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Do it yourself power

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posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 05:12 PM
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I've been musing over the idea of generating my own power via wind or solar. I was wondering if there was some information out there on "do it yourself" methods so that I don't have to pay $30,000 to do it.

I don't need a huge amount of power, just enough to keep the fridge and maybe a freezer running.

I have access to decent winds(north in winter, south in summer), a pond, and of course the sun. I figured this would be the best place to find some answers.




posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 05:23 PM
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Farmers have been using small windmills to generate limited power for years. I imagine that plans should be easy to find online and, with a little know-how (welding, electrical, etc.) and a lot of elbow grease, it should be a very low-cost solution. It's definitely the best solution, as I don't think there is a whole lot of way around the cost of the cells for solar (although, you could always search heavy equipment and surplus auctions for some used solar gear.)

Good luck! If you do end up building something, please share your story and photos.



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 05:27 PM
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reply to post by dragonking76
 


Why not head down to a mechanics shop and ask? They have access to some good plans.

And there's always interesting links on Prison Planet advertising solar power and what not.



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 05:40 PM
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Checking this site out at the moment. I'm new to it all, so figure the simpler I start out the better.

greenterrafirma.com...

So far seems like good info. I thought maybe someone in the survival area had done this before, perhaps some first hand experience that's not so "essayish."



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 06:48 PM
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Best place on the interweb for homebrew power is OTHERPOWER

They explain theory behind the different ways of generating power, as well as go step by step through the various projects.

They cover wind, water, and solar.

I simply haven't found a better site and I search daily.



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 06:56 PM
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reply to post by dragonking76
 

That's a cool idea. I support it all the way. Too bad we can't diy our government.



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 07:13 PM
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Originally posted by hotrodturbo7

Best place on the interweb for homebrew power is OTHERPOWER


Excellent, this goes from the smallest (computer fans) to much larger. I believe I'll start with something to power a light bulb and if successful move up(or out) from there. Haven't gotten to the waterwheels yet, but will likely check that out too.

Reply to Beach Bum:
One step at a time.



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 07:17 PM
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I had to deal with this "well my parents did"
When I was in grade school 20 some years ago "tellin my age"

Ours was "home made"
prop
a/c motor
ac/dc converter/deverter
gear box"transmition" from hydrostatic lawn tractor
and some Mcguyvering

They had one that was direct wired to the main fuse pannel, in our home.
All was fine for around 10 years, but the first time my father made more than we needed, we got a letter......
Thats about all I remember, but long story short is:
the local power CO. "private contractor" had to cut him a check, for the remainder of the absorbed current that was used "not by us"
I will call him tonight, and ask details.
The check was for like $5.00 ...He said he never cashed it and still has it for spite!
So befor you go to far.
Figure out, what are your plans and be ready to answer them..
Or just plain ole hide it?



posted on Apr, 8 2009 @ 07:11 PM
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reply to post by dragonking76
 



Originally posted by hotrodturbo7
Best place on the interweb for homebrew power is OTHERPOWER


Definately the best 'one stop shop' for home brew power systems out there.

If you want to keep costs down, wind power is a good way to start for a low budget system

I'd recommend looking at the Chispito design, based on a DC Treadmill motor, and cheap to buy from new (and far cheaper to order if you are in the US as shipping costs to the UK are horrendous). They're ruggedly built and simple motor units if they ever require refurbishing (brush or bearing replacement)

The design has been tweaked and rated as producing around 200watts by the Otherpower folk, which when compared to a solar PV setup of the same output, comes in at a fraction of the cost.

The other major design is based on the 'Axial Flux' design by Hugh Piggott at Scoraig Wind. The 'reciepe book' he publishes and sells via his site has designs for neodymium magnet-based alternators with a capacity from 250watts of up to 3Kw output...enough to power the average house!

The axial flux design requires a fair amount of construction, from blade carving, to metal fabrication and welding, but if you have a tinkering streak can be built easily enough. There are weekend build-workshops run that you can attend to get hands-on instruction in how to build one, and are damn good fun..

