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MRI's -- a few questions

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posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 02:10 AM
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I underwent an MRI today, as suggested by my neurologist.

I was surprised at how noisy the process was. Also, among a few other curiousities, I discerned three pitches that the machine seemed to generate: low, higher and highest. The highest pitch was only sounded three or four times. It was also the note that concluded the examination.

When it sounded, I felt a peculiar sensation in my body...a feeling of electricity flowing is how I'd best describe it.

I've done some Googling, but aside from some post-examination wooziness, there doesn't seem to be information on people feeling side-effects during the process.

If you've had an MRI, what was your experience like?

Also, why the three different pitches? Is the highest taking the most detailed image?

Cheers,
Fuggle




posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 04:08 AM
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I had 'effects' both during and for a year AFTER an MRI.

Not only that; but, the MRI did not detect (detection "25% failure rate") so I underwent all that for nothing.

Anyway, DURING the MRI my arm siezed up, got a solid 1 1/2 hour cramp, and eventually started vibrating all by itself. Then the other arm started vibrating.

But, I got a more annoying 'effect' IMMEDIATELY following the MRI and had it for a whole YEAR after the MRI! A part of my hand was NUMBISH. It felt swollen but wasn't - it was that swollen sort of numb feeling. It burned to touch the area.

The 3 sounds are speeds I think. They play with your body's electromagnetic water-something or others. The sounds are the speed ups. Wiki had a good article on it.



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 02:42 PM
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Interesting, Trexter!

You had wierd effects and the test tested positive.

Thanks for the response.

F



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 02:55 PM
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MRI's use giants magnets to form an image based off of the natural amount of metal (iron) in your body. What you may have been experiencing was a large influx of magnetic energy pulsing through your body. The imaging center I used to work for had an MRI that used a magnet that was several tons in weight. If you had some metal on you and got too close you could feel it pulling from several feet away. Hope that helps.



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 03:15 PM
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They give me indigestion, lol.

They are also very noisy. Other than that, not much of note.



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 03:47 PM
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I've had a couple of MRIs in the past (for numerous work related soft-tissue injuries). They're noisy and can be uncomfortable due to the positions you may be forced to remain in for the duration of the scan, depending on injury.

However the only real effect that they have on me is that I fall asleep during them because of the rythmic noises they produce. It's a pain when you wake up with a jump, just to be told that the scan has to be repeated because you moved



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 04:13 PM
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I've had more MRI's than I can count over the years and I usually fall asleep just like the last poster. The rhythm does me in and I usually have ear buds full of relaxing music.

[edit on 2-4-2009 by jibeho]



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 06:43 PM
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I own and operate a medical diagnostic imaging center in southern Cali. The different sounds are for different studies. The loudest is what is called a "diffusion" scan that centers on a certain tissue. There are five different tissue frequencies that MRI oscillate towards to capture image assurance.

To date, there has not been one adverse effect contributed to an MRI machine. However, there is a 3.0 Tesla that is gaining popularity for MSK & Nuero doctors that zeros in closer to the detail in between tissue for better clarity reads. But some patients complain of high heat and discomfort, so I doubt it will become industry standard. Right now standard is 1.5 Tesla and I'm almost positive that is what you were in. Unless it was an OPEN MRI.

As Kleverone stated, there are tiny protiens in the body that almost resemble (or act as) tiny magnetic impulses that the MRI Magnet collaborates with. Any other questions, I will be happy to answer.


AAC

[edit on 2-4-2009 by AnAbsoluteCreation]



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 07:35 PM
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Originally posted by Trexter Ziam
Not only that; but, the MRI did not detect (detection "25% failure rate") so I underwent all that for nothing.


After the MRI on my left knee, I was told that nothing was found. About 10 years later I saw another dr who blew off the MRI, because it was obvious something was wrong. What he told me is that the DETECTOR will catch 90+% of all problems, regardless of how small. The problem is the person READING the MRI. The reader misses something like 50% of all problems.



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 07:56 PM
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Never had one done, but I know a little about the MRI machines themselves. Given that their basis for scanning is electro-magnetic, the different pitches you heard could have been the different levels of each scan.

Most electronic devices make a background "hum" that most people learn to tune out. If you've ever lost power and noticed how quiet your house suddenly was, or heard someone enter a room even if they didn't make any noises--what you're detecting, imho, is their body blocking the background "hum" of various electronic devices. You notice when the noise is interrupted, but otherwise... it's just background.

With the MRI doing multiple passes, it could be that each pass is a little stronger, to scan a little deeper, and the boosted electronic "hum" that powers each scan could account for what you heard.

I've never worked with MRI machines, only covered them briefly in a few classes (compare/contrast with spectrographic analysis, mostly) but that's my guess as to what you may have heard.



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 01:27 AM
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Thank you, all, for your input and help.

The MR machine is a Philips Intera Achieva 3.0T scanner--but that's Greek to me.

And aside from that one sensation, I found the experience very, very comfortable and relaxing (the headphones shielded me from the noise well enough so that I could pretty much ignore it).

Cheers!
F



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 08:00 PM
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Originally posted by Fuggle

Thank you, all, for your input and help.

The MR machine is a Philips Intera Achieva 3.0T scanner--but that's Greek to me.

And aside from that one sensation, I found the experience very, very comfortable and relaxing (the headphones shielded me from the noise well enough so that I could pretty much ignore it).

