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WD-40 Miracle Oil :)

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posted on May, 23 2009 @ 07:38 PM
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I didn't believe it until I saw it in action, but spray it on your bait next time you go fishing.

Weird but true.




posted on May, 23 2009 @ 08:23 PM
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As someone else stated WD-40 stands for Water Displacement 40. What it does is to remove water in a part of machinary and when it dries you are left with a waxy coating that prevents further water getting in. One of my hobbies is lockpicking and a common mistake by new pickers is to lubricate locks with WD-40. They then wonder why the thing stops working


WD-40 is brilliant, but only for certain things and i cannot imagine a good reason for wasting space in my bug out bag for this.



posted on May, 23 2009 @ 08:37 PM
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if you need to start a diesel engine use WD40 instead of starter fluid.

its easier on the engine and you can spray it in till the fuel system fills up if need be.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 11:15 AM
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reply to post by silo13
 


Yes, WD-40 needs it own thread! Without WD-40 I would not be who I am today. I am pretty sure that the guy who invented it has a special spot in heaven set aside for him.

My favorite use for it is as an air freshener.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by downtown436
 


So basically what you're saying is that WD-40 is on gods door hinges?

You should work in their marketting department.

"It's the solvent god uses"

Love it.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 01:05 PM
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It will also clean greasy hands, and constant usage will help with joint pain in the hands. I pulled wrenches for almost 40 years, and as you can imagine, my hands hurt a lot now. A shot of old WD rubbed in does wonders for this, plus it lubes car window seals and power window guides, and will waterproof your distributor cap and spark plug wires, just spray directly into the inside of the cap, and the plug wire ends, and reinstall. Now you can spray water right on the cap/wires and the engine will still start and run. Keeps weapons from rusting too, and tools.



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by silo13
spraying wasp nests (then light)

More great uses here...

[edit on 23-5-2009 by silo13]


Are you NUTS? How about "hold ignition source in front of nozzle, creating a flamethrower effect"? : )

I've heard the biggest disadvantage to WD is that it contains water (sounds crazy, doesn't it?). Does anyone know for sure? May just be a rumor from a salesman for a competing product. Or, (gasp) a CONSPIRACY!



posted on May, 24 2009 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by ImaginaryReality1984
 

You're probably right! And apparently, Satan would NEVER use WD, hence the old saying, "Stuck tighter than the Gates of Hell".



posted on May, 25 2009 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by silo13
 


WD-40 induced misfire was not a problem at the range. SOP for misfire.

Point was, if that misfire had happened during a firefight instead of on the range, I would not be celebrating memorial day today.

Thus, I hate this stuff with an athletic passion.

The cans should have to carry a disclaimer saying DO NOT USE ON GUNS.

[edit on 25-5-2009 by Chakotay]



posted on May, 25 2009 @ 01:19 PM
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Yep WD40 is pretty great stuff... Don't go using it on chains like motorbike drive chains, push bikes and that sort of thing. When me and my mates used to do that we drastically reduced their life span, use a proper chain lube or at a push soak it in engine oil over night... Something about the WD40 seems to strip away any protection from the weather.



posted on May, 26 2009 @ 02:47 AM
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WD-40 is indeed amazing stuff, but not quite the ultimate all-purpose fluid. Also have on hand Marvel Mystery Oil, powdered graphite lubricant, and Zippo or Ronsonol lighter fluid. Make sure and have all 4 on hand for your various general cleaning and lubricating needs and you will never be caught short.

Oh, yeah, it doesn't hurt to have some graphite-based heavy grease on hand as well, but that's really a different topic than light lubricants/cleaners.

[edit on 26/5/2009 by RR98]



posted on May, 29 2009 @ 12:41 AM
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I always have some laying around but I'm about to get a few more cans! Thanks OP!



posted on May, 29 2009 @ 09:22 AM
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Originally posted by Chakotay
This junk almost cost me my life once.

Sprayed it on a duty revolver regularly. When requal time came at the range I stepped up and pulled the trigger through, and... two seconds later... hammer goes down slowly... tap and- no boom!


so, you spray crap into your gun and never clean the mechanism afterwards? as long as there are components which do not vaporise, it'll build up (d'uh).

if it did not create a film how could it form a coating to repel water and prevent rust? it's not a lubricant, is it?!



posted on May, 29 2009 @ 09:52 AM
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reply to post by whitewolf60
 


Here is a LINK to the Material Safety Data Sheet for WD-40. Although they do not list water as one of the ingredients, I suppose it could possibly fall under the category of "Non-Hazardous Ingredients"


Aliphatic Hydrocarbon - 45% to 50%
Petroleum Base Oil - 15%-25%
LVP Aliphatic Hydrocarbon - 12%-18%
Carbon Dioxide - 2%-3%
Non-Hazardous Ingredients - >10%


[edit on 29-5-2009 by Snisha]



posted on May, 29 2009 @ 10:01 AM
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reply to post by makeitso
 


Isn't WD-40 mostly fish oil?



posted on May, 29 2009 @ 10:45 AM
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Originally posted by Now_Then
Yep WD40 is pretty great stuff... Don't go using it on chains like motorbike drive chains, push bikes and that sort of thing. When me and my mates used to do that we drastically reduced their life span, use a proper chain lube or at a push soak it in engine oil over night... Something about the WD40 seems to strip away any protection from the weather.


It's a solvent that's why. It removes grease and water and replaces it with a waxy coating designed to keep water out. The problem with it on a chain is that the wazy stuff gets removed very quickly and so it's left bare to the elements.



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