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Earth's Spin Slowing, but Time Speeding Up?

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posted on May, 13 2009 @ 03:00 PM
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I don't understand how our perception of time is accelerating but the earth is slowing it's spin. Wouldn't this make the days feel longer and time feel slower?

Why is it that time feels faster then?




posted on May, 13 2009 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by SeeingBlue
 


HaHa!!! Time 'speeding up'? It's called "growing older".

The Earth is slowing its rotation by just a few microseconds per year, as we give up angular momentum to the Moon, which is moving away at about 2-3 cm every year, on average.

Both of these figures are virtually unable to be discerned by mere Human perception.

BUT, it is about perception. When you're busy, time 'flies'. When bored...well....



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 03:46 PM
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One should not waste or pass time, one should emrace it !


But , why would you think that time goes faster and the earth spins down ???

Put forth some links !



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 03:48 PM
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the earth is getting larger, so might that speed up the time?
liner twoer.



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 03:53 PM
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Well . . . Jesus prayed that the days would shorten in the end, otherwise we would not make it through the coming tribulation . . .



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by ChemBreather
 


I wasn't trying to prove anything. This is just for the people that already agree.

I was just thinking about the crossing of the galaxies horizontal center, is it related to the slowing of the Earth's spin? At the moment of crossing, is this when we stop for a day or so? Then what.. do we spin the other direction due to reversed magnetic polarity?



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 04:02 PM
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okay im not very up to date on this subject, but it interests me none the less. so, it has been proven that the rate at which the earth rotates is slowing down? let me ask you this...if so, is the rate of deceleration of the earth's spin increasing and at what rate, is it linear or exponential?



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 04:11 PM
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time is in fact speeding up. it takes humanity shorter and shorter amounts of time to innovate themselves. especially in the last hundreds years... evetually this acceleration will get to a middle point and then what? perhaps it coincides with the galactic alignment in 2012?



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 04:16 PM
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Two days ago I noticed that time was slowing down. It rarely happens but it's cool. Maybe it's all in the head.



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 04:22 PM
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I've been wondering about some things that we think we know about the Universe. Scientists now say that the Universe is constantly getting bigger so this means it started exponentially smaller like atom size or smaller. If the Earth is getting bigger this would absolutly alter the length of time any given point is accesable to the sun in essence altering time. I'm not talking about how long a second is but how many seconds are in each day. Even a small rate of change would end up being a large change when added to the change that has already occured. It takes longer for a marked point on a 20" tire to make a full revolution than an 18" that is spinning at the same rate and that amount of time grows more as you increase the size it only seems logical that the same thing applies to the Earth and the rest of the Universe also. If this is true how do we compensate for these changes ? While they are miniscule when added up over the years it could equal some signifigant changes that have occured and continue to occur as we speak

I remember as a child Daylight Savings Time actually gave us more time in the evening as I had to beat the streetlights and it didn't get dark until about 9:00 in the summer, while now it's dark by 7:30 or so.

I'm sure we will get some good explinations here by much smarter people than myself and I can't wait for the insight.



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 04:22 PM
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reply to post by SeeingBlue
 


To answer your question...NO!

This notion of 'crossing the Galactic Plane' is a bunch of hooey.

Our Solar System, as a group, is moving as it orbits the Galactic center at about 220 KPS. Compare that to the speed of light, 300,000 KPS.

Let's do some math: At 220KPS you are travelling at 792,000KPH.

One Light Year is 9,460,800,000,000 KM in length. That's 9.5 TRILLION km.

Working that out, at 792,000KPH it takes 11,945,454 hours to travel that LY.

That is 497,727 days, or about 1,364 YEARS!!!

SO, unless you're Methuselah, you really have nothing to worry about.

OH...and the Earth slowing to a stop, then reversing?? That was from the Superman movie. It's a fantasy, folks!!!



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by TheCoffinman
 


i dont think it is necessarily time that is speeding up, rather, the amount of time between important innovations and paridigm shifts is decreasing at an exponential rate



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 04:25 PM
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reply to post by BrainPower
 


BP, as I said up above, the Earth's spin is slowing by a few microseconds per year. THIS is because as the Moon's gravity tugs at the Earth some angular momentum is transferred to the Moon. Thus, the Moon is slighty going faster in its orbit, and as a result is gradually spiraling away. Don't worry, though...it's only about 2-3 cm per year.



