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Only 27% Of Aspiring Teachers Pass Math Test

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posted on May, 19 2009 @ 07:45 AM
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This is just plain sad.
Math and science were my 2 favorite subjects in school.

Aspiring school teachers fail in math


MALDEN, Mass. (WPRI) - According to state education officials, nearly three-quarters of the people who took the state elementary school teacher’s licensing exam this year failed the new math section.

The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is releasing the results Tuesday. They say that only 27 percent of the more than 600 candidates who took the test passed. The test was administered in March of this year.

The teacher’s licensing exam tested potential teachers on their knowledge of elementary school mathematics. This included geometry, statistics, and probability.

Education Commissioner Mitchell Chester was not surprised by the results. He told the Boston Globe that these results indicate that many students are not receiving an adequate math education.

Tom Scott, executive director of the Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents , says "The high failure rate puts a shining light on a deficiency in teacher-prep programs."




posted on May, 19 2009 @ 08:11 AM
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reply to post by Ferris.Bueller.II
 


It's the "new" math. Dang new math! Okay, maybe some of you don't know what I'm talking about. But, they've come up with a way to confuse multiplication and division even more! For example, my daughter once came home with a worksheet in long division. She asked for help. I had NO IDEA how to do what her teacher was asking. I know how to do long division.

All I can say is it involved putting numbers in boxes....seemed twice as confusing. Now, her middle school teachers are saying, forget that...do it the old fashioned way. My daughter asked me to teach her to old way. She said, that was easy!

Okay, so maybe the new math isn't the only cause of these teachers' low test scores. I think it goes deeper than that. But, my point is that they make math so "bad" that even the smart kids are confused. They think math is a punishment.



[edit on 19-5-2009 by Pamie]



posted on May, 19 2009 @ 09:09 AM
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reply to post by Pamie
 


Yeah, I know what you mean, my child came home with some "new" math problems
. I told her to bring home her book so I could have a look at it. It was confusing, but I got it. I taught her how to do it the traditional way as well, just as a way to check her work, since the school wants the children to all use the same method, but she was having problems with the "new" method.

I'm not suprised that only 27% of teachers pass the math portion, just on a very basic level I've caught numerous mistakes when my child brings home "graded" papers. So, now in addition to checking her work before she turns it in, now I have to check the graded papers as well, since the teacher likes to mark answers wrong that are in fact correct. This is one of the many reasons that I do supplemental schooling for her. If I would like for her to know how to read, perform basic math functions, and know a thing or two about history I have to take a proactive role. Really though I don't know how different that is from when I was kid, we always had educational field trips with my parents. Perhaps, today most parents are too busy to take that proactive role as educator. I know I thought I was too busy until I started getting more involved in her 1st grade class, then I realized the importance and its been teacher mommy ever since.



posted on May, 19 2009 @ 09:14 AM
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What's a teacher but a unionized, tax-payer funded baby sitter? If the little brats open their mouths just pacify them with a line from the answer key or send them to the administrators for "correction."

Math has nothing to do with what passes for teaching.



posted on May, 19 2009 @ 09:16 AM
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No teacher left behind.


Nobody worth a crap wants to teach because they don't make squat. This is what you end up with I guess.

Peace


[edit on 19-5-2009 by Dr Love]



posted on May, 19 2009 @ 05:09 PM
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Haha, I think maths is pretty irrelivent to teaching unless your going to teach maths. To get into uni and onto my teacher training course i "NEED" maths at a C grade, currently, i'm just at the D and thats after 3 years of trying. I hate the subject. I dont want to fly to the moon, Algebra's of no use to me or anyone i'll teach. Circle theorum? Cant imagen what i'd use it for, but still, they demand you have the grade in order to teach.

Its a silly rule. I'm just not mathamatical. The subject just bores me.



posted on May, 19 2009 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by SearchLightsInc
 


Whether or not you can use specific formulas, equations or theorems is moot. Learning math beyond arithmetic teaches logic, reasoning and essentially how to think, how to form opinions based in reality, how to present those opinions, how to change your opinion and how to recognize information that is worth changing your opinion for.

