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RIAA gives thumbs up to France's three-strike law

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posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 03:19 AM
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RIAA gives thumbs up to France's three-strike law


news.cnet.com

France has passed a law that requires Internet service providers to cut off Web access of customers accused of illegally downloading copyright material multiple times.

Mitch Bainwol, the RIAA's chairman and CEO, has never called for government regulation in this country, but said that France's decision to implement a three-strikes law is a sign the relationship between ISPs and copyright owners across the globe is only getting stronger.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.google.com




posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 03:19 AM
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Let me first say... Mitch, you and the RIAA are idiots.
Congratulations on upholding your longstanding tradition.

SonyBMG, TimeWarner, Viacom, Universal, EMI and other entertainment media companies have been making record profits all the while we have been told piracy has been on the "increase."
arstechnica.com...
www.zeropaid.com...

The MPAA is enjoying a 17.5% increase in box office ticket sales.
Domestic Box Office films in the US grossed $9.78 billion last year.
Newer movies continue to break the older "highest-grossing film" of all time records.

They're crying wolf and exaggerating the threat of piracy to movie & music industry to exact a monopoly on where and how citizens can obtain entertainment media like movies, music and so on just so they can have unbridled rights to even greater profit making schemes.

Unfortunately, it is starting to buy them a lot of undue sympathy from politicians.
Obama for one: news.cnet.com...

The cost of labour, time, resources and raw materials to produce an individual music album published by an artist is in the ten's of dollars. Not the hundred's of thousands.

Even the RIAA agrees with that assertion:

According to the report, the RIAA and digital media companies (DiMA) believe the 9 cents they currently pay for each physical copy sold or digital media file that's downloaded is much too high. And as the music industry loses revenue, the RIAA and DiMA believe the artists should "accept less money in order to keep the whole industry alive."

news.cnet.com...

9 Cents? Oh your poor things...

These medieval punishments for copyright infringement are nothing more than frustrated, big-name corporations exacting undue revenge on anyone they can manage to find downloading pirated media, instead of going after the real sources of piracy:

The South-East Asian counterfeiting rings.

Who output more pirated films, albums, software and fashion products a day than BitTorrent sites like PirateBay do in a year.


news.cnet.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 05:31 AM
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thats pretty

the Recording Industry Assciation of America - the same group that got its ass handed to it in every country outside of the USA is applauding another country

the same group that goes after pre teen girls and 90 year old grannies because of isp mistakes , the same group that has ski-mask clad body armour wearing `enforcement` officers.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 06:16 AM
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reply to post by Harlequin
 



the same group that goes after pre teen girls and 90 year old grannies because of isp mistakes


Well come on, if it's a choice between a terrorist with an MP5 and a 14-year old with an MP3, I think it's blatantly obvious who presents a greater danger to America.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 06:27 AM
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The key word in my opinion is 'accused'. Not proven guilty or sentenced. That there opens up a whole can of worms



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 06:47 AM
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The RIAA is putting lipstick on a French pig. They're happy they got anything from the French gov't to limit p2p downloads--the French law is very lenient and you have to be quite a persistent abuser to arrive at losing internet access. Quite the opposite of the gestapo tactics they take in the US.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 07:15 AM
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And as the music industry loses revenue, the RIAA and DiMA believe the artists should "accept less money in order to keep the whole industry alive."


Damn right the 'music industry' (read record label giants) loses revenue, they continuously pander junk to the masses and spent so much on PR and advertising to keep private record labels and artists at bay for fear of them breaking their monopoly.

I know this all too well as it was my industry.


[edit on 9-4-2009 by Goathief]



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 07:26 AM
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reply to post by Goathief
 



they continuously pander junk to the masses


Pandering junk alone isn't the issue...

It's the fact that the piece of junk in question, a printed CD that costs 10c to manufacture and press, containing 10-15 songs on it these days, each of which cost maybe a combined total of $5-9 dollars in labour, technical costs, time and skillsets per unit sold is actually being sold for 20-30 dollars to the consumer.

As long people have to pay 50-70 dollars for a new video game whose production cost per unit sold is maybe $20 dollars, $20-30 dollars for a new album whose production is maybe $5 dollars per unit sold or $10-20 dollars to see a new film who's production cost is maybe $15 dollars per unit sold....

They will turn to illegal means to obtain them instead. People did it during the Prohibition and they're doing it now.

You treat the consumers like enslaved cattle who will graze where you tell them to graze and they're going to be giving you a lot of sour milk.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 07:27 AM
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Hmm. Hate to tell you folks but how many times does it have to be said: downloading or selling unlicensed music is stealing? And it is being done to the tune of millions of dollars?

