No infected pigs found in Mexico.

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posted on Apr, 30 2009 @ 11:35 PM
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The problem I see with that link (I also read through the reference from the link) is that if the virus was in waste, then the pigs there should have tested positive. It is possible that the virus didn't make the pigs sick, they were acting as carriers, but they should have tested positive. As closely packed as they keep the pigs in any large corporate farm most if not all of the pigs should have had it and continually passed it on to the new pigs coming into the farm, unless the farm slaughtered all of the pigs, did a complete disinfection protocol, and then moved new ones in which I doubt.

This doesn't exclude the possibility that Smithfield Foods bribed those responsible for the testing to make sure the results were negative.

I am assuming that they mean the flys carried the virus on their bodies and were not infected, right? Because a virus that could go from insect to mammal is supposed to not be possible. Of course, the Baxter influenza that killed the ferrets shouldn't have been possible either, but insect to mammal...yikes!

How long can the virus survive in the waste without getting into a host to replicate? Does anyone know?




posted on Apr, 30 2009 @ 11:43 PM
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I didn't read anything where they found the virus infecting the flys?! Did I miss that in the article and in the reference?? They stated a vector which means that flys carrying the virus on their bodies from the waste. If that is true.... it would be unpresidented right, insect to mammal?





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