Ever have to teach a kid or adult how to recognize worthwhile information in a sea of garbage information? That's what math does for the everyday.

Knowing only 27% of the slobs teaching our kids are capable of simple logic and reasoning really sheds some light on the pervasiveness of this nanny-state culture the globe seems so enthralled to be a part of.

Saying you don't need math is like saying you don't need to think.



posted on May, 21 2009 @ 03:36 PM
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It seems to me you get what you pay for. When teachers make a decent salary you will attract talent, when you pay them peanuts you get drones who can do little more than babysit. Of course not many make a decent salary anymore it seems like the middle class is vanishing.

If it were up to me teachers would make as much as doctors they are just as important and they should be required to have the same level of education. That is when we would see real change in our schools and our country. We need to get away from the "those who can't do, teach" paradigm.



posted on May, 21 2009 @ 04:11 PM
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Originally posted by SearchLightsInc
Haha, I think maths is pretty irrelivent to teaching unless your going to teach maths. To get into uni and onto my teacher training course i "NEED" maths at a C grade, currently, i'm just at the D and thats after 3 years of trying. I hate the subject. I dont want to fly to the moon, Algebra's of no use to me or anyone i'll teach. Circle theorum? Cant imagen what i'd use it for, but still, they demand you have the grade in order to teach.

Its a silly rule. I'm just not mathamatical. The subject just bores me.


It would also appear that a basic grasp of the English language and grammar alludes you, as well!

I suppose proper spelling, sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization are just silly rules too?

Please explain to me why a person who is functionally illiterate, in addition to failing to understand the purpose of mathematics, let alone understand it, would want to teach in the first place.

You would be doing a greater service to yourself, as well as your future students, to take a job at the Golden Arches. I would suspect the pay these days is comparable.

It is not my intention to single you out and make this appear as a personal slight, but you are a perfect example of how a generation of children left behind educationally creates a downward educational spiral from which we may never be able to recover. If the teachers are not properly educated, then how can they be expected to educate the next generation?

I agree that teachers in the United States are not offered the salaries that they should. I entirely understand that those who do possess a proper education find their way into the private sector rather than public education. However, it is downright unethical and abhorrent that States would certify instructors who do not possess the most basic of skills which they are called on by the public trust to teach.

If a child does not receive a fundamental understanding in Reading, Writing and Mathematics then they are unable to educate themselves to compensate for the inadequacies of their teachers. If a child does not receive a fundamental understanding of Geography, History, Social Studies then they are unprepared to function in society. If a child does not receive a fundamental understanding of Biology, Chemistry, Physics then they are unprepared to further the understanding of those that came before them. If a child does not receive a fundamental understanding of Logic/Reason, Rhetoric, and Foreign Language then they are unprepared to step upon the World Stage in any relevant manner. If a child does not receive a fundamental understanding in but a single one of these, they are most certainly unprepared to teach!

Whether a teacher is a General Ed., Physical Ed., Special Ed., Math, Science, English, Social Studies, Language teacher is entirely irrelevant. From a Kindergarten teacher to a High School teacher, each and every one of them should possess a basic understanding and competency in all of these essential fields, along with an advanced understanding and competency of the specific field they are certified in. If they are not, then this is a crime that is being perpetuated to not only today's students but to tomorrow's, as well.



posted on May, 27 2009 @ 01:50 PM
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Considering our students are graduating with less and less proficiency, is it any wonder the future teachers are going to be less and less capable? No Child Left behind---> No Teacher Left Behind----> Education Left Behind.



posted on May, 27 2009 @ 03:55 PM
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Mathematics is an essential part of education, if not the most important factor.

I had great difficulty with algebra and trigonometry when I was younger. Even to the point that I let my deficiency dictate what I thought I could do for a living.

I failed algebra I two times in college, until one day I said to myself, "This is complete bullsh*t." I am not applying myself, and I wasn't..

