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60 minutes to do a story on cold fusion 4/19

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posted on Apr, 19 2009 @ 05:18 PM
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I know howmany on this board feel about the msm but 60 minutes is pretty good quality stuff for the most part. They are doing a story on cold fusion that I think shoudl prove ot be interesting.

I will post a link to the video online once it airs, (60 minutes is really good at posting the most recent episode right after it airs).

www.cbsnews.com...


We will see if they provide anything insightful or if it will all be rudimentary.

[edit on 19-4-2009 by Desolate Cancer]




posted on Apr, 19 2009 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by Desolate Cancer
 


I'll definitely be watching "60 Minutes" when it comes on here in less than an hour. Their stories haven't been bad lately so let's see if this pans out.



posted on Apr, 19 2009 @ 05:22 PM
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Oh very cool. Thank you for the heads up. I will have to watch and see how the segment goes! Do you know if they are going to be interviewing anyone about it? If so, who?



posted on Apr, 19 2009 @ 06:41 PM
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Well, the segment itself is over. I only managed to watch part of it after just now reading about it.

It's interesting how the scientific community at large had considered cold fusion crackpot science but now they have replicated the original guy's experiments and results.
At least we know that DARPA is putting more funding to the programs now with 2 places researching and not just the Navy labs.



posted on Apr, 19 2009 @ 06:44 PM
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I just saw the segment and thought it was very well-done!

The emotions of the scientists (esp. Fleischman) were palpable and although I haven't seen the data, the fact that a representative from the American Physical Society had the chance to scrutinize these experiments and supported the claim that anomalous heat (beyond the energy put into the experiment) was being produced was quite impressive!
Good stuff & thanks for letting us know this was going to be on.


[edit on 19-4-2009 by X-tal_Phusion]



posted on Apr, 19 2009 @ 06:44 PM
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Watch the whole segment here at CBS News:
www.cbsnews.com...


More Than Junk Science

When first presented in 1989 cold fusion was quickly dismissed as junk science. But, as Scott Pelley reports, there's renewed buzz among scientists that cold fusion could lead to monumental breakthroughs in energy production.

April 19, 2009 4:29 PM



posted on Apr, 19 2009 @ 07:37 PM
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Yea it was rather excellent I thought.

Its interesting that they still dont know exactly how it works. So the possibility remains that it is not cold fusion but maybe even something more esoteric like zero point or something else. Most likely cold fusion though.

What are your guys thoughts on the kind of process that is happening in the reaction?

If this pans out maybe it would be a good idea to buy up palladium futures and take hold of the metal, since its value would certainly increase.



posted on Apr, 19 2009 @ 08:08 PM
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reply to post by Desolate Cancer
 


They show was very interesting. One researcher says they believe it is the interaction of the D2O (Deuterium) with the palladium that causes the energy boost. They also claim that they used ordinary seawater in their expirements which contains much less D2O then heavy water(I could be wrong on this).

Heavy water (D2O)
Water containing significantly more than the natural proportions (one in 6,500) of heavy hydrogen (deuterium, D) atoms to ordinary hydrogen atoms. Heavy water is used as a moderator in some reactors because it slows down neutrons effectively and also has a low probability of absorption of neutrons.

Palladium would probably be a good choice for an investment. However, if cleaner energy technology takes hold in automobiles, there will be abundant supply because half of it produced is used in catalytic converters.
Wikipedia has a pretty good write up on Palladium. One thing i found interesting is that it contains varying isotopes with one having a half-life of 3.6 million years. Next longest is 19 days or so. The researcher in the show theorized that they would only need replacing every three or four years so it must be the long lasting isotope causing this reaction. Perhaps recharging would be as simple as adding a little seawater.

They also need a current to keep it going. I imagine if this works then part of the excess energy taken from the water could be used to power the current needed.

This isn't free energy per say but is simply unlocking energy that already exist in the water. I'll be watching this.



posted on Apr, 20 2009 @ 02:04 AM
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I'll go check this out right now. 60 minutes the one MSM outlet I have a good deal of respect for, because they cover more important stories than the rest of MSM. If I have anything really exciting to say after seeing it, I'll edit my post. It looks interesting.

Yeah, I'm not sure what to think on the subject of cold fusion. The independent scientist in that clip was really skeptical, but when he did his analysis, he couldn't find any mistakes or explain the excess heat in the experiment, only that it really was there. Cold fusion definitely looks promising, and I would not call it 'junk science', but I do think we need more research, and I'm glad there are people working on it, and honest scientists like that formerly skeptical guy who will admit that his mind was changed, since most people are too stubborn to change their minds with new evidence.

One problem I see is that the palladium those guys are using is really expensive. The technology might be made to work one day, but the economics will limit the situations it can be used it. It'll still definitely be worth it for homes, cars, industrial machines, stuff like that, but it sure won't end up in your cellphone or watch.

[edit on 20-4-2009 by DragonsDemesne]



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