I attended one of these build-sessions last summer and was a blast...here's the write-up of the session so you can get an idea of what's involved Wind Turbine build-weekend

[edit on 8-4-2009 by citizen smith]



posted on Apr, 8 2009 @ 08:15 PM
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If you have good prevailing winds, that would be your best bet. Solar is great, but less dependable even than wind and very expensive.

I came across Kansas Wind Power a while back when shopping for surplus motors. They had a great price on one, and I got great service ordering it. It's apparently a small enterprise (as in a one-man operation), but I consider that a plus as well. They not only carry surplus motors, but also about everything you need to set up a windmill generator.

One suggestion: if you're going to be completely off the grid, include a back-up power system for those days when the wind just isn't up to par or when something breaks and needs fixing. Just use the wind power to charge a bank of 12-volt car batteries and then use an inverter to make the 12VDC into 110VAC. Might cost a couple bucks for that, but it'll be well worth it in the long run.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 8 2009 @ 08:38 PM
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I talk about my setup here:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Total cost: under 18,000
Can run neccesities only, in a pinch!
If you are interested in something to do your whole house,
you could run a diesel or propane backup generator instead.
I wanted self sufficiency with my setup.

[edit on 8-4-2009 by dodadoom]



posted on Apr, 8 2009 @ 08:54 PM
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Excellent post !!

You have me wondering just what would be needed to take my home of the grid and how much would it cost to get me there .



posted on Apr, 8 2009 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by Max_TO
 

In my estimation, on average, from 30 to 70 thousand total cost depending
on different factors to power an entire house. The hard part is providing the 220 power for water heater, stove, etc.
And then you need a way to store it. At night is when we use heavy power!
Thats also when theres no sun! Very hard to provide all that power at the right time! It is so much cheaper to save power than try to make it!
Think conservation! Because it will be even more critical later with your system. The thing to do is build in the systems with the house design from the start.
Retrofitting existing structures is sometimes very hard and usually expensive to do. If you started with the right appliances, lighting, heat
and so forth, then it would be better and easier.

Talk to electricians, technicians and other people you know and meet.
The more you learn the easier it is to understand it all.
Maybe this will help someone...
Good luck!



posted on Apr, 8 2009 @ 10:07 PM
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Originally posted by dodadoom
In my estimation, on average, from 30 to 70 thousand total cost depending
on different factors to power an entire house. The hard part is providing the 220 power for water heater, stove, etc.


Bloody hell, thats a good percentage of the price of an entire house! It could be done far cheaper, as much as a tenth of the cost if you're canny

There are a number of excellent publications on how to design a system capable of taking a house completely off grid, and the more work you put in yourself, the lower the total project budget will be. Not to mention that you'll know the workings inside and out and able to trouble-shoot any problems if/when they happen (and sods law says will do at the least convenient moment)



posted on Apr, 8 2009 @ 10:24 PM
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I can give you a link to a website that you can order a free energy CD for $10 usd. It has 71 pdf files with do it yourself plans for many devices including wind turbines, solar cells, hydrogen fuel cells, motionless electromagnetic generators, even a Tesla coil. it even has a patent with diagrams for an anti gravity aircraft, shaped like a saucer??? I own the cd myself and is highly recommended.

Free energy cd

Here is a website where you can order rare earth magnets for wind turbines. N52 is the strongest know to us mortals.

K&J Magnetics



[edit on 8-4-2009 by timewalker]



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 10:16 AM
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Yep, good idea is to start small doing-it-yourself.

I've built a solar generator for a mere £120 which is a single deep cell battery and wired through to a the solar cell along with an inverter. Plus a battery box for it to go in along with a wooden mount screwed into the top of the box.

