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Involuntary Military Service Under the Radar

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posted on May, 23 2009 @ 06:12 PM
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This is worrying. People are being called back up for involuntary military service after they have been discharged. I had no idea this went on nowadays. Scarey practice.


It is the story of a soldier who, after serving a tour overseas and being discharged from active duty, received involuntary orders to redeploy to Iraq or Afghanistan years later.



Since September 11, 2001, about 28,000 IRR members in the US Army have been mobilized, according to Maj. Maria Quon, Army public affairs officer. There have been 3,868 Marines involuntarily recalled and mobilized during that time, according to Major O'Connor, Marine Corps spokesman.



Dobbs told his mom to rip up his activation orders, and he hasn't looked back since. The military made several attempts to contact him, but he ignored them every time. On April 19, 2009, Dobbs was discharged from the IRR. He is still waiting to receive his papers.


Source




posted on May, 23 2009 @ 06:32 PM
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Those who receive honorable discharges are technically on reserve status for a period of years after their term ends, usually somewhere around 7 years. They can legally recall you for duty during that time.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 04:55 AM
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It's just one of those things. It was on the contract they signed, so they're obligated. Legally, it's no more involuntary military service than a soldier deciding they don't want to be in the military during their term.

Just goes to show that you should be careful and read thoroughly about what you sign up for.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 05:00 AM
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Simply put, a four year enlistment is actually 8... the first four being your 'active' tour, the last being your reserve. You must do either 8 years of active duty, or the split duty mentioned above, before you can truly seperate from the service.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 06:06 PM
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Yeah, I guess that makes sense really. Hhhmm, I hate the way we can just 'sign away our freedom'. Not for me I'm afraid.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 07:30 PM
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reply to post by and14263
 


Also related to this; keep in mind that when you retire from the US military, as I did the Army, you are not discharged, ever. You are transfered to the "Retired Reserve" and could (thoretically) be recalled anytime the rest of your life. In most cases, many retirees health would prohibit them from recall, but it's always possible. Of course, you know this when you retire. Because I am in the retired reserve, I still have a US Army ID Card, certain military benefits, and am allowed to use my military rank in certain situations.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 07:40 PM
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My brother had to do 4 years over seas and then had to do two years as a reserve to be discharged completely. I don't think You have to do reserve duty when You get out to finish off Your time I believe. I think the people that are getting recalled might not have done their reserve requirements.



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