Cheers!
F



Hmmmn i know 100% fact that Tesla make the internals for Philips MRI scanners. I was told by someone at Tesla (in chit chat converstation)that if i ever went in a Phillips scanner anywhere in the world, then there would be a 50% chance that the internals of the scanner are Tesla ones. Taking a logical guess, i would say the 'T' in your Philips Intera Achieva 3.0T, stands for Tesla.




posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 10:43 PM
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Actually all modality magnets are referred as Tesla, it's the industry standard.


Adding eleven characters when your post is perfectly effective with the first line seems weird. But I understand that most one-liners are fruitless.


AAC



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 10:47 PM
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I have had many and always feel heat when they do it. Very uncomfortable.

Maybe I am just strange. When ever I have a cat scan of the head, when it goes over my eyes, I see purple rings, bright flash, and get strange smell.
Every single time. Only explanation I have been given is that it dilates the optic nerve in some people. No idea, but I hate em!



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 10:52 PM
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I actually took my dad to get one about 3 weeks ago. There was a pamplet in the waiting room that described what happens.

I am trying to remember, as I really only skimmed through it.

Something that I found interesting, is that the side effects of getting an MRI (long term and short term) arent really known yet. For that reason they dont usually let pregnant women get them.


The round tube that you are put into is the magnet.

as a matter of fact, here is what the website "howstuffworks.com" Has to say about MRI's

www.howstuffworks.com...

They will know ALOT more than I do. I have not read the whole thing so I don't know if it talks about tones or anything, but I have always heard that they are loud...

I hope this is some help to you!

I also hope that for whatever reason you got the MRI for, that everything is ok.



posted on Apr, 18 2009 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by AnAbsoluteCreation
 


Arghh, i think my contact was talking about it being a 50% chance that the philips mri's would have internals manufactred byTesla Eng UK - to correct myself




Tesla Engineering Limited manufactures resistive and superconducting electro­magnets for particle accelerators of all types, and produces specialised gradient coils for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners. Tesla also supplies electromagnets for emerging applications, such as fusion research and the semiconductor industry.




Tesla provides a complete electromagnetic design, manufacture, and test service, and is certified to ISO 9001:2000, ISO 13485:2003 and ISO 14001:2004. These capabilities are available either individually or as an integrated package, depending on customer requirements.

The aim of the company is to match our products to the customer’s requirements of performance, price, and delivery. We have been designing and building accelerator elements since 1973, and our staff are therefore among the most experienced magnet designers and builders in the world.

Our facilities include state-of-the-art 3D CAD/CAM packages and analysis software, an extensive machine shop, and a modern logistics function.




www.tesla.co.uk...

Tesla are also involved in LHC. Actually that put my mind slightly at ease slightly on the subject of the LHC.



Tesla has recently opened a new factory in Lancing, West Sussex. The facility is entirely dedicated to the production of magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a superconducting particle accelerator under construction at CERN, near Geneva, Switzerland. It features clean assembly facilities, and cryogenic test equipment.


www.tesla.co.uk...


[edit on 18-4-2009 by MCoG1980]



posted on Apr, 18 2009 @ 11:07 PM
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reply to post by Fuggle
 


I have a rather long history of back problems, beginning with Pars Defect, which I was born with. My back was broken for the first time when I was but 15, so I have a long period of X-Rays and MRIs. They do make you feel different. One time, I had a full body MRI that lasted for 45 minutes, back and forth in the machine. When I got out of that thing, I was actually slipping into several different dimensions, and was walking on air. I could see a lot of things and beings that most never can see, no matter how much they believe in, or try to see through ritual. There is something distinctly alien about the MRI process, and I think the original technology may have come from an ET source. In any case, it was quite an experience, to be certain. Alas, I now have 3 1/2 ounces of metal in my back now, so another MRI is out of the question for me. Sure would love that experience again though!



posted on Apr, 18 2009 @ 11:18 PM
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With having MS, I get mri's on an annual basis. So far, Ive had 9 in my life. I am extremely sensitive to going in the tube as far as anxiety is concerned. I dont have claustrophobia either. I always get panick attacks midway and feel like im going to freak out. It is really hard to stay still for 45 minutes... I hate MRI's



posted on Apr, 24 2009 @ 07:37 PM
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I got the results back. No insight into why I get my frequent migraines. Maybe they're just stress-related.

MCoG--you know much more about it than I do. Like I said, it's Greek to me. The hospital I went to is a private hospital in one of New Zealand's richest suburbs...I guess that's why they've got one of the fancy new 3t units.

Anyway, the doctors offered me the CD of the MRI. I guess it's like leaving Disneyland with a Mickey Mouse hat. I'm indifferent about picking it up, but I'm worried I'll hurt their feelings if I don't.

F



posted on Apr, 24 2009 @ 07:50 PM
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i had an MRI for a cardial contusion i recieved when my chest cavity was caved in a high speed accident.

the ink the inject you with IMO is what causes the wooziness you speak of.
the question is should we be worried about being exposed to radiation.
high levels of magnetic activity. they reckon if you have any metal in your body you can't have a MRI. i was told even a filing of steel in your eye will be torn out.

i find it strange how when you get radiology examinations like X-rays everybody else stand behind a big shield and your left there wondering "am i gonna get cancer?"

is their any reported relation to cancer and these types of tests?



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