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Google and others urge inventory of national airwaves

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posted on May, 8 2009 @ 10:13 PM
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In a rare show of unity over national communications policy, Google, the wireless industry and consumer advocates have come together to support a bill that would require the federal government to take a complete inventory of the national airwaves to determine what spectrum is being used, how it is being used and who is using it.

source

I'm always suspicious when the feds determine that it's time to audit anything. The fact that this comes at Google's behest is even more concerning. Add this to the repeated and ongoing attempts by the government to control the internet and you've got yourself a plot to control all forms of communication. Why do they wish to control every medium of information distribution available to the general public? I have a few theories but i would like to hear what others have to say.


TA

[edit on 8-5-2009 by TheAssociate]




posted on May, 8 2009 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by TheAssociate
 


I think this is the prelude to an eminent-domain style spectrum landgrab...seizing frequencies from small old established users and reassigning them to bigshots for "greater efficiency", no doubt with money involved...



posted on May, 8 2009 @ 11:00 PM
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The new law, if passed, would require the Federal Communications Commission and the National Telecommunications & Information Administration to report on the use of all spectrum bands between 300 megahertz and 3.5 gigahertz, including information on the licenses or government user operating in each band and whether the spectrum is actually in use.

"There needs to be a very specific accounting not only of what spectrum is being used, but who is using it," said John Walls, a spokesman for CTIA.

The unusual alliance between Google and public interest groups and big telecommunications companies may be temporary. The telecom companies want to have the opportunity to buy a license to use any extra spectrum at an auction, as has traditionally been done.

Google, on the other hand, advocates the use of new technologies that would allow the spectrum to be shared by whoever needs it.

same source

I too get concerned when the government tries to do anything. I always remember Ronald Reagan telling us --The nine most terrifying words in the english language are "I'm from the government, and I'm here to help."

In this case I'm not sure how this is bad. Aside from the corporation being able to get more control so as to sell the use of the spectrum back to us. I don't see where knowing who was using what frequency would impact a regular person. Unless I am missing something.

If they are so worried about more open airwave frequencies. Didn't we just free up all of the analog TV spectrum? oh wait, they need those for the chip. (couldn't resist)

But seriously, They really might be planning to use those for the chip, but thats another topic. As far as this goes, the airwaves are already owned by the government, and controlled by the military so we alreaady only get whats left over and the fight is on for the scraps. I worked for a garage door opener company and it was a storm when the military took back the same frequency that the remotes were on for some inter base chatter capabilities because of 9/11. Everyone within 50 or so miles from a base would find their doors opening at random or not working at all due to this.

This fight has been on for a while

The commercial wireless industry has had an almost insatiable appetite for more airwaves, especially the mobile telephone companies that want to offer high-speed Internet access service and for wireless Internet access points, known as Wi-Fi hotspots.

But they have faced difficulties wrestling airwaves away from the U.S. government, which recently has had a growing need to meet new security and military needs and refused to give up existing spectrum unless comparable airwaves are found.

Wired 2003 story



posted on May, 8 2009 @ 11:12 PM
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reply to post by AlienChaser
 





I don't see where knowing who was using what frequency would impact a regular person.


I was thinking in terms of a SHTF situation. It may, at some point, be necessary to use radio to communicate vital info among us regular folk and it seems this would impede that ability.

It could just be the caffeine.


Thanks for the reply, post starred.


TA



posted on May, 8 2009 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by TheAssociate
 


I was thinking in terms of a SHTF situation. It may, at some point, be necessary to use radio to communicate vital info among us regular folk and it seems this would impede that ability.

I thought of that too. Then I started thinking that they already have the capability jam or override a signal.

Imagine the S has just hit the F and you are trying to organize a survival or restance group and you switch on your phone or nextel or your 20 mile motorola walkie talkie or your home base CB, and you hear "Good news Oceania has just won a decisive victory over Eurasia..."

edit: made it a link

[edit on 5/8/2009 by AlienChaser]



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