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Scientists Say Aliens and Humans May Have Similar DNA Patterns

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posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 01:52 AM
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First let me present the article:


The world has been fascinated with the existence of little green (or gray) men ever since the idea of extraterrestrial life first caught the eyes and ears of the public. Fed by more or less real events, such as UFO sightings, abductions, and inexplicable phenomena such as crop circles, people's fantasies of aliens have grown over the years, and more so after Hollywood started depicting them in movies. Now, a group of researchers comes to argue that humans and possible aliens may share the same genetic architecture, on account of the fact that the building blocks of life are the same in all of the Universe.

According to researchers at the McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, led by astrophysicist Ralph Pudritz, this idea was prompted by the fact that the way in which amino-acids were found to bond in meteorite samples that were collected from Earth seemed very similar to the way the building blocks of proteins tied to each other inside all living organisms on our planet. “This may implicate a universal structure of the first genetic codes anywhere,” Pudritz says, as quoted by Wired.

“Thermodynamics is fundamental. It must hold through all points of the universe. If you can show there are certain frequencies that fall in a natural way like this, there is an implied universality. It has to be tested, but it seems to make a lot of sense,” he adds. Paul Higgs, also a biophysicist at the McMaster University, has co-authored the new study detailing the hypothesis, which has been published online on April 6th in arXiv.

The experts say that the amino-acids required for the formation of proteins are relatively simple in structure, and that a warmer meteorite would excel in providing the building blocks of life an appropriate environment to grow and to bind in ways that may facilitate the appearance of basic life forms. And this part of the hypothesis refers to celestial bodies moving around in Cosmos, but similar conditions could be met on a distant exoplanet, where millions of years of shifting conditions could meet the necessary requirements for alien life to occur at one point.

If it does, because it is based on the same type of construction as we are, the new organisms could also develop the same DNA patterns. It's doubtful that the entire genetic structure will resemble that found on Earth, but it may be possible that hypothetical researchers could find common ground between the two types of lifeforms. softpedia

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


And may I also suggest this related article for you review:

Humans and Aliens Might Share DNA Roots

Excerpt:


That's the tantalizing implication of a pattern found in the formation of amino acids in meteorites, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, and simulations of primordial Earth. The pattern appears to follow basic thermodynamic laws, applicable throughout the known universe..

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


My rudimentary understanding of what they are suggesting is that "life" as we understand it can only manifest itself genetically through a single process. Thus if any alien life were to exist it would have to have emerged the same way life did on earth.

Please correct me on this point if I am misreading it as I am admittedly scientifically challenged.


Of course they are not talking about "intelligent" life, though I do find the use of the term "Alien" rather interesting.

It is not often that one sees in scientific circles the use of the word "alien" without going through an inordinate quantity of qualifiers to make sure they are clear that they don't mean "little green men."

Anywhoos, just thought I would share these articles with you.




posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 02:44 AM
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An interesting read. You may find this article intriguing as well. It's abit lengthy, but worth reading in my opinion.

Scientists find Extraterrestrial genes in Human DNA here





[edit on 9-4-2009 by phrankie79]



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 06:56 AM
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reply to post by phrankie79
 


Very nice article, thank you for sharing it.

I especially enjoyed this part:


Professor Chang and his research colleagues show that apparent "extraterrestrial programming" gaps in DNA sequencing precipitated by a hypothesized rush to create human life on Earth presented humankind with illogical growth of mass of cells we know as cancer."

Professor Chang further indicates that "What we see in our DNA is a program consisting of two versions, a big code and basic code." Mr. Chang then affirms that the "First fact is, the complete 'program' was positively not written on Earth; that is now a verified fact. The second fact is, that genes by themselves are not enough to explain evolution; there must be something more in 'the game'."

"Soon or later", Professor Chang says "we have to come to grips with the unbelievable notion that every life on Earth carries genetic code for his extraterrestrial cousin and that evolution is not what we think it is." *

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 01:14 PM
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Just one more thing as I try to wrap my head around this.


