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Swine Flu news and updates thread

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posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 11:59 AM
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reply to post by Destroyed
 


Just wait till the six-fingered farmers in Ireland, start getting 'friendly' with their swine or sheep flock




posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by PrisonerOfSociety
 


oh haha very funny

Hey my dad owns sheep



posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by Destroyed
 


I really do have to refrain from comment on that one



posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 01:49 PM
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INFOBAE

Changes in the influenza virus that creates painful symptoms

Hospital director Malvinas Argentinas, Graciela Bonfigli, C5N explained that patients who are now in serious condition suffering from acute renal failure and hematologic disorders


Graciela Bonfigli, director of the Hospital Malvinas Argentinas, instead aiming only to patients who have the virus AH1N1 spoke exclusively with C5N and explained that, in very serious cases, two new diseases in patients.

According to the doctor, the influenza A virus affects more than a common flu because it brings additional tables.

Those who are in serious condition for being victims of the virus AH1N1 Two new symptoms that were not being taken into account. The first is acute renal failure, which has to be helped by dialysis. The second consequence is the occurrence of hematological abnormalities, such as when blood clots form throughout the body.

Bonfigli explained that may not yet have an explanation because the virus continues to mutate constantly Furthermore argued that if patients have no prior history, they are generally healthy adults who have a fall with pneumonia and respiratory failure.



posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 02:28 PM
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www.cidrap.umn.edu...

Link is to a report on the early days of the Mexican outbreak published in the New England Journal of Medecine.


Novel H1N1 influenza can cause severe respiratory illness, profound lung damage, and death even in patients with no underlying conditions to make them vulnerable, a team of physicians from Mexico report in a rush article published online today by the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

The analysis of 18 patients hospitalized with H1N1 (swine) flu at the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases (INER) in Mexico during the pandemic's earliest days reveals that fewer than half had underlying medical conditions, but more than half needed mechanical ventilation within a day of admission. Seven of the 18 died.

In a companion article, also published in advance online today, a multi-national team from Mexico and the United States document the age distribution of the first month of the H1N1 pandemic in Mexico, where the disease appears to have struck first, and confirm its unusual pattern of severe pneumonia among younger patients. Matching the pattern to those of earlier pandemics, the team speculates on the "biologic plausibility of partial protection" in older people exposed to mid-20th century strains of seasonal flu.

The case series of 18 patients, written by researchers from INER, the Mexican Secretariat of Health and BIRMEX, Mexico's state-owned vaccine-production laboratories, documents the severe illness of the first patients admitted with lab-confirmed H1N1 infection and x-ray–confirmed bilateral pneumonia during the pandemic's first wave.

The 18, of whom 7 died, are a subset of 98 patients hospitalized at the institute with pneumonia or influenza-like illness between March 24, the presumed onset date of the first known case, and April 24. Those 98 were a subset of 214 patients who came to the institute's emergency room with influenza-like illness or severe respiratory distress.



posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 02:43 PM
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Good summary of how it evolved here:

content.nejm.org...




Conclusions

The emergence of influenza A (H1N1) 91 years ago led to a disastrous global pandemic. That virus is thought to have emerged almost simultaneously from birds into humans and swine. In contrast, S-OIV probably emerged from swine into humans. Although the immediate genetic event that led to the emergence of the new pandemic threat was a reassortment between two influenza A (H1N1) swine viruses, these two viruses were actually the products of at least four independent avian-to-mammalian cross-species transmissions, with at least four previous reassortments of gene segments among avian, human, and swine-adapted viruses (Figure 2). One consequence of this intertwined history is that S-OIV shares three gene segments with current seasonal human influenza A (H1N1) virus and three segments with human seasonal influenza A (H3N2) virus. It is not known whether low levels of cross-immunity against historically remote shared epitopes might confer some clinical protection against the newly emerging virus.


View larger version (45K):
[in this window]
[in a new window]

Figure 2. History of Human and Swine Influenza Lineages.

The diagram shows the full genetic history of the swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV). Each of the seven charts represents the genetic composition of a particular influenza virus lineage over time. In each chart, gene segments are shown along the left side, and dates from 1918 to 2009 are shown along the top. Color coding shows the avian origins and history of each gene segment in each influenza virus lineage. The influenza virus gene segment reassortments that gave rise to the H2N2 and H3N2 strains of human influenza A are shown on the left side of the diagram, along with human influenza A (H1N1) viruses or their descendants. Swine influenza A (H1N1) viruses are shown on the right side of the diagram.




