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Increase in coloured "stars"?

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posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 11:22 AM
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Recently I have noticed an increase in coloured stars, mainly orange and red that I havent seen before. Also Ive noticed several "muli coloured" stars that switch from white, green, silver, red and white.

In the link below it states stars can indeed be many colours but does not mention they can be multi coloured.

Last night I saw 5 red "stars" all very bright and in the same area. I dont remember clusters of red stars such as this before. Maybe some one knows of a cluster of bright red stars I dont know. I know red stars such as Betelgeuse , Ive seen those for years but these seem to be new and in clusters.

There are several multi coloured ones I see, they do "move" (as the Earth orbits) and behave like stars but what if they arnt stars. What if they are acting like stars to avoid detection? What better way to avoid detection than just behave like a star.

Has anyone else noticed a sharp increase in coloured stars and multi coloured stars?




outreach.atnf.csiro.au...

[edit on 21-4-2009 by Mr Green]




posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 11:30 AM
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The "multi-colored" stars are showing the effects of scintillation, also call twinkling. They are not really changing color, disturbances in the atmosphere cause the appearance of color change. If you're noticing more of it, it's because of atmospheric conditions.
www.ufowisconsin.com...



[edit on 4/21/2009 by Phage]



posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 11:43 AM
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I have noticed that stars can seem to change color as I move my eye because a greater amount of light falls on a cone that detects a particular color than another color.



posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 11:43 AM
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Hey thanks for that. From your link below.....


This is because of scintillation ("Twinkling") as the light passes through the atmosphere of the Earth. As the air moves in and out, the starlight is refracted, often different colors in different directions. Because of this "chromatic abberation," stars can appear to change colors when they are twinkling strongly.


Seems a very good scientific explanation to me
Is it possibly pollution thats causing the atmospheric conditions maybe?

Why do some change colour then while say a cluster of red to the left are just red?

Oh well you mean its not a Giant Mothership
shame this would have been so much more exciting.

thanks for what is a very good explanation.




posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 11:52 AM
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Why is it then when I zoom in on these stars with my camera, I can pull in the full amount of light meaning max the picture from side to side filled with the "star", yet I see no gases, no plasma, nothing like that rather something that looks like a pearl that is solid, not translucent, and appears to be spinning around an axis...I'll try to post some of this footage in a few minutes?

Phage?

Ok, Phage beat me to it, only my footage zooms in way closer. I'll still post it, but I need a few.

[edit on 21-4-2009 by letthereaderunderstand]



posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by letthereaderunderstand
 

Two things; auto-focus doesn't work when you are trying to photograph a point of light, digital zoom creates its own set of problems. Don't use either if you want to take a picture of a point of light.

(click to open player in new window)



posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 12:28 PM
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I'm interested in seeing these red stars... I have never noticed a cluster of red stars.... only the orangey glow of Mars.

Any chance you could post a picture of these or give me some directions to see them? Maybe I am uber stupid and missing something here but I'm sure we've never had red stars that can be seen with the naked eye.

Edit: Sorry, I just re read your post, it seems you are as perplexed as me.

[edit on 21-4-2009 by and14263]



posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 12:31 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


A very interesting and very informative demonstration.

I have heard that while digital cameras are easy to use for people like me that have no real photography skills, that they also can cause distortions in the images, especially with regard to light.

I have taken some pictures usually around dusk that have presented with some really strange images. I have been told that these images are only distortions of light.

After seeing your demonstration I can see that the are probably right.

Thanks.



posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks Phage. I actually give one of those pointers in my "Orbs" video. My only other suggestion for those who care is use a tripod. Don't try to film with your hand. If you don't have a tripod then try to set on a solid surface and use a remote to control zoom and aperture.

I appreciate the advice. Auto focus is a nightmare when trying to film anything at a distance but especially a point of light.

peace



posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 01:28 PM
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Let's just take the fact that you are seeing more multicolored stars that usual - or as someone explained it being atmospheric changes that make the stars appears multicolored. So - more atmospheric change -
What are these changes - are why are they more noticeable?
Why are we seeing more multicolored clouds during the day?
Why so many more colored sun dogs?
The atmosphere is changing. And not just a little.
But enough that we are -finally- noticing.


[edit on 21-4-2009 by spinkyboo]



posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Ok. This example you've provided is perfect for my question.

You zoom in to where Venus is completely filling the frame. Other then the light intensity setting, why isn't the surface visible. It is zoomed in no different then a telescope, so why can't the surface be seen?