Internal conditions of meteorites are unknown, but some scientists believe that certain large meteorites are both warm and hydrated, making them roughly analogous to the relatively temperate environment of Earth's youth.

"There's a theory," said Pudritz, "that they could be made in the warm interiors of large-enough meteorites."

This is necessarily speculative, but it would explain why the 10 amino acids most common in primordial Earth experiments are also the most common acids found in meteorites.

Pudritz and Higgs speculate that these 10 common amino acids met the needs of the earliest replicating molecules, with other, rarer acids used by the nascent genetic code as they formed or arrived — a process called "stepwise evolution," culminating in the genes that gathered 3.6 billion years ago in a common ancestor of all complex life.

If simulations of interactions between these 10 acids indeed support molecules that can copy themselves, said Pudritz, then it's possible that they could support an ur-genetic code on Earth and elsewhere.

"There's a possible universality," he said, "for any code that would use amino acids." wired

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Does anyone know what "ur-genetic code" means?

Also more on this story and some interesting links at the New Scientist.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 02:12 PM
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Carl Segan already knew this. It is explained in Cosmos. Funny how scientists are going back to long known facts and calling it a discovery.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 02:53 PM
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Originally posted by schrodingers dog

My rudimentary understanding of what they are suggesting is that "life" as we understand it can only manifest itself genetically through a single process. Thus if any alien life were to exist it would have to have emerged the same way life did on earth.


Not exactly. What the theory (and it includes quite a lot of speculation) says, is that the basic building blocks of "our" genetic material could form spontaneously inside meteors rather than on a planetary surface. Some precursors of genetic material have been found in meteorites. This theory claims that more could be found and that they could actually be quite common.

The theory does not claim that there can only be one genetic process nor that alien life would necessarily based on amino acids. But, if the genetic material used by an alien life form did use amino acids, it is possible that that it would also use "our" amino acids because of the possibility that they are very common. The theory requires speculation about the formation of more complex acids (not yet demonstrated). Also, the presence alone of these precursors is not sufficient to demonstrate how (or if) they can, in turn, combine into self-replicating molecules such as DNA.

[edit on 4/9/2009 by Phage]



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by schrodingers dog
I especially enjoyed this part:


Professor Chang and his research colleagues show that apparent "extraterrestrial programming" gaps in DNA sequencing precipitated by a hypothesized rush to create human life on Earth presented humankind with illogical growth of mass of cells we know as cancer."

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.
The problem with that is the humans are not the only animals to have cancer, cancer happens in other species, so, if it was the result of "rushing" it was not with humans or not with humans only.

Also, considering that we do not use "junk DNA", it does not surprise me that it did not worked as our body works, that is the whole "idea" of DNA.

As for the opening post, it's obvious that Aliens (if they exist) and Humans may share the same DNA patterns, if it happened once it can happen twice.

But that does not mean that they think that there isn't possible for a different DNA pattern to exist.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 04:41 PM
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Why should life in other areas of the Universe be any different than it is on Earth?
The building blocks of life and genetic patterns themselves must be universal.
We are not unique.
It is past time to get over this narrow Earth centered idea.



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 05:14 PM
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So Phage/ArMap, thanks for chiming in by the way, what they're saying is the amino acids which were needed for life on Earth to emerge are abundant throughout the universe and by deduction it is possible if not likely that similar life may have emerged elsewhere under the right conditions.

If I am getting this right, that is an awful lot of ifs in that statement.

Do you guys have any idea as to why they are willing to use the term "alien life" with such temerity when they know the loaded implications of such semantics?



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by schrodingers dog
 


In cases like this it's usually best to go the the source.

Our results also indicate that a certain degree of universality would be expected in the types of organic molecules seen on other earth-like planets. Should life exist elsewhere, it would not be surprising if it used at least some of the same amino acids we do. Simple sugars, lipids and nucleobases might also be shared.

arxiv.org...