The history of influenza A (H1N1) virus is punctuated by frequent, sporadic cross-species transmissions from swine to humans. Although the sporadically transmitted swine viruses are sufficiently pathogenic in humans to cause clinically apparent disease, they are rarely transmitted among humans. Exposure and infection are necessary but not sufficient for a new epidemic virus to emerge; the virus must also adapt and transmit.12 The one prominent exception to the general rule that these swine viruses are not transmitted among humans was the outbreak at Fort Dix. This virus was never transmitted beyond the military installation, probably because the intrinsic transmissibility of the virus was simply too low. Yet the global response to this outbreak was forceful, especially given that the outbreak self-quenched. The decision to mass-vaccinate the U.S. population resulted in the unfortunately large cluster of Guillain–Barré cases. Perhaps an even more serious consequence was the accidental release of human-adapted influenza A (H1N1) virus from a research study, with subsequent resurrection and global spread of this previously extinct virus, leading to what could be regarded as a "self-fulfilling prophecy" epidemic. The 1998 triple reassortant influenza A (H1N1) swine virus has shown what appears to be a proclivity to jump the species barrier and cause swine-to-human infections.

The emergence of yet another serious global health threat from an animal source highlights the critical need for deeper understanding of zoonotic viruses, including in vivo studies of pathogenesis in animals, field epidemiologic studies, and surveillance in animal populations, along with the development of computational models. The presumptive origins of the S-OIV influenza epidemic outside the United States show the critical importance of international collaboration in efforts to predict and control future pandemic threats.


[edit on 30-6-2009 by apacheman]



posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by PrisonerOfSociety
reply to post by asala
 


Do you mean 'London town', that's a pretty big collective; can you be more specific as London is definitely one to watch.

Do you use the tube? Have you seen people wearing masks yet?

Schools break up for 6 weeks in 2 weeks, so it should be interesting if they try to keep them open until then.


Im 25 min drive form Central London, Its called herts.
Yep i use the Tube and not one person have i see wearing a mask, There would be no need to as they dont really work anyway, Its been pretty well publicised that all you can do is wash your hands and throw tissues away,

Research shows the masks have very little effect,

From our Town paper,




Health experts have said Watford has been classified as a swine flu “hot spot” to help stop the spread of the virus.

Pupils at more schools across south west Hertfordshire have this afternoon been sent home with letters informing parents of outbreaks of the bug in classrooms.

Watford, Three Rivers and Hertsmere have all now been classified as epicentres for the virus, joining areas across London, near Birmingham and in Luton as those most severely infected.

A statement from the West Hertfordshire PCT read: “The Department of Health and the Health Protection Agency (HPA) have identified several areas in the UK where there is now widespread community transmission of swine flu - these are sometimes referred to as 'hotspots'.

“These areas now include the Watford, Three Rivers and Hertsmere district council areas in West Hertfordshire.

“In the same way as has already been done in parts of the West Midlands and London, the HPA has issued updated guidance to GPs in West Hertfordshire on how to handle cases of swine flu.

“From now on, GPs in these 'hotspots' will be using clinical assessment to determine who needs to be treated.

“This means that people who have flu-like symptoms may be clinically diagnosed as having swine flu without needing laboratory confirmation in all cases. GPs will then assess whether treatment is appropriate.”



www.watfordobserver.co.uk...



posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 05:55 PM
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President Obama holds meeting with 1976 administration officials to discuss H1N1



President Obama met with top officials from former President Gerald Ford's administration on Tuesday to discuss the 1976 H1N1 flu outbreak, the White House said.

"Today I joined the Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Education Secretary Arne Duncan, Homeland Security Advisor John Brennan and other senior advisors to meet with a select group of individuals who could speak knowledgeably about the lessons learned from the 1976 influenza so that we can further prepare this nation for the possibility of a more severe outbreak of H1N1 flu," President Obama said in written statement.


news.bnonews.com...



posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 09:04 PM
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We've been sending kids to camp for years without incidents of illness-

www.wsmv.com...



posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by Destroyed
It's strange how the U.K has so many cases of Swine flu and then here in Ireland there's like only 20
We're right across the pond from England and yet nearly no swine flu


1951, 1956, 1918 flus all hit Canada, Ireland, and England around Liverpool particularly hard. I suggest that Canada, Ireland, and England all having populations that tend towards being older rather than younger, that there is a greater proportion of people who have a resistance to this flu from the previous pandemics.

