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NASA's Most Dangerous Mission Ever, set for tomorrow 5/11/09- being stranded in space possible

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posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by SvenTheBerserK
If they did not fix the telescope and let it fail,how many people would complain about the wasted money put into it?

Sometimes it just makes more sense to fix something rather than replace it.

To the poster that called us stupid..thanks for having such a high opinion about us...Why are you here?


LOL LOL LOL...

Think beyond ones ego programming here. Sorry to be what seems harsh..but someone is willing to sacrafice..not one but two shuttles in this repair.

This bespeaks of a urgency beyond just a simple repair. Beyond looking into outer space.

Think..dont emote.

Thanks,
Orangetom




posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:01 PM
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About ready to blast off!!

nice pictures of it on NASA TV and Cnn



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:06 PM
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She's up and going well!

Looks like the NASA tv feed is delayed by some considerable time - I can see the curvature of the Earth now.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:07 PM
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hoooooray at least the launch went off with out a hitch, now for the risky stuff.....



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by Now_Then
 


Very long delay I noticed, so I switched the viewing on their page to "media T.V" compared to "public TV" - no delay there.

Watching it on TV and computer.

Very nice take off - very smooth, no problems.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:12 PM
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Anyone know what a transducer is?

Thanks for the tip on the media channel, cnn cut their coverage almost as soon as it lifted off for Pentagon crap.

I love watching these things lift off, very exciting. I so hope they are able to repair Hubble, I love every image that baby has ever sent home. Now nothing on the feed but mission control.

I hope they will get the feed back soon.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:15 PM
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woo they made it! love watching launches

Get that thing fixed and get back home! so we can enjoy some more photos from way out there.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:16 PM
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Originally posted by redhead57
Anyone know what a transducer is?

Thanks for the tip on the media channel, cnn cut their coverage almost as soon as it lifted off for Pentagon crap.

I love watching these things lift off, very exciting. I so hope they are able to repair Hubble, I love every image that baby has ever sent home. Now nothing on the feed but mission control.

I hope they will get the feed back soon.


i heard them say its not important as they arent watching the alerts for it now?



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by orangetom1999
 


Astronauts have been willing to sacrifice themselves for knowledge and discovery for about the last 50 years.

Whats so different now?

Edit: 4.30am im goin to bed. Night all

[edit on 11-5-2009 by SvenTheBerserK]



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by SvenTheBerserK
 


Come on, the Hubble has been operational since early 1990s, there is no way it can be considered a waste of money for non-military purpose, i think many scientists disagree.

"On 24 April 1990, shuttle mission STS-31 saw Discovery launch the telescope successfully into its planned orbit.[43]" /Wikipedia



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by orangetom1999
 


wow dude lay off the coffee! hubble is super special, and they had this planned for years now.

pakistan isnt important enough to cancel space missions... why hasnt anyone figured that out yet?

and anyone looking for immediate payoff is kind of silly when that rationale applies to the government. when has anything payed off except the science stuff (including military science too). science is so much more important than some dumb apes throwing rocks at each other!



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:23 PM
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science is so much more important than some dumb apes throwing rocks at each other!


Comical...but right on point... If we simply always concentrated on the peeing contest d'jour...we'd have never gotten anywhere...and kudos for those who take the ultimate risk (namely their lives) in the search for discovery....



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:26 PM
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reply to post by jkrog08
 


jkrog08,


I must agree with your post. It is ignorant to say that we shouldn't be exploring space because we have problems down here. When it reality major discoveries in space could fix a lot of these problems.


I am not debating the point of not exploring outer space or ceasing with astronomy. Not at all. We should indeed be doing these things.

I am saying that there is a cover up here ..a conspiracy if you like.

I live right next to the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Right next to Langley Air Force Base. Lots of moon rocks to be found in this area.
I build submarines and aircraft carriers for a living ..including doing nuclear work in the reactors. Technology is not a new thing to me.

