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NASA's Most Dangerous Mission Ever, set for tomorrow 5/11/09- being stranded in space possible

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posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:03 AM
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Here's mission control audio:

www.nasa.gov...




posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:07 AM
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reply to post by PrisonerOfSociety
 


I have seen all launches. Sad thing is the first one I saw was The Challenger when I just moved here. Sometimes I dont watch. I grew up here so sometimes the shuttle going off doesnt really phase the locals, we are use to it. If I can get outside I do. The night ones are the best. The light up the whole sky esp watching from the beach.


To the poster who said we are all stupid for thinking they are really fixing Hubble was that really necessary? I do think there is more to it but of course they wont tell us.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:12 AM
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i think there going to be airing this in the science channel or the discovery channel, one of the two. I remember seeing previews for repairing Hubble live, or something like that, hopefully it will be a good watch, and i really hope nothing bad happens to those astronauts


I have to agree with someone else PR theory, maybe the 1st shuttle will have a big problem and the 2nd will have to save them.

That would be the most exciting nail biting event since Apollo 13


great attention for NASA.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:16 AM
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To the poster that asked if there is a delay on the online feed. I just checked it out. I have the TV on the NASA channel and the webpage up too.

There seems to be about a 1 1/2 minute to 2 minute delay from what's broadcast on TV. The streaming on the web is delayed.

I know on my cable service that NASA is channel 25, I'm through resort cable.

Now to get the 3 year old to stop complaining that this isn't Dora the Explorer, I'll be set!



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:23 AM
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Originally posted by teflon_superhero
Now to get the 3 year old to stop complaining that this isn't Dora the Explorer, I'll be set!


Thanks for the heads up teflon_superhero.

Perhaps your 3yo will see Santa Claus as the launch transpires



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:27 AM
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Originally posted by PrisonerOfSociety

Originally posted by teflon_superhero
Now to get the 3 year old to stop complaining that this isn't Dora the Explorer, I'll be set!


Thanks for the heads up teflon_superhero.

Perhaps your 3yo will see Santa Claus as the launch transpires


That's a great idea! I've been telling him "Look, they're going to get into that big shuttle and go zoom into space!"

He's starting to get more interested now. I really would love him to chill enough to see the launch, I think he'd really enjoy it. Hopefully as much as I love it.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:30 AM
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Let's look at the mission specialists NASA has selected for the mission:

    Michael Good - Air Force test pilot background.

    Megan McArthur - Megan conducted graduate research in nearshore underwater acoustic propagation and digital signal processing.

    Andrew Fuestel - Feustel’s Ph.D. thesis investigated seismic wave attenuation in underground mines and measurement techniques and applications to site characterization.

    Michael Massimino - Robotocist (probable robotic arm operator).

    John Grunsfeld - Dr. Grunsfeld studied binary pulsars and energetic x-ray and gamma ray sources using the NASA Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, x-ray astronomy satellites, radio telescopes, and optical telescopes including the NASA Hubble Space Telescope.


Two of the specialists have background in geoscientific fields; oceanography and geology respectively. Does anyone know if the shuttle will be undertaking any other secondary missions other than Hubble repair?
If not, then the selection of Fuestel and McArthur are interesting. .


[edit on 5/11/2009 by clay2 baraka]



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by Ignorance Denied
Well if you believe there going up there to fix hubble, then you guys are alot more stupid than i first thought..


What do you mean, please explain to someone that doesnt know. I have a question regarding Kepler (NASA), does the information we receieve from Kepler plus ESA Planck render the Hubble telescope obsolete ?



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:38 AM
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you guys can watch this live here...

T-minus 45 minutes and counting!


Everything going kind of smooth now. preparing for ice last i heard. but still counting away.

Good Luck To Everyone on board! FIX THAT HUBBLE!

wonder what the flat-earth believers say about astronauts going to space and flying AROUND us lol



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:40 AM
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post by Ignorance Denied
 


Sounds like THIS guy has some information he wants to share, what with his clearance for In-The-Know that he MUST have?

wanna tell us whats really going on??

Edit: bet he must have all the answers from nasa being in ireland and all


[edit on 5/11/2009 by mahtoosacks]



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:40 AM
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In this day and age of massive budget deficits , continuing war and conflict,what is happening in Pakistan with the Taliban, Nuclear weapons proliferation, and all other things of more importance than looking out into solar systems and galaxies in the universe....Why is repairing the Hubble Telescope of such importance so as to risk a crew ..and even another shuttle??

Of what use is data on outer space..galaxies and the universe??? I say this in view of other things of more importance happening here on earth??
What can be of such a high priority against the risks/expenses involved??

Or are they actually looking out into outer space??

I have said for years and years now..the true purpose of the Hubble Telescope is to look down here on the earth..day and night. Not to look into deep space.

They spent way to much money in developing and maintaining the Hubble Telescope to waste it on an outerspace venture for which any propulsion/travel systems sufficient for the job will not be available for centuries. So what are you going to do with all these colourful gaseous photos and informations gleened by the hubble of galaxies at such huge expense?

No...the payoff must be something more immediate and gratifying. The only immediatte payoff verses expenses..would be looking down here on earth. The true purpose of the Hubble is for power and control of what is happeneing down here on earth..not in deep space. In otherwords..politics...not science.

The reason the powers that be can sell the Hubble to the public on such a rediculous notion is that we have been spoon fed so much Star Wars, Star Trek and other such Si Fi nonsense that so many are carried away with the religion of science and mans greatness.
These peoples cannot think outside the box and realize that much of the religion of science has been hijacked and subordinated to another more powerful religion..the religion of Politics. Politics ..funds much of science and hence science does what politics commands. Notr a difficult concept to understand. But most will never understand the concept when they are primarily educated in front of a television set or movie screen which tend to do all ones thinking for them.