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by schrodingers dog
 


One thing that would be fair to say is that evolution occurrs everywhere in the universe or nowhere. All liefe is the universe must be the product of evolution or none. Peutting aside more escoteric or paranormal explanations for lifes presence.



posted on Apr, 10 2009 @ 12:38 AM
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A bit confused here. 'Scientists' say 'aliens' are fanciful and dillusional - yet, conclude that 'they' share similar DNA structure?? Another example of why I equate 'scientist's statements' on the same tier as those made by 'governmental officials.'

Probably will be asking for a 'bailout' soon.




posted on Apr, 10 2009 @ 01:55 AM
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reply to post by Johnbro
 

Please show which scientists "conclude that 'they' share similar DNA structure". There is nothing, either in the article or the actual paper which concludes this.


Also, please show which "'Scientists' say 'aliens' are fanciful and dillusional".


[edit on 4/10/2009 by Phage]



posted on Apr, 10 2009 @ 03:56 AM
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Imho these articles (excellent ones btw) bring us basically two main conclusions.

1. Even if we don't really know about all other possibilities for complex and self-replicating molecules to exist and form in space, it still shows that the ones that are our own building blocks are found in space, out of the earth. This raises the question about the source of life on earth: it could have been here from the start, or it could have been triggered by some rock from space crashing on the earth, bringing those blocks built already to self-replicate.

2. It tells us that, because those molecules are found elsewhere, not discarding the fact that life potentially could be formed with other molecules, it wouldn't be surprising if we could find life that has also been formed out of the same building blocks, i.e. if extraterrestrial life were very similar to life on earth, it wouldn't be strange beyond reason.

I must add that, even if life has multiple forms here on earth, the DNA seems organised in very definite patterns all over the planet: plants, fish, microbes, dolphins and eagles, horses and dogs, ants and earthworms, every living creature on this planet including us humans, seems to be created from the same basic bricks, and therefore it wouldn't be surprising at all if any other life elsewhere would be too. That doesn't make it different if they're actually looking very different, if they have 8 legs or 2 heads or whatever imagination allows. They would still be, in the end, living creatures made of the same structural elements as ours.

Are we advancing towards understanding how common we may be?



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 01:24 AM
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That is what I'm trying to say too, the reason monkey and human have such high DNA resemblence (?) could be that it is an 'working' model for two legged standing creature, and if we and ET and Monkey could all three be very well alike DNA wise..... Dont need to be harder than that...



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 02:29 AM
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Question:

Do all creatures on Earth carry junk (I hate that word) DNA?
Is it just complex creatures?
Or just humans?

Personally I don't believe there is such a think as junk DNA. It's my opinion that everything serves some purpose and that our understanding of it is somewhat lacking.

Edit to Add:
I think it was last year sometime that I read an article stating that DNA has similar characteristics to that of a 16 Bit code. Can anyone confirm this or was it all bunk?

IRM

[edit on 15/4/09 by InfaRedMan]



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 07:05 AM
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reply to post by InfaRedMan
 

All creatures have 'junk DNA', but the percentage of it changes across species. Despite it's name, 'junk DNA' is a likely candidate for maintaining the integrity of genetic codes as they mutate through generations. New Scientist did an article which I can't link to but I remember the details. IIRC the more the junk DNA, the greater the chances that the organism will be limited in possible gene mutations. Nemotode worms can have around three quarter junk DNA and are less subject to dramatic changes in gene mutation. Their environmrnt is less demanding of natural selection and the junk DNA builds up. Humans have way less junk DNA and are therefore more likely to assimilate gene mutations through natural selection...I think



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 07:23 AM
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Originally posted by OhZone
Why should life in other areas of the Universe be any different than it is on Earth?
The building blocks of life and genetic patterns themselves must be universal.
We are not unique.
It is past time to get over this narrow Earth centered idea.

True, however it's the length of time the civilization has existed which determines how different they will be. A civilization a million years ahead of us, with the same building blocks as us, will still be completely different. They will be very very advanced technologically and mentally, most likely a lot more self-aware and conscious than we are now, and most likely a lot more spiritual.

I say all that because judging by our own history, our technology and spirituality has increased dramatically in these hundred years, so jump forward another million years and it should be even more amazing. Although we do go through cycles it seems of advanced civilizations, each one is still one-up the previous.



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