More population who have surviving "cross reactive immunity."

Lots of old people from those pandemics.

Give you an example - Canada is about 40% of the population over 50. 17% is under 18. We are an "old" country.

Also meaning Canada, Ireland and England should probably be seen as potential red-herrings for what this virus might do.



posted on Jun, 30 2009 @ 10:46 PM
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Hello, I haven't posted on this thread in months. I don't know if anyone has discussed this yet. I remember Ecoparity talking about this very thing and now I have first hand knowledge.

Approx. 3 weeks ago my best friends daughter started complaing of generalized fatigue, dizziness, slight nausea and loss of apetite. Then she developed a low grade fever 99. Within 24 hours she had a cough. In 72 hours she had a temp. Of 102.5. She was taken to the doctor and diagnosed with the Swine flu. She is 13.

I was very surprised and disappointed because her girl and mine were going on tour in New York, in about 11 days, where they would be singing in many different venues. Her pediatrician reassured my friend that she would be fine by then and to treat the symptoms. As long as she was fever free she would be OK. No need for Tamiflu because the window had passed. She would not need hospitalization unless her symptoms got bad. Despite a couple of sleepless nights, she recovered in time for the tour. None of the other girls became ill.

For 6 days they endured an intense schedule. Most adults I know would not have been able to keep up.

Two days before she was due home, she called her mom to say that one of her breast was hurting, discolored and she thought she had a fever. Her mother told her to go to a chaperone and ask for ibuprofin, which she did. My friend called me immediately to relay this information. I am a nurse and she wanted my opinion. My thoughts were that she probably had a small fiborous cyst that was infected. The girls were due back the next day.

When I arrived at the airport the flight had landed on time and we were waiting to see the girls. It seemed to be taking forever. After a 20 minute delay my phone rang. It was my daughter saying that my friends daughter had fainted and they were getting a wheelchair. We knew they were exhausted so we were still not alarmed. Then we were notified that the paramedics had been called to check her out. She was cold,and clammy with fever. Her temp. Was now close to 103. And her BP and heart rate were sky high. They rushed her to the hospital and I followed.

What we learned was shocking. It is important to note this is a very healthy girl who rarely gets sick. She is a vegetarian and exercises reguarly.

The doctors examined her quickly and after an ultrasound discovered she had an abcess about the size of a half dollar in her breast tissue. It would need to be surgically removed. They could not drain it as you would a regular cyst because the content was solid. She was started on IV antibiotics immediately. She needed a pediatric plastic surgeon so they transfered her to another. Hosp. It was well after midnight when the surgeon saw her. That is when I received the call from my friend explaining the doctor had seen several of these cases recently following a Swine flu infection an the nature of the cyst was MRSA. I almost dropped the phone. This is a Methecyllin Resistant Staphylococcys Aureus infection. In lamens terms a bacterial staph infection that does not respond to first line antibiotics such as Penicillin, tetracycline, doxycycine etc .

Is there something in this mutated virus that spurns on a dormant bacteria that is already present in the body and harmless if it remains so but can become deadly if activated? More research is needed!

I do know that MRSA has been named as the culprit in some of the highly publicized deaths due to Swine flu.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 12:56 AM
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Lowering of the immune system leaves you more susceptible to any infection. A great number of people carry staph on their bodies, including MRSA. The lower of the immune system by the pig virus is the opportunity it needs to get bad.

And the person you are referring to mainly said to ignore the MRSA thing because it was a red herring.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 01:19 AM
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Originally posted by Aeons
Lowering of the immune system leaves you more susceptible to any infection. A great number of people carry staph on their bodies, including MRSA. The lower of the immune system by the pig virus is the opportunity it needs to get bad.

And the person you are referring to mainly said to ignore the MRSA thing because it was a red herring.


I apologize aeons it has been a few months since i posted. If he said MRSA was a red herring I completely disagree. Here is where there needs to be clarity. Yes we carry staph on our skin. However, unless you have spent a lot of time in a a hospital you would not typically get MRSA. MRSA is a nosocomial acquired bacteria meaning one you would pick up in a hospital. Most healthcare workers in facilities that care for large numbers of patients have had quite a bit of exposure to MRSA. The body compensates and produces antibodies. Most likely this group will never come down with MRSA.

