the so-called "30-K millionare" who has little money but spends credit like water trying to appear rich; piling up lots of toys, etc.

-Self-centered ("everyone is a precious little indigo snowflake, a unique individual") and egomaniacal: everyone wants to be a "star;" the cult of celebrity reaches a fever pitch with this generation, from MySpace (emphasis on "MY" there) to kids shooting up malls because "at least I'll die famous."

-Etheralized and virtualized: saturated to the eyeballs with videogames, virtual friendships rather than real friends, grew up on line, watches tons of TV, etc. How many have ever hoed beans and gotten their hands dirty bailing hay on the farm, or worked in a factory as teens bolting together washing machines (both of which I did as a young fellow, back in ancient history before the Internet and "credit card nation").

-Entitled: Expect to be famous and rich as a matter of course. If you aren't in the top 1%, you are a "loser" who has "failed at life." This isn't their fault at all, let me add: this is the message the hypermaterialist media world of the last 20 years has beamed into their skull from day one to make them anxious, harried little consumers.

All of this is the WORST POSSIBLE MENTAL BACKGROUND for the earth-shattering crises and world-rocking change that we are seeing begin even as we speak. These kids have been promised the world and yet will have to eat catfood when and if they reach old age long after social security has gone belly-up, never mind whatever hellish decades of adulthood stand between the present and that grim, distant future.




posted on May, 24 2009 @ 08:20 PM
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I think with the time line i fit the Generation Y cat however please dont feel sorry for us
not all of us are those things or believe those you things to described.

Have faith that there are somepeople who dont fit the sterotypical view off this age. I am 18 and from what you see off how people have changed i can see that people have changed from our generation to the next already they are alot louder and selfish from what i have seen.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 08:25 PM
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Originally posted by thecrow001
I think with the time line i fit the Generation Y cat however please dont feel sorry for us
not all of us are those things or believe those you things to described.

Have faith that there are somepeople who dont fit the sterotypical view off this age. I am 18 and from what you see off how people have changed i can see that people have changed from our generation to the next already they are alot louder and selfish from what i have seen.



Sir --

Did you not read the first paragraph of my post? I specifically began by stating that lots of people, particularly those who post here, in that age group will not meet that stereotype.

I put that paragraph there specifically to head off this kind of post.

Whenever you are talking broad terms, obviously each individual is going to differ in some way from the stereotype. Please try to understand this: the world is a very big place. You, personally, may be Mahatma Ghandi, Albert Einstien, and Paul Bunyon all rolled into one, for all I know, and your friends and those around you may indeed be as sagacious as the founding fathers. But all that is a drop in the bucket in comparison to overall trends.

I am talking overall trends here, not individuals.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 08:31 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


i understand that, what i was doing is trying to give you a little hope my friend.

However overall i agree what you are saying about your OP. I feel sorry for them too in someways that their underprepared for whats to come in the bleak future.

[edit on 24-5-2009 by thecrow001]



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 08:35 PM
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Isn't this what the powers that be have wanted all along? It's the Corporate world that's doing this to the youth. I think it's an interesting movement from Gen X to Gen Y. I (age 21) was on the borderline crossing the two Gens. I was neither a Grunge head and was never very fascinated with the "Glamor" of Gen Y. I had always viewed the two as nothing more than a bid for the almighty God: Profit.

But as I got older I tend to look back to Gen X as a cornerstone of most of my thought involving the world today. It is my belief that Gen X was a last ditch effort to stage of Corporate Sponsorship. Before hand, Corporate America had gotten their greedy little hands into just about everything they could. That's when Nirvana and Alice in Chains started to emerge. Essentially a movement started that was so low-brow, so depressed so "Grungy" that it was thought it would be impossible to sell. But, as always, it turned out to be a failed attempt. So what did Kurt Cobain do? He turned the gun on himself.

I think that Gen Y has a lot to teach us about what the world has really become and how current youth has done nothing but give up. It's finally worked, Corporate America owns the Children.

P.S.

I HATE Hot Topic!


Edited for Spelling.

