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Help needed to find river name origin/meaning: Ankham

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posted on Apr, 12 2009 @ 11:04 PM
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I've been looking into the history of my county and looking into the origin of place names ect. One I am really struggling is with my local river. It is currently known as the Ancholme but evolved from its former spelling of Ankam, as did Brigg a town that it runs through - that evolved from Bridge.
I'm not sure when the river was named Ankham, I do know that the area had been under Scandinavian Rule in the 9the Century, I think Norman after that i think?? I was wondering though if anyone knows where the word Ankham derives from and what it means, I cannot find much on the naming of the river so hope someone may be able to help. My gut feeling is Danish/Swedish origin but i really am just guessing.

here are a couple of extracts to from an old account which refers to the river as Ankam:



The site of old Winteringham was almost
enclosed with water, having only a slip of land
towards the Roman road, as an entrance. It
is, therefore, well described, as "a peninsula
between the Humber and Ankham." On the
east side, there was a spring of fresh water,
which was considered a great rarity, arising
so near an arm of the sea. About one hun-
dred and twenty years ago, there was some
stone work remaining round this spring, and
also an iron ladle, for the convenience of tra-
vellers. The older inhabitants of Wintering-
ham still dwell with a mixture of wonder and
pleasure on these by-gone days, concerning
which they have heard their forefathers speak,
as remembering the time when very con-
siderable foundations were exposed in the
necessary works of their agricultural pursuits.
At the period to which this refers, the old town
may be said to have been literally ploughed
up; for many Roman antiquities were there
found, amongst which are particularly men-
tioned pavements and chimney stones, some
so large, and so near the surface of the soil,
as to injure their ploughshares. In several
other places were discovered evident traces of
streets, made of sea-sand and gravel. It is,
indeed, expressly mentioned by an old author,
that at the termination of Hermen Street, a
small Roman road branched off directly west-
ward, passing over Whitton-brook, to the
Aquis of the ancients, which place is now
called Alkborough.




www.winteringham.info...

www.archive.org...



From Grimsby the shore draweth in with great reach to make way for to admit Humber, by Thornton a religious house in times past instituted for the worship of God by William the Grosse Earle of Aumarle; also by Barton, where there is a very notable Ferry or passage over into Yorkshire. Hard by, Aukham a little muddy river, and therefore full of Eeles, emptieth it selfe into Humber, neere unto the spring-head whereof is Merket-Rason, so called of a mercate there well resorted unto. Somewhat higher stand Angotby, now corruptly called Osgodby, belonging in times past to the family of Semarc, from whom it descended hereditarily to the Airmins; also Kelsay, a Lordship in old time of the Hansards, men of great name in this shire, from whom in right of the wives it came to the family of the Ascoghs, Knights. But after this, Ankham hath a bridge over it at Glanford, a small mercate towne which the common people of the said bridge so commonly call Brigg that the true name is almost quite forgotten. Next unto it within a Parke I saw Kettleby, the seat of the worshipfull ancient family of the Tirwhits, Knights, descended from Gronvil Oxenbridge, and Enchingham. But in times past it was the habitation, as a man may gather by the name, of one Ketell (which was in the times of the Saxons and Danes and usuall name). For bye in the English-Saxon language signifieth A dwelling place , and , and byan to dwell , whence it is that so many places both elsewhere in England here especially in this shire doe end in bye.


www.visionofbritain.org.uk...


also referred to in this 'old map' site under River Ankam (Ancholme)

www.oldmaps.co.uk...

I know we have some scandinavians on the site, so maybe i can find out if at least the word is of scandinvian origin or not?

i have been using the following site which has helped me with other place names in the area, but i am stuck on this one????
www.viking.no...







[edit on 12-4-2009 by MCoG1980]




posted on Apr, 13 2009 @ 01:42 AM
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Another refernce i found to Ankham and Ank is from a book of County Folklore (circia 1908?)



Thornton. Ferriby. At the north side is the fragments
of the chappel. . . . The drainers that drained these
levels of Ank, vulgo Ankham, fetch'd all the stone from
this chappel that they built Ferry Sluce with, in and, by
a just judgment of God upon (them), for applying that to
profane uses that had been given to God, the drainers
were all undon, and the sluce, which cost many thousands
of pounds building is now coming down.


www.archive.org...

I googled Vulgo Ankham and just Ank and still drew a blank, any help with this is greatly appreciated.



posted on Apr, 13 2009 @ 03:36 AM
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I think you need someone well versed in old norse or something in order to get to the bottom of the word. I may be scandinavian, but its not really a word that says anything to me. Ankham - Ankhamn (duck harbour)? That's just funny

Or maybe it has to do with ankomst, ankra (arrive, make port) which I suppose would make sense if it had to do with viking landings (assuming it is connected to the sea, I cant tell from your links). Regardless, that's thinking in modern terms.

Edit: Hey maybe I'm smarter than I thought. I read the texts a little more, and Ankham is actually meantioned in relation to an area filled with birds. Lol, well its a wild guess.

