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Streptococcus suis type2 is the same thing as the swine flu we are experiencing now?

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posted on May, 7 2009 @ 07:22 PM
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www.rense.com...

I found this article on the swine flu. It is an illness that comes from pigs. I read in another article that 204 people in China got this and 38 died. That is an 18.6% mortality rate. As you can see the date was 2005 before this outbreak. The article furthmore states that human infections are rare. What is the difference between our current swine flu, H1N1 and this diease; is it the same thing. If it is then we may have bigger problems than intially thought. I am trying to do some research on the swine flu and the odd thing is I get articles dating before 2009. I know they said they do not believe the current strain came from pigs but they called it swine flu for a reason. I did a search before I posted to make sure this was not covered yet. Has anyone heard of Streptococcus suis? How relevant is it the current outbreak? It makes me wander why this virus spread so rapidly when it is rare in humans in the first place.




posted on May, 7 2009 @ 07:44 PM
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well wen the media hypes something up overly too much some idiots/germaphobes/paranoid people will think they have it, and in turn they will get it if they keep thinking they got it. Law of Attraction and psychosimantics.



posted on May, 7 2009 @ 07:49 PM
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No. Streptococcus suis type 2 is a bacteria. H1N1 is a virus.

Pigs are an occasional vector for many human pathogens including:

Bacteria: Bacillus anthracis–anthrax, Brucella suis, Clostridium botulinum–botulism, C perfringens–pigbel, Flavobacterium group IIb-like bacteria, Leptospirosis, Pasteurella aerogenes, Pasteurella multocida, Salmonella cholerae-suis–salmonellosis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae (group L), Streptococcus milleri, Streptococcus suis type 2 (group R), Yersinia enterocolitica, Y pseudotuberculosis

Parasites: Ascaris suum, cryptosporidiosis, Entamoeba polecki, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, Fasciolopsis buski, sarcocystosis, scabies, Taenia solium, Trichinella spiralis,

Viruses: Influenza, rabies, swine influenzae, swine vesicular disease.

and many more...

BTW. I am having pork for dinner. mmmmmm...Pork...

[edit on 7-5-2009 by tamusan]

[edit on 7-5-2009 by tamusan]



posted on May, 7 2009 @ 07:50 PM
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thanks for the clarification so the strep is a bacterial infection as opposed to a flu. So in calling strep suis type 2 the swine flu that is a fallacy and a human misunderstanding.

[edit on 7-5-2009 by dreamseeker]



posted on May, 7 2009 @ 07:55 PM
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People can get bacteria or viruses from pigs (or any animal for that matter). People usually call anything that makes them sick the flu. People or pigs can have both Streptococcus suis type 2 and H1N1 at the same time. However, I don't believe you should read much into that. Wash your hands, cook your food and you should be fine. Oh and like the VP said, stay off of planes and trains.



posted on May, 7 2009 @ 07:58 PM
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Originally posted by dreamseeker
www.rense.com...

I found this article on the swine flu. It is an illness that comes from pigs. I read in another article that 204 people in China got this and 38 died. That is an 18.6% mortality rate. As you can see the date was 2005 before this outbreak. The article furthmore states that human infections are rare. What is the difference between our current swine flu, H1N1 and this diease; is it the same thing. If it is then we may have bigger problems than intially thought. I am trying to do some research on the swine flu and the odd thing is I get articles dating before 2009. I know they said they do not believe the current strain came from pigs but they called it swine flu for a reason. I did a search before I posted to make sure this was not covered yet. Has anyone heard of Streptococcus suis? How relevant is it the current outbreak? It makes me wander why this virus spread so rapidly when it is rare in humans in the first place.


Um, no.

First, Rense is a bad source. I can find an article on Rense about my former employer (StarTek) being some sort of NWO sweatshop. Being in an upper mgt position with them for 8 years, i can assure you that we were not a sweat shop. I started on the front line and was promoted several times. If anything, StarTek runs about the loosest ship i have seen in any call center (and i have seen a few in my day).

RE: the OP info....

"Swine flu" (or any other flu) is caused by a virus. Do some research on what a virus is (just Google it). It is really a non-living bunch of genetic material.

Strep is a bacteria. It is what causes things like "Strep throat", some boils and skin lesions, most toothaches, and is the primary "bug" in cases of bacterial meningitis. It is a form of life, unlike a virus.

Bacteria are treatable with most antibiotics. Even a first generation penicillin derivative such as ampicillin. It is also highly responsive to most sulfa based antibiotics. While there are drug resistent forms, strep is generally a weak bacterium and easily treated (even if it requires a more aggressive fourth gen penicillin derivative such as Levaquin or Augmentin)

Virus's are not treatable with antibiotics. If you go see the doctor when you have the flu and they give you antibiotics, you are wasting your money. It IS responsive to some drugs such as Tamiflu. But these don't work like antibiotics (which affect a bacterial colony nearly immediately, and display effectiveness within the patient within 12 hours). Tamiflu requires treatment early in the process, and will only shorten the length of illness, not cure it.



posted on May, 7 2009 @ 07:59 PM
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A virus and bacterium are very different types of cells. A virus such as influenza is not living, whereas a bacterium like streptococcus is. They cannot combine or reproduce with each other or anything of that nature, but as Tamusan said you can have both at one time. If you have one, it may weaken your immune system while you are recovering and make your more susceptible to the other. But that goes for all variants of infection.