[edit on 24-5-2009 by Shamrock87]

[edit on 24-5-2009 by Shamrock87]



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 08:55 PM
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A lot of that could probably apply to every new generation, just update the terms. The baby boomers were thought to be nearly the same way, spoiled ect. The real problems everyone will be facing are economic problems, and the responsible party are the older folk who messed things up long before some of these people you're talking about were even born.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 08:58 PM
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I too hate to generalize but I feel sorry for these kids. They've never known life without the Internet, many are not being raised with substantial work ethics or feelings of self sufficiency, and they are being reared in a confused culture that stresses outward signs of "individuality" without the freedoms or responsibilities that go along with it.

I sure am glad I grew up in the 80s, when kids played outside, got injured, ate dirt and nobody died or sued each other for hateful thoughts. God only knows how this bunch will learn to fend for itself, too much of life is automated for them already.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by thecrow001
reply to post by silent thunder
 


i understand that, what i was doing is trying to give you a little hope my friend.

However overall i agree what you are saying about your OP. I feel sorry for them too in someways that their underprepared for whats to come in the bleak future.

[edit on 24-5-2009 by thecrow001]


OK, fair enuff...sorry for jumping all over you.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 09:03 PM
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I think that is a pretty good and kinda pessimistic analysis of gen. Y, but what is the point? Yeah, lots of them are materialistic and egotistical, but who really cares? That is their problem, that they in part created. They can deal with the consequences of their own actions (whatever they may be) just like everyone else does (or more likely, should). And who says the future will be grim anyways-in my world it is bright and happy-but you should know I'm part of gen. y and thus have mental problems.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 09:03 PM
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I'm sure the egomaniacal and etc you've mentioned well, excludes present company of course?

Although I am in the category Gen Y, I do have alot of the characteristics but do believe if push came to shove i'd be a great person although, if I was given any power, i'd abuse it and rape it, I know it, gut feeling.

Hey at least i'm honest, but I think this is a cycle like every other generation, it's hard for me to listen to the radio, I'll turn to the hip hop station and its constant bragging of how they all have money, (I wouldn't suspect anyone to listen to that happily in a recession!) Few songs I like anymore that are popular.


This phase will come and go, as long as something terribly drastic happens. Otherwise it'll be the same for longer, until inevitably something drastic happens.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 09:09 PM
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reply to post by cancerian42
 





Yeah, lots of them are materialistic and egotistical, but who really cares? That is their problem, that they in part created. They can deal with the consequences of their own actions (whatever they may be) just like everyone else does (or more likely, should).


I have to disagree with you on that. I don't think that these kids created the problem. I think it's a result of constant bombardment of information from television ads, cultures created by Disney, Wal-Mart, Hot-Topic. I really believe that the people involved in "Gen Y" aren't necessarily responsible for who they've become, but rather they are a result of the Corporate Machine.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 09:13 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


No problem.

lets hope things dont go bad for Y generation so they need to learn the skills however we are not in the best times, probally the worst times that i've ever been in but i am young. so my experiences are lacking.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by Shamrock87
 

Please, let's not make this into a determinism vs. freewill debate.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 09:19 PM
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Yes indeed I know this wasn't meant to be a generalization of all Y-ers....But being one myself I will comment on something you said which is incredibly true.

The out of control materialism, especially in the middle class, was blinding. However, the more affluent areas of the country have been hit unbearably hard....and that credit probably dried up two years ago. Gen. Y-ers are LUCKY. We are lucky to have seen the financial meltdown (not caused by us....however we were the victims...) because honestly, most of us have gone from "needing" everything to...knowing what we actually need.

We will fare quite better than Gen. X.......

I am actually glad this happened.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 09:45 PM
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Originally posted by Shamrock87

I have to disagree with you on that. I don't think that these kids created the problem. I think it's a result of constant bombardment of information from television ads, cultures created by Disney, Wal-Mart, Hot-Topic. I really believe that the people involved in "Gen Y" aren't necessarily responsible for who they've become, but rather they are a result of the Corporate Machine.



I'll have to agree with this one here. Being 21, I have seen so many people that just eat up whats on tv and on the radio and feel like they have to emulate it, lose weight, get iphones, etc... Go look at a fashion mag then walk around your local mall. All these kids want to be fashionista for peace models who 'think green'. I'm all for the ideals but only thinking this way because 'global warming' is shoved down your throat is pretty disgusting.