You may complain about it but the music industry is in fact a for-profit industry and they are well within legal rights to take this action. If you feel otherwise I look forward to watching you offer to work for free since that apparently is what many people on this board expect musicians, producers and music company executives to do. What the hell is wrong with you people? And what is up with this attitude of entitlement many of you have regarding theft?

It's no wonder a lot of you are so preoccupied with "conspiracies" because you guys are the root of your own problems.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 07:37 AM
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What the hell? You guys did see that it clearly says 'accused'. Apparently in Fr you are guilty untill proven innocent.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 07:41 AM
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reply to post by secretagent woooman
 



It's no wonder a lot of you are so preoccupied with "conspiracies" because you guys are the root of your own problems.


Uh-oh busteeeeeeeed! Okay you got us, we're all thieving, no-good, P2P-downloading, joint-rolling lowlives...

Thanks for jumping to conclusions about the majority of the consumers out there (who don't pirate), you may have a bright future ahead of you at Sony BMG, who tend to agree with your stance.


Enquire with Howard Stringer


You may complain about it but the music industry is in fact a for-profit industry and they are well within legal rights to take this action.


It doesn't even cost 99 cents of electricity to record a single music track these days.

You have no idea how sorely you are being ripped off.

"Taking action" is one thing. And is all well and good as long as it's proportionate.

Demanding accused "pirateers" pay $150,000 for every single copyright infringement (that means every track downloaded, every film, etc.) is downright medieval.

And not justifiable by any stretch of the imagination. Read my previous quote from the RIAA, who value each physical media file or track at around 9 cents worth themselves.


What the hell is wrong with you people? And what is up with this attitude of entitlement many of you have regarding theft?


Yeah man. What's all this "rational thinking" I keep hearing about? Why can't you swallow every bloated lied the corporate media tells you without questioning?

If you like being treated like an ATM machine on legs, that's your business...

Let me boil it down for you as simply as can be put:

If businesses refuse to listen to consumer feedback about their products and issue substandard quality products continually for a prolonged period of time, people are going to refuse to pay for them outright and turn to other methods of acquiring said products or demand that they slash prices for their products.

That's the name of the game here.

Commodization and monopolization:

1. Allowing one or two super-giants to dominate the film, music, software, and entertainment industries.

2. Kicking out every single competitor through unfair trading practices or taking over them.

3. Colluding to fix prices as they see fit.

4. Lowering product quality because there's no one else on the market to offer anything better, while cutting down on production costs so much they generate even more profit.

5. Stifling innovation and technological advancement by refusing to spend any money on new research & development (because this cuts into their profit margins).

6. Forcing the consumer to accept whatever they offer, at whatever price they like, whereever they like, because the consumer has no other choice.

7. Preventing the government from regulating their monopolised industries through bribes, political espionage and outright lies.

Hate to break it to your naive soul, but Piracy is not as "clear-cut" and black & white as you seem to think it is.

Fact of the matter is; faceless, shameless, capitalist organizations bring this kind of backlash on themselves by treating consumers like a sugar cane field ripe for the picking.

[edit on 9/4/09 by The Godfather of Conspira]



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 08:30 AM
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Producing and selling a product is NOT theft, regardless of how much they charge. Using the product without paying for it is and it is a crime. Yes, I do pay for mine!

If you really want to show the record companies how you feel, do not use their product, visit their sponsored websites, click on their banners, attend concerts or buy licensed band logo products. I can assure you that after a few weeks, maybe a month of a few hundred millions of people following suit with no profit margin, that they will rectify the system. Over the past few years you already are seeing a lot of CD prices drop, I browsed a record store last week and the average CD is down by about $4-5 dollars from what they were last fall. This was a corporate chain, not a mom and pop store. As it is some sites download for 15-75 cents per song and that is NOT a lot of money. Especially since the average album has at most two or three decent songs anway. You also have graphic artists, photographers, promo teams and other people behind the scenes who also have to be paid.

It is very offensive to ask these people to effectively work for free, most musicians do NOT make a lot of money and most wind up in serious debt after losing a recording contract because the money was fronted in advance by a record company and they have to pay it back through sales and tour profits. Ever been $400,000 or more in personal debt with no job and a mortgage? Lots of has-beens are and having met a few over the years I can tell you it is no paradise. Merchandise is the second highest profit line behind tour reciepts and so much of that is bootlegged now that it is almost impossible to make money off of it. I've watched the price of the average tour T-shirt for a major label band go from the $25-35 range in the past few years to the $50 range and above...and not always professional quality work so it is pretty safe to assume that the companies may be selling merchandise seized from bootleggers, not always a lot of trademark logos going on. A lot of the smaller bands are not selling much cheaper and some of them actually work their own booths at the show now so that is not a good sign either. It used to be that a friend or a roadie did that.