But Tamusan did a very good job of explaining the differences.



posted on May, 7 2009 @ 08:02 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Thank you so much. I knew that I could get some straight forward answers on this. This information makes a lot of sense to me and clears it up. I know the internet is not always a realiable source. I have found in my 34 years of life that sometimes the sources we rely on like the news media etc are not correct. If there was link between the strep suis infection and H1N1 that really would complicate matters. I am glad that is not the case.



posted on May, 7 2009 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by dreamseeker
reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Thank you so much. I knew that I could get some straight forward answers on this. This information makes a lot of sense to me and clears it up. I know the internet is not always a realiable source. I have found in my 34 years of life that sometimes the sources we rely on like the news media etc are not correct. If there was link between the strep suis infection and H1N1 that really would complicate matters. I am glad that is not the case.


The only link i could fathom would be as an "Opportunity Infection", whereby someone weakened by a fight with a viral intruder would be more susceptible to the bacterial attack.



posted on May, 7 2009 @ 09:24 PM
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reply to post by dreamseeker
 


Certainly Strep (in all its varieties) is a bacterial organism, but isn't possible that it can follow a viral infection- no matter how "mild" it is claimed to be, just as bacterial pneumonia follows flu?-Bacterial infections are responsible for more deaths from "flu" than the virus, itself (unless the influenza strain contains virulence gens that cause a cytokine storm).

I guess all I'm saying is that a secondary bacterial infection might support the death rate in Mexico, if that particular strep strain is endemic there.

Docs everywhere who are prescribing antibiotics might know that and be attempting to prevent secondary infections. Or they're stupid and don't know the diff. b/w viral and bacterial infections. Time will tell..



posted on May, 7 2009 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by CultureD
 


This is what i am saying.

Swine Flu seems to be tied into the deaths of people in Mexico. Certainly, the US has had a death, and a few dozen cases. However, the overall impact outside of Mexico point to Swine Flu not being the cause of death but rather a possible contributing factor.

If you "spread" the immune system with multiple illnesses, just about anything can be fatal at some point. Add to this "spread" immune system the effects that stress has one people, and you might find that what happened in Mexico was due to a series of unfortunate events.

Consider that currently the economic and political environment in Mexico is teetering on complete failure and insolvency. Add to this the poor health care systems, poor water quality, malnutrition, abhorrent living conditions, and woeful hygeine...yeah, you have the exact environment that wiped out most of Europe during the plague.



posted on May, 9 2009 @ 05:04 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


You are absolutely correct. It's funny (sort of...)- I've studied plague (Yersinia pestis medievialis) for about 15 years and I'm writing a book about it. We forget- very quickly- that our word is comprised of an infinite number of ecologies for bugs to inhabit. The Black Death (as Victorians called it) killed nearly 1/2 of the world (when averaged), but the 1918 flu killed more per capita than any other infectious disease in written history. We ignore co-factors to illness at our peril (for example, there was an influenza epidemic some 25 years before the plague hit England- depressed immune responses resulted in a country loosing as many or more than any other in the first wave of plague in the 14th C.). We cannot discount developing nations-and when this does burn up, as is the case in ANY pandemic- the first to die will be those who have poor quality food and water, med support, etc. In the Jet Age, however, the equation is a little different- and more urgent to those who think they're safe in their colonials in central Michigan or Iowa or Ohio, etc.....................



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 05:41 PM
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the 1918 spanish flu pandemic is a subtype of H1N1. It was also called the swine flu at times. I wander if there is any correlation between that strain and the current one? I tried calling the cdc to ask questions along these lines and they hung up on me. They say this a new strain but why does it have similar names? They tried to say this was different than the 1976 outbreak but I asked about the 1918 pandemic. I knew the 1976 outbreak was not as bad. History does repeat itself. Why do I also keep hearing there is an avian competent to it yet the cdc denies this. In the begginning this could have been contained yet I don't think that it want to be contained. Something about this whole things doesn't sit well with me.



posted on May, 11 2009 @ 08:41 PM
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You're correct. I posted somewhere else on another thread that I had read an article that I can no longer find on Reuters and on CNN- both online- saying that people who survived the '18 pandemic would have immunity to this bug (if they're still alive). So, that tells me it's the same or a very similar clade. The reassortment is different, due to human and avian RNA, but who knows? We can only speculate. If you're feeling really brave you can look up the genetic sequence of this H1N1 and compare it to the 1918 sequence- all are posted on GenBank and other sites. It's a big job, and I'm sure molecular biologists are doing that right now. CDC won't cop to anything- they're trying to reduce panic- and to say they're the same would instigate it.
Of great concern about this are two things, in my opinion:

there's a seasonal H1N1 going around (subtype B) that is resistant to anti-virals, and if anyone is ill with this strain and exposed to an avian strain H5N1, reassortment could produce something worse than the 1918 strain. If I find any evidence of either I will post it to support my speculation.

Take good care



posted on May, 26 2009 @ 02:26 AM
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reply to post by CultureD
 


I am doing the genome mapping as we speak. I have noticed that there slight variations and changes. I can not find the 1918 genome sequence in the data base. I put in this Influenza A virus (A/New_York/1/18 (H1N1) in the search but nothing can you help me map it.

www.foxnews.com...

I read the above article and it leads me to believe they have the genome sequencing for the 1918 spanish flu. I bet it is similar.



posted on May, 26 2009 @ 02:35 AM
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reply to post by dreamseeker
 

I put in nfluenza A virus (A/New_York/1/18 (H1N1) and this was what was returned:
37813[gprj] AND "Influenza A virus (A/Mexico/4108/2009(H1N1))"[porgn]

Does this suggest a link?



posted on May, 26 2009 @ 02:56 PM
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I know this is old news that the two are related but I have known from the very beggining. When I heard the first news reports it sounded much like what my great grandmother talked about in 1918. I really just want to prove for myself that the cdc is hiding this info from the general public.



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