It is completely man portable. Simply pick-it-up and go



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 10:42 AM
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I recently trashed a large treadmill the other day and took the motor out. I powered it with a 12-Volt 7.2 Ah Sealed lead acid battery. That's enough juice to use the motor as a regular small house fan. I had a full charge even after 18 months with out charging. Can I make anything out of this? Is there a way I can power small appliances with the motor? I really am just interested in powering Lights(5 fluorescent) or a single fridge. [edit] I also have a spare car battery that I would like to link with the 12volt, any help on connecting those two together would be nice as well.

Thanks

Here is the motor. (2HP, 4RPM, 90V, Direct current Magnet)
Not exactly this one but close enough.



Here is the battery.



[edit on 9-4-2009 by Gouki]



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 12:16 PM
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So i have a question,

When looking at wind power, why cant one use a 230w heavy duity car alternator from a junk yard instead of a purchased unit from some where?

I'm sure you would have to use some gears to get the RPM's up on the alternator compared to the turn of the blades, But seems to me that one could build a decent set up for under $500 or so (if purchased alternator new) and get quite a bit of power from it.
Granted a car alternator is not going to make mass power, but at the price you can get them at the junk yard it would seem a good option. And they have built in regulators normaly.
5 or 10 of them could produce quite a bit of power.

speaking of, anyone had the idea to build a wind generator to hang off your rv/camper ? let it charge your system while you are driving, so when you get there the batteries are fully peaked?



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 01:00 PM
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reply to post by severdsoul
 


May I direct you to this Otherpower page, as it seems to answer that question fully.

Basically, what you gain in mechanical advantage by gearing up the car alternator to operate at an RPM to generate power, you equaly lose those gains in friction and other inefficiencies. If you have access to a hydro source with a decent head of water, then it may work, as water power will generate far more torque than wind power, so the mechanical gearing losses at the generator-head are are far less critical

This is where Hugh Piggott's 'Axial Flux' design excels...it can be designed to suit a low RPM wind current, voltage of power supply to the inverter or any other factor that will be the main influence of the design.

If you have a limited budget of $500 then I'd suggest abandoning the vehicle alternator route, and go either axial-flux or treadmill motor.

You can pick up brandnew DC treadmill motors for $30-40 apeice, the batteries, perhaps $200 max for a decent supply capacity (as you will need spare power-draw ability on no-wind days but without slimming down electrical demand), $100 max for an inverter, and the remaining $150 for cabling, charge controller, and otehr materials, such as wooden planks for blade blanks that can be carved by hand.

An entire set up for just as much as you are prepared to spend on the powerplant alone!

[edit on 9-4-2009 by citizen smith]



posted on Apr, 9 2009 @ 02:20 PM
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Originally posted by citizen smith
reply to post by severdsoul
 


May I direct you to this Otherpower page, as it seems to answer that question fully.

Basically, what you gain in mechanical advantage by gearing up the car alternator to operate at an RPM to generate power, you equaly lose those gains in friction and other inefficiencies. If you have access to a hydro source with a decent head of water, then it may work, as water power will generate far more torque than wind power, so the mechanical gearing losses at the generator-head are are far less critical

This is where Hugh Piggott's 'Axial Flux' design excels...it can be designed to suit a low RPM wind current, voltage of power supply to the inverter or any other factor that will be the main influence of the design.

If you have a limited budget of $500 then I'd suggest abandoning the vehicle alternator route, and go either axial-flux or treadmill motor.

You can pick up brandnew DC treadmill motors for $30-40 apeice, the batteries, perhaps $200 max for a decent supply capacity (as you will need spare power-draw ability on no-wind days but without slimming down electrical demand), $100 max for an inverter, and the remaining $150 for cabling, charge controller, and otehr materials, such as wooden planks for blade blanks that can be carved by hand.

An entire set up for just as much as you are prepared to spend on the powerplant alone!

[edit on 9-4-2009 by citizen smith]

Great Info, i have a lot of reading to do. But it makes sence.
Thanks for the advice.
I will have to do some digging into a tread mill motor
Thanks again.




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