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F-16s Tracking Stolen Cessna

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posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:03 PM
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reply to post by Jay-in-AR
 


Flight schools everywhere leave the keys in the aircraft. That way they don't have to worry about losing them, and since they're in secured areas they feel that they can leave them safely in the plane.

It didn't have external fuel tanks, it had extra tanks inside the aircraft. I only have a few hours of flight under my belt in a Cessna, and I could plan a flight heading from here to Missouri or here to Ontario in a few hours.

[edit on 4/6/2009 by Zaphod58]




posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:04 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by Jay-in-AR
 


He didn't "penetrate" he was allowed in. They don't shoot planes down unless they're an obvious threat. This one wasn't, or it would have been shot down.

I disagree with you here. He actually penetrated. What if he had a nuke on the plane? Or a biological? It goes off. Then do we say we 'allowed' him in? The end result, allowed or not, is that HE GOT IN.

[edit on 6-4-2009 by Alienmojo]



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:07 PM
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reply to post by Alienmojo
 


What are they supposed to do, shoot down every plane that enters the US without radio contact or transponders? Do you have ANY idea how many that is a MONTH? It's a lot. And most of them are either simple pilot error.

They took the action that made the most sense to them, and everything turned out just fine. They can't shoot down every plane that enters the US and doesn't talk to them, or have a transponder turned on. Just because someone steals a plane doesn't mean that they are a terrorist, or are planning something bad. They may have something wrong in the head, or they may be trying to kill themselves and hoping that they shoot them down.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
reply to post by schrodingers dog
 


Also, you should check the AIM or your Jeppesen ...


You don't have to tell me twice, I'll do that right now.


Now where did I put that Jeppesen ...


In all seriousness thanks ww, that's some great info.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:11 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Just wait for it.

By tomorrow we'll hear that the pilot had ties to Al Qaeda.
Then realize that Al Qaeda was actually legitimized by the US Government.

False Flag.

Yeah, I have never flown anything, so your critique over my lack of knowledge of external vs. internal extra fuel storage is legitimate, and I concede that point.

I'm just curious if you'll concede my extremely early call that this guy was a part of some terrorist organization...

Forget the false flag idea.

When I say "false flag" I obviously mean that he was with some sort of boogey man organization.
Is he, or is he not?



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:12 PM
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I think some authorities need to be notified that the folks running that flight school are a bunch of idiots.


Why would you say the folks running that flight school are a bunch of idiots? Because somebody stole a Cessna? Is it their fault he stole the plane? And if you're basing your judgment on the fact that a different dude posting here jokingly said the keys were left in the ignition.... the guy was joking man.

By your own logic, next time somebody steals your car, you'd be the idiot. Even if I didn't particularly like you, I've got more common sense than to call you the idiot if somebody stole your car. Where's the logic in that?



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by Albertarocks
 


Actually, if you hadn't read, the sentiments were echoed by an esteemed "pilot" here.
Apparently the keys ARE left in the ignition in these places...

Funny though, what seems easiest to me is to lock them up in an office..


But that's just me.
Alberta sucks, btw.

PS - Alright, alright, I'll take it back Alberta is beautiful.
But yeah, I would be an idiot if I left my keys in my Corvette and without expecting it to be stolen.



[edit on 6-4-2009 by Jay-in-AR]

[edit on 6-4-2009 by Jay-in-AR]



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:18 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Zaph....maybe in Canada they leave the keys in the airplane....

Back in the 70s, when I Flight Instructed, we always kept the keys in the office...UNLESS someone called and intended to rent the airplane during the hours when the office was closed....we would put the logbook in the airplane, lock the doors and put the keys under the nosewheel.

There WAS a measure of trust....but, airplanes could be stolen. happened to us....somebody rented, legitimately....copied the key, and came back late at night (Tower was closed between 2300-0600) and stole the airplane for illicit purposes. We were lucky, it was spotted by another loyal customer, quite by chance, parked in Baja Mexico. (The other customer knew the airplane....in fact, that's the one he was scheduled to rent!!! He had to settle for a different one...) Perfect serendipity.

Still....don't know how this C-172 made it so far....hope this story has legs.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:23 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


lol, kinda makes you wonder if it would be worthwhile to deflate the tires while not in use... and carry a pump on-board.

Would be funny to see someone try to achieve takeoff speed on flat tires.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by johnsky
 


Probably easier just to lock the keys up in an office and either a) take the prop off the plane or b) put a lock on the prop...

Something like "The Club."

Or a "Boot" that is used for abandoned cars.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


We had two sets of keys. We left one on the aircraft and one in the office. We kept the planes parked right next to a hangar, so we left the keys there in case they had to fire up the plane and move it. Or if the mechanics had to take it back for a 50 hour check. The school I was dispatcher for was in a pretty busy area so we never had a problem with anyone trying to take the aircraft.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:29 PM
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As per CNN:




Federal, state and local authorities launched a manhunt for the pilot, who was identified by the FBI as Adam Leon, 31, a native of Turkey who became a Canadian citizen last year, according to FBI spokesman Richard Kolko. He was formerly known as Yavuz Berke, though officials did not indicate a reason for the name change.

He was taken into custody at an Ellsinore grocery story after a brief manhunt, according to Missouri state police and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.


edition.cnn.com...


I guess the poor shlep will have some serious debriefing to go through.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


At least when I lived there Honolulu Hawaii was the US capital of stolen cars.

Pretty busy city. Approx. 1 million residents and up to the same amount of tourists at any time.

Not only were there a bunch of folks, but the island was... well, and island...
People still stole cars.

Like I said... Idiots.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:30 PM
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So, this joker is a Turkish born citizen who logged a 'few' hours on Cessna yet manages to land it on a dirt road and put it under a culvert (low bridge). No, his motives are harmless, I'm sure!


news



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:33 PM
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More news coming out as we speak, I'm sure the dude with the fighter jet as his avatar will be conceding shortly...
...
.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by traderjack
 


I had two hours in a sail plane and was making landings. I made my first landing on my third flight, with less than an hour and a half, and by two hours I was doing all the landings.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:34 PM
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Originally posted by finemanm


He was taken into custody at an Ellsinore grocery story after a brief manhunt...




Grocery store?

"Hi, I'm in a bit of a hurry, do you have a Cessna ..."



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:34 PM
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Originally posted by Jay-in-AR
reply to post by johnsky
 


Probably easier just to lock the keys up in an office and either a) take the prop off the plane or b) put a lock on the prop...

Something like "The Club."

Or a "Boot" that is used for abandoned cars.



I'm assuming it's allot like sailing in that docking and storing the ship costs almost more than owning the thing does, once it's been paid for that is.

AS such, I'd assume many pilots just wind up going for the cheapest storage means possible... which could wind up being outdoors near the tarmac.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by Jay-in-AR
 


So what the hell am I supposed to be conceding here? There is nothing to concede, because this wasn't a false flag op. What was it supposed to be a false flag op FOR exactly? Nothing happened.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by traderjack
 


The REALLY awesome coincidence is how you can draw a direct parallel to the 9-11 hijackers who supposedly, with similar training and background, were able to accomplish even MORE amazing feats with their multi-engine turbine rigs....

Like flying one into the pentagon at about 10 feet above ground level at cruising speed without touching the ground below them..


These middle eastern people are natural-born pilots.



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