One does not spend billions and billions of dollars on a sattelite and then billions more to put it in orbit just to look into outer space. To look at a place where one will not be able to go for centuries with current propulsion methods. Not to mention traveling through areas of very high radiation.

The pay off must be more immediate to justify the expenses. Can the Hubble look out into deep space?? Most certainly. For that much moneys one had better have a very good depth of field.

How high up in orbit is the Hubble??? If it is normally close to the surface of the earth this should be an important clue. If you want to look into deep space ..why would one put it in low orbit?? Just a thought. 2 or 3 thousand miles up should be fine.
As I understand it ..satellites up some 20 thousand miles are usually geo syncronous orbits..in sinc with the rotation of the earth. Othewise signals must be bounced off other satellites or ground stations to get to the satellite.

Well nonetheless..I am not arguing for cessation of space exploration..only that there is something bogus about the hubble telescope and this maintenance operation. I do not believe the hubble is the only satellite of this type that we have out in space. But I do believe we have learned much from the successes and failures of the Hubble.
I do indeed believe that these satellites are hugely expensive ..both to build and then put into orbit.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:32 PM
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So where's the feed gone? They keep on looping the launch but the sporadic audio seems live, albeit very sparse.

Is there a cockpit webcam feed?

Public money pays for this and it should be a public event.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:35 PM
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that was the first time i was able to watch the launch. I just want to say thank you OP for the link. i did not know it existed. My prayers are with them. May they stay safe. S&F



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:38 PM
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OK well.. yes Hubble is expensive, and taking pictures is what it does best. But saying that its not good enough to support the cost of it is kind of a bad argument. some people would claim that the pictures taken are priceless and we need these to understand more of what is going on out there.

besides other satellites that have done very little for public monitoring.

Cassini-Huygens is really expensive, and it never even got a chance to watch people pee, or triggered a response when someone said bomb.


The total cost of the mission is about US$3.26 billion, including $1.4 billion for pre-launch development, $704 million for mission operations, $54 million for tracking and $422 million for the launch vehicle. The US contributed $2.6 billion, ESA $500 million and ASI $160 million.

wiki source: cassini

hell all its doing is flying around Saturn looking at water jets and hexagons. (i do really know there is much more going on, but for basis of argument)

and i dont know, maybe my mind control beacon is working a little too well, but i think its taking some great pictures.

i just think its too easy to launch a spy satellite without anyone knowing/caring from sea, and that if you were going to make a satellite with a household name, I wouldnt make it my super secret spy on everyone one.

oh and hubble is 350 miles up... ISS is only 250miles. so its pretty high up there.

[edit on 5/11/2009 by mahtoosacks]



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:38 PM
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Originally posted by orangetom1999
reply to post by jkrog08
 

One does not spend billions and billions of dollars on a sattelite and then billions more to put it in orbit just to look into outer space.

Happens all the time, actually. Hubble is neither the first nor the last space telescope.

How high up in orbit is the Hubble??? If it is normally close to the surface of the earth this should be an important clue. If you want to look into deep space ..why would one put it in low orbit?? Just a thought. 2 or 3 thousand miles up should be fine.

The altitude of hubble's orbit will not affect its view in the slightest. Placing it "a thousand miles" closer to the stars will not make a dent in viewing objects that are light years away. As for viewing the earth, we already have spy sats the size of hubble that view the earth 24/7. That's a known fact, even if their exact camera specs are classified. There's no need to try hide just one more of the same by calling a space sat, and if that were the case we wouldn't have access to hubble's raw data.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:44 PM
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reply to post by PrisonerOfSociety
 


nasa channel is the only source for once the shuttle is up and on out, at least that i know.

once they get in their grove up there, they should come on camera and say hey and pat each other on the back, and describe a little about what they are doing.

but as for 24/7 feed from inside/outside/around the shuttle, i wish....



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:57 PM
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hmm..




im not worried for ex-stunt pilot, he will have beings from the source helping him and his 6 co-pilots.




this may be the moment of contact, for it is bound to happen very soon



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 01:57 PM
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Well...

All I can do is wish the best of luck to them and a safe return.




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