It's funny about Hot Topic too. Thanks to them being an 'outsider' is whats 'in'. Haha.

Sorry for being so negative here.. but I really would need to be proved wrong. Then again, I suppose when I was growing up if nothing was wrong in my world I wouldn't really question it anyways then either, now would I?

No one actually BELIEVES they are being told what to think. The message: No individual thought. Yet everyone thinks their an individual. Odd.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 10:32 PM
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While the image of our youth is that of supreme materialism, in truth I've realised that in general we actually have a more conservative values in regards to needs, whereas our parents are more geared towards wants masquerading as needs. That doesn't stop us from wanting certain things, and it doesn't stop advertisers from pandering to us using tactics that worked on our parent's generation, but I know that we are smart enough to see how transparent the tactics are. They're less effective on us, because we know that needs come first before wants. We look at the consequences of our actions. Teens and young adults have a lot of disposable cash and that contributes to the materialistic image, but when push comes to shove we are quite conservative with our funds. If we don't have the money for something, we don't get it! We've learned from our parent's mistakes.

Nearly everyone in my age group that I know is more responsible financially than those I know in the gen X category. DESPITE the stereotypes about our age groups.

My mother is a prime example of A Gen Xer who has the hardest time saying no to herself, and most of those in her generation that I've known seem to share that characteristic as well. She's gotten herself into a sizable debt buying things she could never afford in the first place, and that she really didn't need. We go out grocery shopping together and I say to her ten times "do you really need that?" "that isn't really worth it!" etc... It's rather disheartening to be more responsible than your parent, but there it is. I've seen these differences echoed in my friends and their parents as well.

Although in my teenage years I did spend cash frivolously, it's because I had that freedom to do so. From 19 onwards when I lived on my own and took care of my own needs financially I became extremely conservative financially. I don't have a single credit card, I don't buy anything I can't comfortably afford. I use cash instead of debit cards (less bank fees!) I'd rather bike/walk somewhere than take the public transit/drive a car. To me, clothes are something that keeps me from walking around naked, not a way to show off. I eat cheap, but healthy.

I don't value material items very much at all. I don't watch TV. The only materialistic thing I have an interest in, is internet and computers. Internet is a great resource for information that I would not have access to in "real life". That's the long and short of it. Without a computer I can't get on the internet. To me, knowledge is priceless, which is why as long as I can afford an internet connection, it will be higher on my list of needs than anything else in the "entertainment" world.

I'm not saying that ALL people in my generation are as conservative as me, but most certainly they are more conservative in general, than their parents generation, and I believe we will see that come into play as our generation ages and takes over.

[edit on 24-5-2009 by poisonmekare]



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


Although I do agree with your general description of my generation, I do believe that a large percentage of us are "independent thinkers" (aka on this website, or interested in things outside the norm).

Plus, many, many people in my generation have parents who cannot afford their mortgages or taxes, and many people that I know have parents on welfare.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 10:38 PM
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I feel bad for generation Z.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 10:45 PM
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reply to post by poisonmekare
 

I feel sorry for generation x, always worrying and frantic that they won't be happy. I might even say they are in a way more materialistic than gen. y, because they rely on things to measure their "happiness", they always want a better house, a better car, better appearance whereas gen. y is more like you describe. One more thing is gen. y's acceptance of others differences, it's not like where it used to be where popularity depended on money, appearance, and social skills...because now we are all "spoiled" and look decent and we usually have some place where we are somewhat popular, either in a clique of friends or online.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by cancerian42
 


I'd say that's more or less the problem with GEN Y. which was stated in the OP.
Gen X wasn't about money or fame or buying a new car or what have you. . well after Kurt Cobain died that's essentially what it became but that's not what it originally was. Well actually I think a better statement would be to say that it died when it was labeled "Gen X".

I mean just take a quick look back at what the kids of those days were wearing. Dime-store flannel shirts and tore-up jeans, etc. . Well they still wear holey jeans except now they're paying 60 - 100 bucks for a pair.

Gen X. wasn't worried about whether or not they would be happy. They were trying to escape the grip of corporate influence.



[edit on 24-5-2009 by Shamrock87]

[edit on 24-5-2009 by Shamrock87]







 
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