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Tweet this: Rapid-fire media may confuse your moral compass

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posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 08:10 AM
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Tweet this: Rapid-fire media may confuse your moral compass


www.physorg.com

Emotions linked to our moral sense awaken slowly in the mind, according to a new study from a neuroscience group led by corresponding author Antonio Damasio, director of the Brain and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California.

The finding, contained in one of the first brain studies of inspirational emotions in a field dominated by a focus on fear and pain, suggests that digital media culture may be better suited to some mental processes than others.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 08:10 AM
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Perhaps this is more significant than many might appreciate on the surface (and that statement is doubly ironic considering the context).

Here we are, those of us who seek out information aggressively and are driven to exchange perceptions and comments on what we are exposed to on this digital medium..., yet have we stopped to consider what effect it can have on our own emotional responses?


"For some kinds of thought, especially moral decision-making about other people's social and psychological situations, we need to allow for adequate time and reflection," said first author Mary Helen Immordino-Yang.

Humans can sort information very quickly and can respond in fractions of seconds to signs of physical pain in others.

Admiration and compassion—two of the social emotions that define humanity—take much longer, Damasio's group found.


It begs reflection and digestion.


The study raises questions about the emotional cost—particularly for the developing brain—of heavy reliance on a rapid stream of news snippets obtained through television, online feeds or social networks such as Twitter.

"If things are happening too fast, you may not ever fully experience emotions about other people's psychological states and that would have implications for your morality," Immordino- Yang said.


For those interested in such trains of thought...


Their study will appear next week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Online Early Edition.


I hope our local 'Twitterers' take note.

www.physorg.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 08:25 AM
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There is already a thread about this here:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

It's disinfo.



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 08:56 AM
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reply to post by djzombie
 


I'm not sure what specifically about it is disinfo. But I accept that it's been discussed before.... sorry.

EDIT TO ADD:

Oddly, I read the thread you referenced above, and I feel that the mark was missed regarding the study.

CNN may have 'spun' this differently for a reason. They are after all MSM and they are part of a singular media network which spans paper periodicals, radio, and television; so I can understand their eagerness at casting disparaging attributes to the internet phenomenon.

But this study is about something much more fundamental than commerce or social-networking. It's about how people loose a dimension of the information they receive if they are not permitted to (or don't allow themsleves to) internalize it.

It's about the dissolution of empathy.

I think the thrust of the thread I intended was significantly different than the apparent knee-jerk response which CNN provoked (that, in and of itself might be a good topic to discuss).

MM

[edit on 15-4-2009 by Maxmars]



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 12:46 PM
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It's about the dissolution of empathy.


And all you have to do to debunk this study is look inside yourself.

I can tell you about only myself personally, and this is not happening to me.

I am not any less empathetic reading about an incident 5 seconds after it happened, than I am reading about it 2 days after it happened.

I read news stories every day, in rapid succession, I feel some kind of emotion about nearly every story I read.

This is disinformation, and its easy to see.




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