From that day on, I committed myself, buckled down, and have since gone on to learn Algebra, Statistics & Probability theory, Trigonometry, Pre-calculus, and Calculus..

I later went on to accumulate 50+ credit hours focused in chemistry, biology & physics, something that would have been impossible to do without understanding math. However, my degree is in a different field of study.

The knowledge I have gained through the understanding of mathematical principles and concepts has proved itself to be priceless.

I have heard many people complain, "Well, I don't want to be a rocket scientist" or, "Math has nothing to with what I want to do for a living." And I'm sorry, but these excuses are exactly what they are...Excuses..

Mathematics has something to do with everything that happens in the world.

Understanding mathematics expands the minds ability to understand many other concepts that have nothing to do with mathematics. This is a fact. It is a field that requires discipline to learn, practice to retain, and understanding to regurgitate.

By developing these aspects of an individuals intelligence, a person is better equipped mentally to make more sound, rational, and all around more intelligent decisions in relation to many different situations.

If a person, more or less a teacher cannot understand algebra, or statistics, I am terribly sorry, but I do not think that they deserve to be teaching anybody anything on a professional level.. Period.

-CosmicClearance



posted on May, 28 2009 @ 03:16 PM
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Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
reply to post by SearchLightsInc
 


Whether or not you can use specific formulas, equations or theorems is moot. Learning math beyond arithmetic teaches logic, reasoning and essentially how to think, how to form opinions based in reality, how to present those opinions, how to change your opinion and how to recognize information that is worth changing your opinion for.

Ever have to teach a kid or adult how to recognize worthwhile information in a sea of garbage information? That's what math does for the everyday.

Knowing only 27% of the slobs teaching our kids are capable of simple logic and reasoning really sheds some light on the pervasiveness of this nanny-state culture the globe seems so enthralled to be a part of.

Saying you don't need math is like saying you don't need to think.


Man o man...I really wish I could just get every kid in my school to read this.

All I ever hear is "Math is pointless!"...

Like you said, it is not about learning the actual topic that matters (it does for your grade), but to become more logical.



posted on May, 28 2009 @ 03:19 PM
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Originally posted by SearchLightsInc
Haha, I think maths is pretty irrelivent to teaching unless your going to teach maths. To get into uni and onto my teacher training course i "NEED" maths at a C grade, currently, i'm just at the D and thats after 3 years of trying. I hate the subject. I dont want to fly to the moon, Algebra's of no use to me or anyone i'll teach. Circle theorum? Cant imagen what i'd use it for, but still, they demand you have the grade in order to teach.

Its a silly rule. I'm just not mathamatical. The subject just bores me.


I do not know what you want to teach, but not all teachers get to pick exactly what they want to teach. They can specify and object, but you do not walk in saying you want to teach this, when they might need a spot for a math teacher.

Also, may I suggest a course in spelling?



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 08:16 AM
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It would also appear that a basic grasp of the English language and grammar alludes you, as well!

I suppose proper spelling, sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization are just silly rules too?

Please explain to me why a person who is functionally illiterate, in addition to failing to understand the purpose of mathematics, let alone understand it, would want to teach in the first place.

You would be doing a greater service to yourself, as well as your future students, to take a job at the Golden Arches. I would suspect the pay these days is comparable.

It is not my intention to single you out and make this appear as a personal slight, but you are a perfect example of how a generation of children left behind educationally creates a downward educational spiral from which we may never be able to recover. If the teachers are not properly educated, then how can they be expected to educate the next generation?

I agree that teachers in the United States are not offered the salaries that they should. I entirely understand that those who do possess a proper education find their way into the private sector rather than public education. However, it is downright unethical and abhorrent that States would certify instructors who do not possess the most basic of skills which they are called on by the public trust to teach.

If a child does not receive a fundamental understanding in Reading, Writing and Mathematics then they are unable to educate themselves to compensate for the inadequacies of their teachers. If a child does not receive a fundamental understanding of Geography, History, Social Studies then they are unprepared to function in society. If a child does not receive a fundamental understanding of Biology, Chemistry, Physics then they are unprepared to further the understanding of those that came before them. If a child does not receive a fundamental understanding of Logic/Reason, Rhetoric, and Foreign Language then they are unprepared to step upon the World Stage in any relevant manner. If a child does not receive a fundamental understanding in but a single one of these, they are most certainly unprepared to teach!