Either way, stealing is stealing. Somehow I don't see the analogy holding up in court that you stole gasoline from Handimart because Shell charges too much, there is no difference here other than the product. What I am really concerned about is this growing attitude among the population that "I am the center of the universe and can have what I want without working or paying for it," and not just in relation to music. It is a good thing that most of the so-called conspiracy scenarios don't pan out because so many people won't have the skills to cope!



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 09:06 AM
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It doesn't even cost 99 cents of electricity to record a single music track these days.

You have no idea how sorely you are being ripped off.


That may be true for the giants but for the independents it's far more costly. For example, I (as an artist) write two tracks which total 48 hours studio time (composing, recording, mastering, etc.) using my own expensive equipment with money out of my own pocket. How much should I be paid for my work? Lets assume the minimum wage is £6 to keep things simple, should I get £288 for it? If I can continue that for a year my salary would be just under £14,000 PA. Wheyhey!

Now, to see any of that money I have to take them to somewhere where vinyl can be cut as the equipment itself costs more than two years of my wages, let alone the training to use it properly. The cheapest option to get them out there are white label pressings which the average cost is about £600 for 300 12" vinyl singles that don't include a sleeve, design or artwork. For the sake of simplicity I won't get into test pressings and the like which really need to be done and will put up the cost even further.

How much do I need to sell them for?

At least £2 per vinyl to cover physical production costs.
Roughly £1 to cover my minimum wage.
Another £1 for my temporary licence to physically sell the singles myself.
Another £1 for other smaller expenses.

So lets say £5.

Now I need to shift these in one week alongside writing and producing the following week's to make the £14,000 PA (not including taxes yet) - basically it's not viable at all. So what are my other options? I could sell each track online from my website - say £1 a download without DRM... but wait, some little oik has paid for it then uploaded them to a file sharing site illegally and now everyone is getting it from there instead of giving me the money I've earned. I could try to sign to a big label but they look to exploit artists to as much as they can and I'll more than likely end up in debt or needing to work a second job to pay the bills and feed my family - not that I'll see much of them as I'm busy working all the time.

What to do? Take up a career in IT instead...



[edit on 9-4-2009 by Goathief]



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 09:30 AM
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Looks like the french assembly rejected it.

Fench Assembly Rejects RIAA bill.

Can't say I have any sympathy for them sooner they go out of business the better.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by secretagent woooman
 



Either way, stealing is stealing.


Whooooooooooooooooosh. That's the sound of my point flying over your head at lightspeed because you didn't even read my post.

1. I never admitted that it isn't stealing. Show me where I said that if you're so inclined to make baseless accusations.

2. "Taking action" is one thing. And is all well and good as long as it's proportionate.

Demanding accused "pirateers" pay $150,000 for every single copyright infringement (that means every track downloaded, every film, etc.) is downright medieval.


3. Just as Prohibition exhibited, make popular goods so prohibitively expensive or hard to obtain and people will always resort to illegal methods.

4. Piracy does not, and probably will not constitute a threat to the Entertainment Industry for some time to come.

As I said, if you bothered to read my post, half of the heart-string pulling diatribe about poor faceless corporations losing out on even more billions of dollars you wouldn't have needed to expend energy typing.

Let's not debate this ad nauseum and force people to constantly re-type their opinion because you don't bother reading it in the first place.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by Teknikal
 


I was just going to post direct contradictory reporting on this situation:

news.bbc.co.uk...

They REJECTED the legislation!!!



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 05:21 PM
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Well I was DL a movie one time, and they caught me, and they told me that the next time that they caught me they would turn off my cable and internet access. They made me turn off my uploading features before re-instating my internet. So I am not suprised by this at all. This is in the US btw.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 05:47 PM
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reply to post by mirageofdeceit
 


Yeah and...?

You think they're going to give up with enforcing the Draconian punishments for piracy infringement? Maybe a have a cry?

It's still relevant because the the RIAA and MPAA are just dying for stuff like this to proposed in the US.

So it was rejected in France, irrelevant because the EU are proposing wide-ranging legislation across all member states to force ISPs into giving up consumer names to law enforcement agencies.

It's not like the fight is suddenly over people.

[edit on 9/4/09 by The Godfather of Conspira]



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 07:34 PM
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I can't wait this law project gets to the senate and arrive on top of the pile of the big brother's new laws and miserably fail !

Three strikes my ass i heard they send you emails and *boom you're trapped , can't justify yourself, prove & disprove nothing, what kind of "demos cratos" is that ?

It's a good thing it's got delayed, more time for debate and dismantle their twisted logic bit by bit and greed intentions.

The People 1, Big Mighty Bother 0
Ball to the center & get ready for a sweep !



posted on Apr, 10 2009 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by The Godfather of Conspira
 


Too late - already here. It's called RIPA Act 2000.



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