I would be more willing to believe that yes you can develop this when your immune system is compromised, but 9x out of 10, you will see it in a open wound or somewhere in the respiratory tract. I am very hard pressed to believe that a MRSA infection can develop in a healthy 13 year old, who is rarely ill, has never been in a hospital not even to visit people and who has no open wounds. The abcess Im speaking of is deep in the tissue. a large mass that is completely closed. There is no break in the skin.

To hear a doctor say they are seeing more and more cases like this secondary to Swine raised a very big red flag. Like I said more research is needed. But Ive seen the area in this young girl, there has been rapid spread to the surrounding tissue. Twenty four hours after iv antibiotics and she is still running fever around 102.7 If this was a regular staph infection she would be responding better than this.

Will post the info. when I get it.

[edit on 1-7-2009 by paxnatus]



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 01:28 AM
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I am sorry but you are essentially incorrect as to the environment of MRSA.

There is a very common form of MRSA that is in the community. You probably can find it on the shopping cart handles at your grocer. "Community Acquired/Associated MRSA."

You don't have to get it in the hospital.

If you have mammary ducts, you can get absessed. Women who are nursing are way more likely to get "milk fever" but they aren't the only ones.

If she got nipples, and she's got mammary ducts, she can get an infection in the milk ducts.

This used to be common knowledge I believe. The fact that so few people breastfeed anymore has broken the chain of information from generations past, and they are having to relearn it - slowly.

Girls can get milk fever. The bacteria at fault is often staph and/or a severe yeast infection.

[edit on 2009/7/1 by Aeons]



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 01:45 AM
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Here are some articles on what I am talking about. The H1N1 MRSA co-morbidity

link: [www.buffalonews.com...]

link:[www.hc2d.co.uk...]

link:[www.dshs.state.tx.us...]

That's enough for now. Please pray for this young girl. As always thank you!

Love,
Pax



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 01:57 AM
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Originally posted by Aeons
I am sorry but you are essentially incorrect as to the environment of MRSA.

There is a very common form of MRSA that is in the community. You probably can find it on the shopping cart handles at your grocer. "Community Acquired/Associated MRSA."

You don't have to get it in the hospital.

If you have mammary ducts, you can get absessed. Women who are nursing are way more likely to get "milk fever" but they aren't the only ones.

If she got nipples, and she's got mammary ducts, she can get an infection in the milk ducts.

This used to be common knowledge I believe. The fact that so few people breastfeed anymore has broken the chain of information from generations past, and they are having to relearn it - slowly.

Girls can get milk fever. The bacteria at fault is often staph and/or a severe yeast infection.

[edit on 2009/7/1 by Aeons]


Please see the post below! to quote you from above you said MRSA is typically carried on our body. I said you were incorrect.

Yes while it is true the milk ducts can get infected. keep in mind she is 13 and it is not the nipple that is infected. It is deep in the tissue there is no involvement with the areola she has no discharge of any Kind. Im not going to waste my time trying to convince you that the child has a "hot" MRSA infection secondary to the H1N1. Ive been at the hospital 2 days with her and spent 15 years as an ICU trauma nurse. I think I understand the human body. I provided at least 3 links to show that they are seeing a co-morbidity of H1N1 and MRSA. Please provide some evidence that says this is not the case. All I have right now is your opinion. Im not trying to be rude, but I am speaking with the doctors on this child's case and your telling me the two are not related. Makes no sense to me.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 06:16 AM
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Two more deaths in San Diego County:

www.mercurynews.com...

That makes three out of 392 local cases, about a .77% mortality rate.

Just checked the news again, the number of cases has risen to 465 in one day, a 24-hour increase of 73 cases. That's a lot.



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 09:57 AM
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Argentina has declared a Flu Emergency, Emergency powers have been given to local officials, and financial help in coping and tackling the outbreak:




Buenos Aires has announced a health emergency three months after the country's first case of swine flu.

Argentina has had more than 1500 cases of the disease and at least 26 people have died.




BBC SOURCE



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 10:32 AM
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reply to post by Laurauk
 


45 dead in Argentina

2009 flu pandemic



posted on Jul, 1 2009 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by infinite
 



Thank you for the pudate, why must the BBC represent false figures!!!! Just shows the dis or misinformation that supposingly publicly owned company gives out time and time again.


[edit on 1-7-2009 by Laurauk]




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