Whether a teacher is a General Ed., Physical Ed., Special Ed., Math, Science, English, Social Studies, Language teacher is entirely irrelevant. From a Kindergarten teacher to a High School teacher, each and every one of them should possess a basic understanding and competency in all of these essential fields, along with an advanced understanding and competency of the specific field they are certified in. If they are not, then this is a crime that is being perpetuated to not only today's students but to tomorrow's, as well.


Indeed, my spelling isnt quite up to scratch but i havent said once in this thread that i'm excellent with grammer and such, I myself am i victem of poor education, 30 to 1 class teacher ratio - But that doesnt discredit my logic, does it?

I disagree completely with ANYONE who thinks math's teach's people logic. Its wonderful if you love the subject and feel the need to defend it, but i honestly cannot stand anything exsessive such as Algebra. I'm sorry, it just serves no purpose and does not better me in any way.

I think what many of you need to accept is simply that people can only do maths to a certain level before they switch off. Yes, its useful if your going to do something with it, but for the most part people just need a basic knowledge of it.

And i'm not sorry for any spelling errors


[edit on 4-6-2009 by SearchLightsInc]



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 08:25 AM
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I do not know what you want to teach, but not all teachers get to pick exactly what they want to teach. They can specify and object, but you do not walk in saying you want to teach this, when they might need a spot for a math teacher.

Also, may I suggest a course in spelling?


Firstly, i'm based in the uk, so i'll be going to uni to learn everything to do with my choosen subject (My course also ties in with Education, so i'll be in schools training which will help for sure)

If your willing to sugest a course for spelling, Perhaps i may sugest you take a course on not being rude and trying to level yourself on the faults of others?
The english language is silly. Words such as tear have double meanings, are you going to defend that? I have a book on the side thats suppose to help me get better spelling, instead, it drones on and on and on about how english was made - which doesnt help.
If a book cannot teach me how to spell correctly, how else am i to learn?



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 08:38 AM
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Originally posted by SearchLightsInc
I disagree completely with ANYONE who thinks math's teach's people logic. Its wonderful if you love the subject and feel the need to defend it, but i honestly cannot stand anything exsessive such as Algebra. I'm sorry, it just serves no purpose and does not better me in any way.


tommy has five pebbles in total, three are in his left hand, how many are in his right hand, or

X+3=5 , find x.

ho about i earn £500 a week, rent is £200, how much do i have left....or

x + 200 = 500, find x.

that's all algebra is, that's all it's for and that's all it does, it allows you to think about numbers you don't know, let's you note simple logic on paper.

just because you don't understand it, doesn't mean it's excessive.

and honestly, can't spell, can't do simple math, can't punctuate, can't construct a sentence, what do you want to teach, PE?

if you want to learn how to read/write properly, get a library card and start with A, then move to B and then go to C, and so on. you need to read, and then read, and then read.

[edit on 4/6/09 by pieman]



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 08:52 AM
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reply to post by SearchLightsInc
I hope my children are never in your class, if you get one. You aren't sorry for spelling errors, don't like math...what are you planning to teach? Even 1st graders need more advanced math than what used to be taught. There is no longer any place for a math illiterate to hide in our school system.

It's sad to see some that are trying to be teachers. I give an exam that teachers must pass in my state to be certified. The answers are scary. One question asked for them to describe some consequences of the Civil War. One student said that it allowed America to break free from Britain. Another mentioned that the intense fighting caused the breakup of the large land forms and formed the present day continents. I wish I was making this up.

Another one got angry with me when I would not help her solve a math equation during the test. She even waited in the parking lot afterward to see if I would give her the answer then.