Then again, I have filmed the moon where the light completely washes out the features. If you had turned down the light intensity, would you then be able to view the surface or at least make out some detail? This is what confuses me.

Or a star. Say it is a random star you point at. You have the cam set correctly (auto focus off, tripod, no digital zoom) and then zoom in on a star. A star is usually the center of a solar system correct? Why is nothing else visible, yet you can zoom in that close?

Thanks again



posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 02:22 PM
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Originally posted by and14263
I'm interested in seeing these red stars... I have never noticed a cluster of red stars.... only the orangey glow of Mars.

Any chance you could post a picture of these or give me some directions to see them? Maybe I am uber stupid and missing something here but I'm sure we've never had red stars that can be seen with the naked eye.

Edit: Sorry, I just re read your post, it seems you are as perplexed as me.

[edit on 21-4-2009 by and14263]


hi

ive tryed before to film stars and orbs in the sky. We only have a small Nikon 7.1 MP digital camera and they never ever come out as how they appear in the sky. I filmed some orange orbs once (posted on ATS) and the camera does just not capture them as visually seen one bit.



posted on Apr, 23 2009 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by Mr Green
 

The nights are getting lighter round here so I don't get to look at the night sky on my drive home anymore, this is probably not safe but I'm driving for like 2 hours so it's a good opportunity to look.

I mentioned your thread to a friend and he kind of said the exact same thing as you, he even used the word 'cluster'!?! I'm on the look out...



posted on Apr, 23 2009 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by and14263
reply to post by Mr Green
 

The nights are getting lighter round here so I don't get to look at the night sky on my drive home anymore, this is probably not safe but I'm driving for like 2 hours so it's a good opportunity to look.

I mentioned your thread to a friend and he kind of said the exact same thing as you, he even used the word 'cluster'!?! I'm on the look out...


thanks. I looked last night and one of the stars that changes between many colours was there. What I cant understand is if it is atmospheric conditions that cause these white stars to appear as coloured, how come the same atmospheric condition ALWAYS surrounds the same stars
Youd think the colour change would be an entirely random thing as the atmospheric conditions/pollution alters/clears or changes?

Plus the famous stars that we all know as red stars, why doesnt the atmospheric condition sometimes make them appear white or green?

Theres another star that is in the sky every night at the same place exact time, its always orange, always. It appears to move as the night goes on just like a star but is always orange.

Dont go crashing your car looking for red clusters though will you!!!

[edit on 23-4-2009 by Mr Green]



posted on Apr, 23 2009 @ 11:18 PM
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reply to post by Mr Green
 


Perhaps you're seeing evidence of climate change as others have mentioned



posted on Apr, 25 2009 @ 04:50 AM
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Is this the first time you have actually noticed this?
I've noticed this for years, since I was a kid even.
Thought it was rather cool.



posted on Apr, 25 2009 @ 06:31 AM
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Originally posted by BLV12
Is this the first time you have actually noticed this?
I've noticed this for years, since I was a kid even.
Thought it was rather cool.


There have always been coloured stars that I too noticed as a kid, but they always seemed to be very rare and because of this stood out. Now when I look into the night sky there seems to be lots more and sometimes clustered together. I guess air polution may be the reason for this.



posted on Apr, 25 2009 @ 06:02 PM
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I agree, it seems to be increasing suddenly. And while my son filled me in on the atmosphere thingy the other night, I have to say, it does seem to be new to certain stars, and stay with them, rather than affect all of them, or random.
There is one in particular that I couldn't find out which one, bu was somewhat close to orion's belt, that was reddish, and then bluish, green flashes alot suddenly occurring on the stars over the evergreens or near them. I wonder what changes in atmosphere is doing this and why they affect certain locations more than others?



posted on Apr, 25 2009 @ 06:16 PM
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what gets me is how the climate change or atmosphere pollution stays the same around select stars? You think it would swirl around as the air moves and clears . Its definatly odd. You know this is going to sound odd too but this cluster of red stars I mentioned in the OP, its never the same two nights running, why is that? Surely if these are not stars wouldnt an astronomer have pointed this out? two nights running the cluster is different shapes but always red. Maybe the recent prediction about a Red Dwarf appearing on 24th April was taken too literally, maybe it is about a small red "star"? I really dont know, all I can say is what Ive observed.

[edit on 25-4-2009 by Mr Green]



posted on Apr, 26 2009 @ 03:59 PM
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I can't believe this, I saw a "small red star" the other night while drinking with my buddies.

It was slowly moving, so my friends said it was a satelite.

So what do you guys think it is?

[edit on 26-4-2009 by heyJude]



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