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 04:32 PM
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so from this transfer of angular momentum, the moon is moving into a wider orbit and eventually will escape its ties to the earth then? any ideas as to how much the earth's rotation would slow down by if the moon does in fact escape the gravity of the earth?



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by wastedown
 


wastedown, you said:

If the Earth is getting bigger this would absolutly alter the length of time any given point is accesable to the sun in essence altering time.


Most important word in that sentence is 'IF'. The Earth is NOT getting bigger. If it were, it would be immediately noticed. Ever heard of GPS? Airplanes??? Everything would be thrown off.

Also, the only reason we know with any accuracy of the Earth's spin slowing ina way that is normally imperceptable to Humans is by using the Atomic clocks.



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


So what you are saying is that as fault lines move and expand and more of the Earth's liquid center breaks the surface, cools and expands has no effect on it's overall size?

I understand that everything in the Universe is getting further away from where it started. Is that all the hoopla is about with the recent findings that the Universe started out WAY smaller? Everything was one giant Planet, Star, or Whatever it was... Big Bang....What we see today? Everything I've read on the subject ( mostly from ATS threads and linked articles ) says that it all was "Smaller" not closer together.

I'm not trying to be combative or argue just looking for clarification.



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by BrainPower
 


Well, just crunching some numbers...I didn't check Wiki yet.

But, based on the current rate, every 37,000 years the Moon is about one KM farther. However, this rate is likely not constant. When the Earh/Moon system was formed, billions of years ago, they were both rotating around each other at a much faster rate, from the force of the collision with another celestial body during the formation of the Solar System. (This is a prevailing theory of the Moon's creation).

the Moon has had a positive influence on Earth...we used to rotate about twice as fast millions of years ago (time of the dinosaurs).

Millions or Billions of years in the future, when the Moon wanders off...well, hard to say what will happen to Earth. Prolly doesn't matter, eh??

edit: Adding this, to see if it works...
upload.wikimedia.org...

Also from Wiki:
The relative sizes and separation of the Earth–Moon system are shown to scale above. The beam of light is depicted travelling between the Earth and the Moon in the same time it actually takes light to scale the real distance between them: 1.255 seconds at its mean orbital distance. The light beam helps provide the sense of scale of the Earth-Moon system relative to the Sun, which is 8.28 light-minutes away (photosphere to Earth surface).


(I thought this was way cool)

I like this one too:

upload.wikimedia.org...

Taken from 50,000,000 KM away by the asteroid probe 'Deep Impact'.




[edit on 5/13/0909 by weedwhacker]



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by wastedown
 



So what you are saying is that as fault lines move and expand and more of the Earth's liquid center breaks the surface, cools and expands has no effect on it's overall size?


What you're referring to is Plate Tectonics. Some plates slide along each other, some are moving apart. BUT, as two move apart (such as the North American and European plates) somewhere else they are 'subducting' underneath another plate. This is, for example, happening in the Pacific...the so-called 'Ring of Fire'.

Example:
upload.wikimedia.org...



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


I think I understand what you are saying, but I don't think it's that simple. We dig for fossils, when the creature died it was on the surface and now it is found 30 meters into the soil did the Earth not gain 30 meters of thickness since the creature died. When a volcano erupts does it not drop lava that turns into rock therfore more surface area? Using the ring of fire example, does the creation of say a new Island not add mass to the surface or the ocean floor which is in essance the surface? If I am completly off track I thank you for helping me get back on.

edit:
sorry i have to run will pick up here tomorrow. Thank you

[edit on 13-5-2009 by wastedown]



posted on May, 13 2009 @ 05:21 PM
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reply to post by wastedown
 


Well, thanks for the question. Just saw a special on Nat Geo last night about mountain-building. Sometimes plates subduct, other times they pile up against each, building mountains.

The special was focused on the Alps. Millions of years ago the African plate moved north against the European plate. Thus, mountains. There was an acient sea in between (pre-dates the Mediterranean) so the sedimentary layers, complete with fossils, fromteh bottom of that sea are now thousands of feet up in the Alps.



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