Luckily, these people are the exceptions. Most teachers I know (including myself) are teaching because we want to. We all knew the salary going into the profession, just as policeman and other professions that are on the low end do. I chose it because I want to make a difference. Money does not matter near as much as seeing a child change from an unmotivated student with no plans to an interested, questioning citizen.

I do this by teaching math. If you fail to see the connection between logical reasoning and math, then so far you are only approaching math at its most basic 'drill and kill' form. All my students know the quote, "Use your mind to learn the math, then use the math to learn to use your mind".

I feel sorry for all those that refuse to learn things because they don't see their immediate relevance to daily life. I want more for myself, my family and my students than the bare basics needed for exsistence.



[edit on 4-6-2009 by Fogweb]



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 09:19 AM
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Ahh yes, what a fine teacher you are fogweb, instead of trying to help me understand your point of view, you make me seem simple, arrogant and unworthy of a teaching post - A* right there.

The main reason i'd like to go into teaching is to make a difference. If i could change 3 things about the current UK system it would be:

1) All students below par for English & Math's been more personal tutoring, so that they to can attain the ability to improve and be confident. This, i'm certain, would settle them down in lessons because they may UNDERSTAND more about what there learning.

2) Ban school leauge tables - Education is not a competition and school's shouldnt be underfunded because there pass rate sucks. This merely creates a cycle of failure.

3) Introduce Politics into the state schools. - Now THAT is useful to anyone.

Oh, and i am NOT refusing to learn things. After 3 attempts to pass my maths exam at a C grade or above i have failed AND STILL TRIED AGAIN. Given how fustrating and horrible Math's is, ALOT of people CANNOT BE ASSED. I bought a fricking book to improve my spelling - Another sign of wanting to better myself. What more could you possibly need from me?

To know any subject you need a good teacher. You wanna know how competent maths teachers ive had in my 7 year higher education? ZERO.
I hope my children never get a teacher such as yourself. You clearly are unable to read and take in exactly what i'm saying. Therefore if you cannot understand, How the hell are you going to teach?


tommy has five pebbles in total, three are in his left hand, how many are in his right hand, or

X+3=5 , find x.

ho about i earn £500 a week, rent is £200, how much do i have left....or

x + 200 = 500, find x.

that's all algebra is, that's all it's for and that's all it does, it allows you to think about numbers you don't know, let's you note simple logic on paper.


I would LOVE to have that kind of easy algebra in my exams. And i mean i would DIE of laughter if it was that easy. To put my problem into context i'ma just go peak inside my revision book and pull out something horrible...

Simplify: 2x(x - 1)
-----------
(x-1)

Or...

Factorise: 15x4y + 20x2y3 + -35x3yz2

And for a proper challenge, perhaps one of you can tell me when i would ever use this?



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 10:17 AM
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Originally posted by SearchLightsInc
Simplify: 2x(x - 1)
-----------
(x-1)


that's pretty easy, the (x-1) on the top cancels out the (x-1) on the bottom,and leaves 2x.




Factorise: 15x4y + 20x2y3 + -35x3yz2


looks like gibberish to me.


And for a proper challenge, perhaps one of you can tell me when i would ever use this?


if you only knew the stuff you needed to know, it would be a pretty sad waste of a life.

engineers or computer programmers or physicists need this stuff professionally, but the systematic problem solving skills required to work the stuff out are required by everyone.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 10:30 AM
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Factorise: 15x4y + 20x2y3 + -35x3yz2



looks like gibberish to me.


Jibberish indeed. But that comes straight out of a maths revision book i have.


if you only knew the stuff you needed to know, it would be a pretty sad waste of a life.

engineers or computer programmers or physicists need this stuff professionally, but the systematic problem solving skills required to work the stuff out are required by everyone.


First part is a matter of opinion. I personally wouldnt feel like ive wasted anything in life if i didnt know what i dont really need to know. Granted, some professions require an excellent skill for maths, i respect that. But i dont need to know anything more then the basic, for the simple reason that I wont be teaching it.

If i have learned anything from this thread its that the U.S education system seems to need a tweek in how they go about employing staff.




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