[edit on 13-4-2009 by merka]



posted on Apr, 13 2009 @ 04:45 AM
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I've only heard it used as an unusual Family name, or with reference to the ankham flower, which remains significant as a symbol in Egyptology, associated with death and rebirth, the underworld, and the goddess Isis.


Tut ankham un.


Also, I have speculated that the author H.P.Lovecraft, derived the name of a town and a university that often appears in his stories - Arkham - from this word.



posted on Apr, 13 2009 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by merka
 


Duck Harbour? I like that
- area full of birds, that i would think make sense, lincolnshire is still full of wildlife and as it coastland and countryside you get a mix of birds - although i'm not sure what it would have been like back in the viking days though. Thanks for your info, sounds very logical and plausable.



I think i have found the text you are referring to:


But after this, Ankham hath a bridge over it at Glanford, a small mercate towne which the common people of the said bridge so commonly call Brigg that the true name is almost quite forgotten. Next unto it within a Parke I saw Kettleby, the seat of the worshipfull ancient family of the Tirwhits, Knights, descended from Gronvil Oxenbridge, and Enchingham. But in times past it was the habitation, as a man may gather by the name, of one Ketell (which was in the times of the Saxons and Danes and usuall name). For bye in the English-Saxon language signifieth A dwelling place, and , and byan to dwell, whence it is that so many places both elsewhere in England heere especially in this shire doe end in bye.
All this Tract over at certain seasons, good God, what store of foules (to say nothing of fishes) is heere to be found! I meane not those vulgar birds which in other places are highly esteemed and beare a great price, as Teales, Quales, Woodcocks, Phesants, Partridges &c., but such as we have no Latin names for, the very delicate dainties, indeed, of service, meates for the Demigods, and greatly sought for by those that love the tooth so well. I meane Puitts, Godwitts, Knots, that is to say, Canuts or Knouts birds (for out of Denmarke they are thought to fly thither), Dotterells, so named of their dotish foolishnesse, which being a kind of birds, as it were, of an apish kind, ready to imitate what they see done, are caught by candle light according to foulers gesture: if he put forth an arme, they also stretch out a wing; sets he forward his legge, or holdeth up his head, they likewise doe theirs; in briefe, what ever the fouler doth, the same also doth this foolish bird untill it be hidden within the net. But these things i leave to their observation, who either take pleasure earnestly to hunt after Natures workes, or, being borne for to pamper the belly, delight to send their estates downe the throat.


www.philological.bham.ac.uk...

here is a link of the location of the river, its a tributary of the River Humber (Estuary).
www.water-ways.net...


I found a site claiming to that the real meaning is as follows, although i don't know how they come to this conclusion when its was originally spelt Ankham. However, it is true there were many monastries/abbey's in the area




The Cider Centre is a popular stopping off point for cyclists. Brandy Wharf is steeped in legends and history, folk have linked the settlement on the side of the River Ancholme with smuggling, but it’s name is derived from a religious sect of Viking settlers named Brande. They became stranded after their invasion in 867AD so set up a ferry service across the tidal River Ancholme. The west bank pick - up point became known as Brande’s Wharf, it has been altered through time to the present day name of Brandy Wharf.
The word Ancholme explains that the area was home of the Anchorites, religious recluses, hermits and the like. At one time there were many monasteries along the length of the river.


community.lincolnshire.gov.uk...



[edit on 13-4-2009 by MCoG1980]



posted on Apr, 13 2009 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by undermind
 


Thanks for your input, i also found the same when i googled Ankham. Due to the Viking History of the area, i am still inclined to lean towards the name originating from Norse/Dane or even Anglo Saxon.
Thankyou for your info though, it all helps.




posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 04:37 AM
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reply to post by MCoG1980
 

Ankham. 'Ham' is a suffix attached to place names and meaning either settlement or small farm. Ferneham would mean 'farm by the ferns', but I'm sure you already know this. My thinking here is that we'd need to isolate the usage of Ank or variation 'Anc'. In Lincolnshire there's Ancaster located near a Roman road and town. It's possible that Anc/Ank has a Roman value and predates Norse settlers...


The site of old Winteringham was almost enclosed with water, having only a slip of land towards the Roman road, as an entrance. It is, therefore, well described, as "a peninsula [86] between the Humber and Ankham." On the east side, there was a spring of fresh water, which was considered a great rarity, arising so near an arm of the sea.
Link

I've had a brief look for variations of Anc/Ank in Celtic, Norse, Roman etc and found nothing...

I've had an idea that you might find interesting
Other than Ancaster and Ankham sharing Roman features...they share an association with eels. Maybe Ank/Anc is a regional dialect term for eel? Good luck hunting



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 05:40 AM
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The ordnance survey site has a link to the English Place Name Society, and also an e-mail contact for specific place name queries. Could maybe try them, if the e-mail is still current.

ordnance survey



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by MCoG1980
 


the word "ank" could be a derivative of the word "anker" translated "anchor", and the word "ham" could be "hamn"="harbor" or "plass/sted"="place" so the whole meaning would be "ankerplass" "a place where they anchored they're ships. not sure how i would translate that to english.


noone from iceland here? icelandic is the language closest to old norse in the world. they talk almost the same now as we did then. (i am from norway.)



