How 2 measure the emotion of words?

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posted on Apr, 1 2009 @ 10:15 AM
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Is there some mechanism, apparatus, equipment, or technology to measure the emotive force in spoken words. I mean could we speak some thing or read a text into a microphone, then meter would show how many units of emotive force were in that spoken word.

How could attempt to assemble such apparatus?

Any ideas.




posted on Apr, 1 2009 @ 10:52 AM
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Do you mean in the actual word itself or what it means to the speaker?

The words

"Irene Smith"
"Denmark"
"Allergy"

for example, will have provoke different emotional responses to different people. I don't think any words have objective emotional charges by themselves.... unless you had some kit that could measure the quantum group mind of the human species, and that will not be available for centuries.

I think it would be difficult to do what you ask with current commercially available technology, keelynet.com (.org?) is a good website for alt tech.

The only thing I could think of is measuring someone's kirlian field as they speak the word.... Maybe try a search on Kirlian photography

[edit on 14f20093amWed, 01 Apr 2009 10:56:56 -050056 by HiAliens]



posted on Apr, 1 2009 @ 10:56 AM
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Google Utterance numbers....ohhh there are pages of interesting ways to measure just what you are talking about........



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 06:40 AM
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reply to post by HiAliens
 


Well i mean the following:
A)I mean measuring words when spoken by people who understand what they are saying.
B) I mean measuring words when spoken by people who understand the words but dont feel strongly about them.
C) I mean measuring words when spoken by people who refute the meaning of the words.
D)I mean measuring words when spoken by people who do not even know what language the words belong to.

Some where in the limitless universe of innumerable permutations and commutations pf infinite possibilities; is a thought form that is "invoked" by a word. When this word is spoken, it should "summon" that possibility, much like a "Call function" in C++, VBA, etc, computer programming "calls" smaller independant program modules or subroutines, from with in the main program.

Perhaps we look at this situation in light of quantum physics theories and philosophy of logos and language.



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 07:03 AM
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Words are objective until uttered, heard, printed, or read. They then take on a subjective meaning by both the transmitter and the receiver. Words are the tools we use to convey information. The receiver interpets not only the words, but the meaning and motives behind the word whether real or imagined.

It is difficult to convey tone in the written word, but some manage better tha others. Words can hurt or uplift. They are the tools used to convey emotions whether that emotion is love, hate, neither, or both.

Humans render words so subjectively that logic functions would be lost on them.



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 03:10 PM
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Originally posted by KromeDragon
Is there some mechanism, apparatus, equipment, or technology to measure the emotive force in spoken words. I mean could we speak some thing or read a text into a microphone, then meter would show how many units of emotive force were in that spoken word.

How could attempt to assemble such apparatus?

Any ideas.


Voice stress analysis is supported by some, but supposedly picks out only the anxiety/fear class of emotion. It's a questionable method.

There are approaches to coding facial emotions (Ekman's FACS), we can use things like SCR, HR, EMG to assess emotional state, and fMRI could assess neural processes underpinning the perception of emotional intonation/prosody.

But nothing that comes to mind that can assess spoken words for 'emotive force' in the way you're posing it. You could simply ask people to rate such vocal extracts for emotional intensity. Here's a study along the lines of what you're thinking...

www.pennscience.org...

Not 'emotional force' per se, but is one study determining the characteristics of affective prosody for some basic emotions.

Hope that's helpful.

[edit on 2-4-2009 by melatonin]



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 11:52 PM
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What about Logos. It means in one context, the Word, that is a name of
G-d, as spoken by G-d Himself.

This referred to by the New Testament: In the begining was the Word; the Word was with G-d; And the Word was G-d."

Such a name is therefore "alive". It should radiate its emotive force simply from the dried ink particles that spell the letters of G-d's Name on the paper.

Is this not the true case for G-d's name as YHWH? This name is un-utterable, just as the true nature of G-d is unfathomable. But YHWH is a "code". It represents G-d's soveriegn identity throughout the Universal Matrix of Creation.

So the word YHWH should radiate its emotive force simply from the dried ink particles that spell the letters of G-d's Name YHWH, on the paper. Infact from the moment the words are penned (typed) by the inscriber, the inscribers ethereal intent is entered or dialled-in, with the letters written down. These are sufficient to activate the emotive power in this written word.

I understand that at this point our discussion enters the realm of theosophy. But it is relevant to the discussion.
Any ideas or inputs?





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