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Celebrated Solar House Left In The Dark

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posted on May, 16 2009 @ 09:41 AM
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Troy's celebrated solar house left in dark


It was supposed to be a shining example of the green movement -- a completely independent solar-powered house with no gas or electrical hookups.

Seven months ago, officials gathered for a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate the $900,000 house owned by the city of Troy that was to be used as an educational tool and meeting spot.

But it never opened to the public. And it remains closed.

Frozen pipes during the winter caused $16,000 in damage to floors, and city officials aren't sure when the house at the Troy Community Center will open.

Lawrence Technological University, with help from DTE, mostly paid for the building. Its students built the 800-square-foot home, which was supposed to be livable year-round, free from the grid and churn out enough solar power to support a home-based business and electric vehicle.


A $900k 800 sq ft home? Is this what the federal government wants to pour our money into? Think the term for this is 'money pit', isn't it?




posted on May, 16 2009 @ 09:52 AM
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If it costs alot of money, and has no promise of a future, you can bet your *ss the gov't is going to give it a ton of money!



posted on May, 16 2009 @ 11:55 PM
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I think the point of putting money into it is so that in the future it won't be a 900k 800 square foot house. Imagine if every new endeavor was met with the same argument that you just put up.

"You want to spend HOW much money to sail around the world?"



posted on May, 17 2009 @ 12:09 AM
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Originally posted by mattifikation
I think the point of putting money into it is so that in the future it won't be a 900k 800 square foot house. Imagine if every new endeavor was met with the same argument that you just put up.

"You want to spend HOW much money to sail around the world?"


I don't think it'd be such a bad story if the $900k 800 square foot house actually worked, rather than being a total disaster.



posted on May, 17 2009 @ 12:37 AM
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The University of Minnesota Underground Space Research Center has underground and solar home design and engineering down to a science. Even some of the pre-fab solar home manufacturers have some great designs. There's even a cottage industry of individual contractors who'll install a photovoltaic system complete with inverter, you can sell electricity back to the electrical grid.

Yet get the government involved and watch it all fall apart in red tape and ineptitude. Feds have even begun to curtail the tax breaks awarded to owners of solar homes.

Hell, pick up some passive or active solar home books from the 1970's, when the oil crisis first started, plenty of research done and published back then, but it went nowhere for the past 30, almost 40 years now - we're still building as grossly inefficient homes as ever. Then again, efficient energy saving homes would upset the energy markets, best not tamper with the golden goose, even if it means sticking the average home owner with $300-400 a month in utilities.



posted on May, 17 2009 @ 12:08 PM
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And Christopher Columbus' attempt to sail around the world didn't work either, now did it? There's an old saying, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again."

Look how much money humankind spent attempting to achieve flight before it finally happened. Imagine if they'd given up because of just one failed experiment that cost too much?

That 900k taught us something. Don't let the pipes freeze. :-)



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