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 09:57 AM
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The River Ancholme is a river in North Lincolnshire, England, and a tributary of the Humber estuary. It rises south of Bishopbridge (west of Market Rasen), and passes through many Lincolnshire Villages, notably the market town of Brigg and flows north into the Humber at South Ferriby. In its natural post-glacial state, the river's valley was flat-bottomed, for it had formed the bed of glacial Lake Ancholme, on an outwash delta as the ice retreated,[1] and consequently fenny. The river still has a distinctly rural character, and the landscape is agricultural.

Any luck looking into the glacial lake or the history of who was there when it formed they would of been the ones to name it giving you the correct language to follow for the meanings behind the name.



posted on Apr, 16 2009 @ 06:29 PM
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Thanks to everyone above for there help on this, i am looking into everything everyone has mentioned a little further and looking for connections to other place names and historic features in its vacinity.
Will post any findings, thanks again.



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by darkspace
 


I am finding older references spelt mostley without the h - Ankam.
I am finding a few languages that have the word Ankam, but only a few could make sense, but still i cannot find reference to that culture in the area, at the moment, i would say the birds or anchor deriative theory hold out the most:

German: Arrive/d
Malayalam: duel/fighting
greek: Angle/bend/bow - the river was one but spilt in to 2 in the 17th century i think, and is still as new and old river ancholme. I am told the older, natural river does bend so who knows, name then possibly could stand up from roman times,?

Now i am confused though, this is an extract from a publication - WILLIAM SMITH'S DESCRIPTION OF ENGLAND, year: 1588. Here the author uses both versions of spellings Ankam and also Ankolm, and i'm not sure if he is referring to same river or not??? Whatever though, the reference to Glanford Bridge (Brigg as its now known) says Ankam which today is definately spelt Ancholme.


Lincolne is one of tlie greatest citties in England, and standeth in the prouince
of Lindse)', vppon tlie river Witham, which springcth w/thin a myle of Rutland, at
South With^rm, & so passeth to North W'ith^m, Granthain, Beckingham, & Lincolne,
and here it dcvydeth Lindsey from Kesteuen, ffrom whence there [is] a dych digged Lindsey.
to tlie Trent, called Fosdich, about 8 myles long ; ffrom Lincoln it kepeth his course
estvvards to Tatershall, where it receaveth in a river named Bane, and then passeth
throwgh the Fennes to Boston ; and about 4 myles thence falleth into tlie sea.

*Ganesboro%o standeth vppon the river of Trent, which in that place parteth *[ieaf9i.]
Lincolnshire from Nottinghamshyre, about 12 mylcs northwest from Lincolne.

Markct-Rasin standeth in the middest of Lindsey, about 14 myles est from
Ganesborow, 10 northest from Lincolne, and vppon tite head of tlie river of Ankolm,
or Ankam
, which roning from thence to Newsted, Glandford-Bridge, & Horstow,
falleth into the Humber.

Castor is 6 myles north from Market Rasin.

Kirton, in Lindsey, is 8 myles west from Castor, and as many northest from
Ganesborow.

Glandford-Bridge standeth vppon tlie Ankam, 6 myles northest from Kirton, &
as man]' northwest from Castor.

Burton standeth vppon tlie Trent, 7 myles northwest from Glandford Bridge, &
w/thin 3 myles of the Humber. Over against Burton is the Isle of Axholme, which
is 10 myles ' & 5 brode, and belongeth all to Lincolneshyre.

Liinberg (comonly called Great Liniberg, for diffrence of Litle Liinberg hard by),
is 8 myles south southest from Barton, & 6 est from Glandford Bridge.

Barton standeth vppon tlie Humber, almost right against Hull, 8 myles northest
from ]?arton, & 2 est from the mouth of the Ankolm.




source:www.archive.org...

variation of spellings in a general index - not sure date of publication:

sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu...





[edit on 17-4-2009 by MCoG1980]



posted on Apr, 23 2009 @ 06:05 PM
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In Dutch "Ank" would be a blacksmith tool and "ham" refers to land near water/sea, and since anglo-saxon derived from the saxon wich is still spoken in the north and east of holland, maybe there is a link there.


Low Saxon, also called Low German and in Low Saxon itself Plattdüütsch or Nedersaksisch is the language of northern parts of Germany, the Netherlands and many other regions in the world, where people from aforementioned regions settled. Those places include the US, Canada, Russia, Mexico, Brazil and some other countries in Southern America and elsewhere. Low Saxon has a rich history as a written language, going back till the 8th century. But even before it was spoken and was the base for the Anglo-Saxon language, which evolved into today's English language.


Wikipedia

[edit on 23/4/2009 by d0p3d]

[edit on 23/4/2009 by d0p3d]

[edit on 23/4/2009 by d0p3d]



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