Caves. Are they safe?

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posted on Apr, 4 2009 @ 04:59 PM
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Originally posted by kiwifoot
reply to post by nixie_nox
 


I don't suppose you know if there are any types of rock that would protect against radiation more than others?

Thanks for your advice!


Research it




posted on Apr, 4 2009 @ 05:14 PM
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Originally posted by Anuubis
reply to post by jfj123
 

A good arguement except for the fact that you are wrong about one thing. The "fact" that it is based on is still THEORETICAL SCIENCE. All based on theory.



And our theories and beliefs don't belong in this thread. It has nothing to do with the topic.

[edit on 4-4-2009 by Anuubis]


I don't want to get too far off topic but you've dragged it there by posting erroneous information.
Yes it's based on THEORETICAL SCIENCE. You're absolutely correct. Unfortunately I need to explain the definition of THEORETICAL SCIENCE to you.
Here's a wonderful definition for you to choke on

In science, a theory is not a guess, not a hunch. It's a well-substantiated, well-supported, well-documented explanation for our observations.2 It ties together all the facts about something, providing an explanation that fits all the observations and can be used to make predictions. In science, theory is the ultimate goal, the explanation. It's as close to proven as anything in science can be.


Thanks for agreeing with me
Remember, you said it, "it's based on THEORETICAL SCIENCE". Your own words

Check and mate



posted on Apr, 4 2009 @ 05:49 PM
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Ultimately caves would only be good to hide or for shelter from the elements. Nothing more.

If you were to start a fire for heat, do so near the entrance and don't start a large fire at first. Start a small fire and slowly increase the amount of wood so the fire heats up slowly thus heating up the rock in the cave ceiling slowly. If you heat up the cave too quickly, you can risk a cave in or at the very least, rocks falling from the ceiling.



posted on Apr, 4 2009 @ 08:32 PM
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12 feet of earth will shield from all radiation. However it will not protect from radioactive fallout in air and water.

I don't think 12 feet of earth will protect you from a neutron bomb. Neutrons neutral charge allow them to pass easily through dense matter, and lead is useless as a neutron shield.

Neutrons have an affinity for things with high hydrogen content, like water and human bodies.


On the bright side, most of the direct exposure to radioactive materials which are the secondary killer after the initial burst, occurs to people out in the open, in the form of an ash fall. Don't go out for the first three days.
Wait for a rain before going out, drink only bottled water. When you do start to drink the water again, filter it through charcoal filters.

Stay out of the ash fall.

[edit on 4-4-2009 by Cyberbian]



posted on Apr, 4 2009 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by Cyberbian
12 feet of earth will shield from all radiation. However it will not protect from radioactive fallout in air and water.

I don't think 12 feet of earth will protect you from a neutron bomb. Neutrons neutral charge allow them to pass easily through dense matter, and lead is useless as a neutron shield.

Neutrons have an affinity for things with high hydrogen content, like water and human bodies.


On the bright side, most of the direct exposure to radioactive materials which are the secondary killer after the initial burst, occurs to people out in the open, in the form of an ash fall. Don't go out for the first three days.
Wait for a rain before going out, drink only bottled water. When you do start to drink the water again, filter it through charcoal filters.

Stay out of the ash fall.

[edit on 4-4-2009 by Cyberbian]


Actually the most lethal part of a nuclear detonation is the release of Gamma radiation. No natural matter can block it and it's devastating to living tissue.



posted on Apr, 4 2009 @ 09:42 PM
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Well, for a few hundred grand, you could buy a nice cave house. It would be easily wiped out by a thermobaric bomb but more than likely free of bat dung. lol






posted on Apr, 4 2009 @ 09:49 PM
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In Huntsville Alabama the city took some money that the government handed out for security from terrorism after 911 and use it to make shelters incase of nuclear attacks.

I know one of the shelters they are going to use is a cave up there open to tourist. So I guess they figure that caves are a good place.

I don't think I would want to go to this place though because its bring our own food and stuff with you. What happens to those that bring food and supplies when those that didn't want yours?

I also don't like the big metal bars and gates at the entrance to it either. They told me thats to keep people out when the cave is closed. But I thought or keep them in if they want out also.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 04:04 AM
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Cave roof collapse kills teenager
A teenager has been killed and another seriously hurt after a cave roof partially collapsed in Shropshire.

Part of the Hermitage Cave near Bridgnorth fell on a group of teenagers camping there overnight, West Midlands Ambulance Service said.

A teenage boy died in the collapse at about 0150 BST.

An 18-year-old girl from Bridgnorth suffered back, neck and rib injuries. Her condition is potentially serious but not considered life threatening.


Story from BBC NEWS:
news.bbc.co.uk...



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 05:20 AM
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reply to post by Northern Raider
 


oh s't..

That sounds like a bugout trial run gone very wrong


I offer my prayers for the family of the lad that died, and wishes for a full recovery for his friend



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 10:57 PM
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Caves. Are they safe?

In 2 words, it depends.

In 1 word, NO.



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 11:11 PM
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Originally posted by jfj123
If you were to start a fire for heat, do so near the entrance and don't start a large fire at first.


Not always. There are occasions when it makes more sense to set the fire at the rear of the cave. This way the smoke will rise up and out along the roof, rather than back up into your cave.



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 09:27 AM
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Caves ARE safe, Caves AREN'T safe, think I'd just hide under the duvet and hope for the best.

Second line incase of any hassle .

[edit on 7/4/09 by DataWraith]



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 09:41 AM
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reply to post by kiwifoot
 


Caves would be extremely unsafe if there was a pole shift.

The best place you could possibly be is on flat land away from fault lines and mountains at high altitude prepared for high winds. A dome tent would work great.



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by ShowMeEvil
reply to post by kiwifoot
 


Caves would be extremely unsafe if there was a pole shift.

The best place you could possibly be is on flat land away from fault lines and mountains at high altitude prepared for high winds. A dome tent would work great.





But I guess it all depends on what happens to the geology in your area during a pole shift?

I guess in that case we all just make peace with the maker and kiss our asses goodbye!



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by DataWraith
 


You are so right..beginning to regret the thread....next time will just ask what a good brand of duvet is! Lol!



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 04:34 PM
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Originally posted by Northern Raider

Cave roof collapse kills teenager
A teenager has been killed and another seriously hurt after a cave roof partially collapsed in Shropshire.

Part of the Hermitage Cave near Bridgnorth fell on a group of teenagers camping there overnight, West Midlands Ambulance Service said.

A teenage boy died in the collapse at about 0150 BST.

An 18-year-old girl from Bridgnorth suffered back, neck and rib injuries. Her condition is potentially serious but not considered life threatening.


Story from BBC NEWS:
news.bbc.co.uk...


Dude.....are you trying to help me or what !!!!!! lOL!



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 04:35 PM
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Are caves safe? Probably not. Are they potentially safer than being outside of the cave in some type of major disaster? Quite possibly.

As with anything, weigh the risks and benefits. I, for one, would rather take the chance that a cave might collapse upon me and trap me 100 feet inside than sit in my house with radioactive fallout falling 10 feet away outside the walls, for example.



posted on Apr, 18 2009 @ 08:42 AM
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depends on the kind of cave and cave material, i know of a few here in north eastern pennsylvania made out of a quartz like granite that are more like giant boulders that fell in the right spots to form caves rather than actual underground networks but some of them are actually mildly deep and i wont go in them unless i have a sidearm because of the very acute animal musk smell eminating from them but i do have a very shallow one to serve as a last resort on the literal top of the low mnt's here





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