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The Milky-Way Galaxy/Earth Biodiversity Link

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posted on May, 19 2009 @ 10:56 PM
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Biodiversity on Earth is linked to the orbit of our galaxy that the Sun makes. The position of our Sun determines the bio-diversity on Earth


1n 1999, Astronomers focusing on a star at the center of the Milky Way, measured precisely how long it takes the sun to complete one orbit (a galactic year) of our home galaxy: 226 million years.

The last time the sun was at that exact spot of its galactic orbit, dinosaurs ruled the world. The Solar System is thought to have completed about 20–25 orbits during its lifetime or 0.0008 orbit since the origin of humans.

Using a radio telescope system that measures celestial distances 500 times more accurately than the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers plotted the motion of the Milky Way and found that the sun and its family of planets were orbiting the galaxy at about 135 miles per second. That means it takes the solar system about 226 million years to orbit the Milky Way and puts the most precise value ever determined on one of the fundamental motions of the Earth and its sun.


Entire Article: Milky Way - Earth Bio diversity link




posted on May, 20 2009 @ 12:59 AM
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reply to post by sunny_2008ny
 


Have they factored their equations for a circular or elliptical orbit? Do we even know what it would be? ... or is just science by averages?

IRM



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