The primary purpose of the Hubble Telescope is to look down here and help with control of the earth..not outer space. This is a definition of politics..not science.

It is the only reason which would justify the urgency and huge risk/expense of this planned mission.

I knew nothing about this story until checking on ATS today. Immediately warning flags came up in my mind and I knew what was happening. Had I not checked ATS I would never have known about this shuttle mission as I watch so little television.

Thanks,
Orangetom

[edit on 11-5-2009 by orangetom1999]



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:48 AM
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If they did not fix the telescope and let it fail,how many people would complain about the wasted money put into it?

Sometimes it just makes more sense to fix something rather than replace it.

To the poster that called us stupid..thanks for having such a high opinion about us...Why are you here?



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 11:53 AM
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reply to post by orangetom1999
 




the true purpose of the Hubble Telescope is to look down here on the earth..day and night. Not to look into deep space.


Courtesy of a post by Badge01

sm3a.gsfc.nasa.gov...

It is true that the Hubble Space Telescope can see things very clearly - one can argue that it provides the clearest view of the sky in visible light "colors" that humans have ever had. However, its capabilities are still limited by the laws of physics. For a telescope with a circular collecting area of diameter D (2.4 m for Hubble), the smallest feature that one can resolve at wavelength L (550 x 10^-9 m for visible light) is given roughly by: resolution = 1.4 L/D = 3.2 x 10^-7 radians This estimate gives the "diffraction limited" resolution, or the resolution based on light's wave-like characteristics. It is difficult to improve upon this limit. The distance to the Moon is roughly 240,000 miles. Hubble's resolution corresponds to a physical dimension of size = x = 0.08 miles = 405 feet = 124 meters at the Moon's surface ... roughly the size of a football field. This is quite a bit larger than any of the artifacts you would want to see on the lunar surface, so even Hubble's tremendous clarity is not enough for what you would like to do! If we had an aircraft carrier at the lunar surface, then Hubble could probably get a pretty good look at it.


Surely, as humans we are just being nurtured in the womb of Mother Earth; our true destiny lies in the stars and the cosmic dust from whence we came!

[edit on 11-5-2009 by PrisonerOfSociety]



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 12:11 PM
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reply to post by clay2 baraka
 


Wow - thank you for that information on the crew!! Good work uncovering some of who they are.

It is interesting what their backgrounds are, and it doesn't seem logical choices for fixing the Hubble telescope.

I don't believe NASA discloses everything in the first place - so what were the reasonings behind those choices of people?

Star for YOU!



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 12:16 PM
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what is that shadow that seems to take over the image (on the live webstream) every seven seconds or so? is that an artifact of the codec or what? anyone know? i know what it looks like when quicktime is refreshing or whatver but thats kinda wierd, at first il thought it was clouds or something



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by orangetom1999
 


I agree somewhat, I know the Hubble has provided the most amazing photos of outer space - "the eye" "the hand" "where galaxies form" - I love looking at the photos. I know it is expensive too - but it has been in space a couple of decades - so I assume it has paid for itself by now.

What I have a problem with - is they feel it is SO important they are willing to risk 7 lives to fix it PLUS 7 more lives - if something happens to the first crew. The photos are awesome, but question... do they change our lives by looking at them - or are they just interesting pictures?

So in asking that question - life changing on Earth pictures or just interesting pictures? Then is it worth lives to do a mission that could possibly cost lives, besides the huge amount of money involved?



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by orangetom1999
In this day and age of massive budget deficits , continuing war and conflict,what is happening in Pakistan with the Taliban, Nuclear weapons proliferation, and all other things of more importance than looking out into solar systems and galaxies in the universe....Why is repairing the Hubble Telescope of such importance so as to risk a crew ..and even another shuttle??

So we should stop doing astronomy because terrorists are causing trouble? Shuttle crews risk their lives for science on every mission, not just this one, and it's not like the shuttle could be put to an alternative use fixing any of the problems you described. And if Hubble isn't really observing space at all, where are those fantastic images coming from? If you've ever looked at hubble's raw unprocessed images, you can tell how real they are. The things hubble has seen have been confirmed more recently by telescopes on the ground as well.


Of what use is data on outer space..galaxies and the universe??? I say this in view of other things of more importance happening here on earth??
What can be of such a high priority against the risks/expenses involved??

Discoveries out there can lead to advances down here. Just because you can't understand the motivation doesn't mean there can't be a sufficient motivator for the astronauts involved.

[edit on 11-5-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 12:34 PM
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How is this the most dangerous mission ever? If this is the case then is this NASA inadvertantly stating that we did not go to the moon? I would figure that that would be the most dangerous mission ever. Hmm this is kind of odd.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 12:42 PM
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What a coincedence that one of the 3 new gadgets they are putting onto the hubble is a pan-cromatic camera....since all the ufos and things like that are best seen with an infra red camera.

This is good maybe we are soon to see some pictures they claim to have "just shot" with stuff they have never seen before...to cover their previous lies.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


I must agree with your post. It is ignorant to say that we shouldn't be exploring space because we have problems down here. When it reality major discoveries in space could fix a lot of these problems. It is humans destiny to go and reach the stars, when we do it doesn't matter, we are very young in our evolution. We have only been in the space age for 50 years and already have made great progress. Just because we can't go to the stars now that means we shouldn't observe them and learn from them, all that will lead us to technology that will get us to the stars!

We have to start somewhere, we can't just magically start flying warp 9 spacecraft around in real life. Knowledge is built upon foundations and layers.



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