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Prosecuting American War Crimes

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posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 10:58 PM
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Prosecuting American War Crimes


rinf.com

Did Americans commit war crimes by torturing detainees at Guantanamo Bay or at secret prisons scattered around Europe? Barack Obama doesn’t want to know. Former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales was one of many who felt confident he would never face prosecution for his role in constructing legal rationales for waterboarding and other forms of torture.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 10:58 PM
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War crimes? and Americans prosecuted? I have to pinch myself to believe it! Gitmo is still a dilemma for the US, though Obama has said that he intends to close it down.

There have been a few excesses in Iraq and Afghanistan, but war crimes, I dont think there is any evidence of that.

Yes there has been the Abu Graib torture scandal and the Blackwater episode in Iraq, but some from the military have already been punished for that

We know that there were secret prisons in Europe and that prisoners were tortured there. Some of them have now been closed down due to international pressure. As for water boarding, it can be carried out anywhere, you dont need Gitmo for that.

The real "crime" America commits is it's attitude of global hegemony and partisan relationships with a few countries at the expense of others. The global power equation is slowly changing, China and India are emerging as the only growing economies in this slowdown and Russia is always a power to reckon. I think American dominance on the world stage is on a decline in the next few decades

rinf.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 2-4-2009 by sunny_2008ny]



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 11:38 PM
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Originally posted by sunny_2008ny

War crimes? and Americans prosecuted? I have to pinch myself to believe it! Gitmo is still a dilemma for the US, though Obama has said that he intends to close it down.

There have been a few excesses in Iraq and Afghanistan, but war crimes, I dont think there is any evidence of that.





Does torture and murder of detainees by CIA and Special Forces qualify as evidence of war crimes?

action.aclu.org...


Just the tip of the iceburg. Absolutely guaranteed. You can't depend on the MSM to get an accurate picture of what the government is doing. The MSM is in bed with the government.



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 01:16 AM
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A Timely article by John Pilger

Fake Faith and Epic Crimes


Also if anyone is interested to see an actual legal brief submitted to the International Criminal Court ,the folowing is curently being processed by the ICC and details former Australian Prime Minister John Howard's war crimes in Iraq. The legal Arguments would be all but identical for Bush and Blair

(link is to MS Word Doc)

BRIEF

.



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 01:26 AM
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Originally posted by sunny_2008ny


There have been a few excesses in Iraq and Afghanistan, but war crimes, I dont think there is any evidence of that.



Us going over there in the first place was a war crime, I suggest you read up on international law.

And I certainly hope the Spanish are successful in prosecuting these people, if they succeed maybe the bigger fish (read: Bush, Cheney) will go down as well. I was pretty disappointed that Obama didn't do anything as far as trials, but then again, he probably never would have gotten elected if he had planned to.



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 01:29 AM
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Bush should be sent on trial and be given the same treatment as Saddam got and the whole US should go on trial for wreaking the world economy



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 01:32 AM
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Originally posted by Appollion
Bush should be sent on trial and be given the same treatment as Saddam got and the whole US should go on trial for wreaking the world economy


That's moronic. We didn't all ruin the economy, and plenty of us aren't even responsible for voting in the jackasses that did.

Besides, the world economy would hardly exist in the state it does without the US.



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 01:43 AM
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reply to post by drwizardphd
 


As far as I know the Sub prime bubble blew in the US bringing down financial institutions around the world. Now people in other parts of the world are losing their job and lives destroyed because the Americans live beyond their means.



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 02:02 AM
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Originally posted by Appollion
reply to post by drwizardphd
 


As far as I know the Sub prime bubble blew in the US bringing down financial institutions around the world. Now people in other parts of the world are losing their job and lives destroyed because the Americans live beyond their means.


That's also moronic. We didn't all live beyond our means. There are still many thousands of responsible, hardworking people in America who live well within their means. You're just generalizing and making yourself look foolish.



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 02:31 AM
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Originally posted by sunny_2008ny
There have been a few excesses in Iraq and Afghanistan, but war crimes, I dont think there is any evidence of that.


Ummm...yes there is. Is the Red Cross a suitable enough source for this?

rawstory.com...




It's official: Red Cross report says Bush Administration tortured prisoners

Graphic report describes inhumane tactics

US interrogators attached detainees to collars like dogs and used their leashes to slam them against walls, forced them to stand for days wearing only diapers, and tied detainees necks with towels and threw them against plywood walls, according to accounts in a secret 2007 report issued by the Red Cross to be printed in a New York magazine and leaked on Monday.

The report -- issued by the International Committee of the Red Cross and kept secret for the last two years -- is the first first-hand document to legally say the Bush Administration's harsh interrogation techniques "constituted torture." They strongly imply that CIA interrogators violated international law.

The Red Cross was the only organization to get access to high-value detainees that were transferred to Guantanamo Bay from secret prisons US in 2006. It contains accounts from the prisoners, who were held in different locations but offered remarkably uniform tales of abuse at the hands of US agents.

Techniques amounted to "cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment," the report states. Such treatment is explicitly barred by the Geneva Conventions.

The Red Cross report is perhaps the most harrowing to date in describing what appear to be routine US practices authorized by the Bush Administration. They include beatings, sleep deprivation, extreme temperatures, collaring and simulated drowning.

But the report goes further: Prisoners were routinely beaten, stripped, doused with freezing water and loud music, and kept awake for days with their arms shackled above them, wearing only diapers.

"On a daily basis . . . a collar was looped around my neck and then used to slam me against the walls of the interrogation room," the report quotes detainee Walid Muhammad bin Attash, as saying, according to a story today. He was wrapped in a plastic sheet, he said, as cold water was "poured onto my body with buckets."

"I would be wrapped inside the sheet with cold water for several minutes," he said. "Then I would be taken for interrogation."

One captive said his neck was tied with a towel and then he was repeatedly swung into a plywood wall mounted in his cell. He was often slapped in the face and then placed in a coffin-like wooden box and forced to crouch with his air supply restricted.

"The stress on my legs held in this position meant my wounds both in my leg and stomach became very painful," he told the Red Cross.

Afterward -- as if this wasn't enough -- he was waterboarded by being strapped to what looked like a hospital bed.

"A black cloth was then placed over my face and the interrogators used a mineral bottle to pour water on the cloth so that I could not breathe," he said.

"I struggled against the straps, trying to breathe, but it was hopeless," he added. "I though I was going to die."

The Washington Post said Monday that at least five copies of the report had been shared with the CIA and top White House officials in 2007, but barred from public release by ICRC guidelines intended to preserve the group's policy of neutrality in conflicts.

The Post said that at least five copies of the report had been shared with the CIA and top White House officials in 2007, but barred from public release by ICRC guidelines intended to preserve the group's policy of neutrality in conflicts.

The paper quotes an unnamed US official familiar with the report as saying that "it is important to bear in mind that the report lays out claims made by the terrorists themselves."

The report was obtained by Mark Danner, a journalism professor and author who published extensive excerpts in the April 9 edition of the New York Review of Books.



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 02:37 AM
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reply to post by sunny_2008ny

What if it were the other way around?
American soldiers or just plain American civils being tortured (barely, of course, just as American soldiers did to others), were invaded under false pretenses, were held captive in secret prisons all over the world, and by the way, if they are secret, we really don't know what really goes on inside of them, etc.

I hope Gonzales gets that stupid smirk off of his ugly face and gets what he deserves...and then on to Cheney and the rest of them.



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