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A Holiday to Remember?

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posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 05:37 PM
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Let’s say that you are not out of work and/or living hand to mouth under economic pressures and you have rewarded yourself with a week away somewhere. It may be in the same country, it may be on another continent.

A SitX kicks-off. It isn’t necessarily one that affects your current position, it might be one back at home.

Now, this isn’t a, “You have X, Y and Z. Get out of that one smeg-head!” but I can’t be the only one who’s considered the possibility of being caught out with only sun-bloc and loud bermudas as self defence.

What got me thinking is that I will hopefully be bogging off on hols in the near future. The first thing that occurred was that with aircraft and a foreign (albeit EU) country involved there may be items that I’m prevented from taking, knives/box-cutters being the obvious one. Finding out what the airline/airport/country permits is a good bet, then at least you could have a modified “BOB de vacances”.

Obviously, depending on the SitX depends on how you would react but I think being out the country and caught in one, or one occurring back home in your absence is something to mull over for all those preparing to holiday.

Thoughts and considerations?




posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 06:37 PM
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reply to post by Nirgal
 


We try to drive every where, I know you d@mn yanks and your cars, but I can then carry most every thing I need. Going into Mexico could be a problem but I have been there and didn't leave a thing behind. Canada is cool and with the proper paper work it is not a big deal crossing the boarder with a rifle or shotgun. Some limitations apply. If I have to fly I check my bag, kind of a yuppy bob with my knife and leatherman in the checked bag. I do not travel to California as that is worse than Mexico.



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 08:48 PM
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I don't know if you are in America, or Europe, nor do I know how it is different in Europe. But America, don't bring any, ANY liquids, like shampoo. Don't check any cell phone, carry on only. They are often used as detonators. If you can, don't bother checking anything, but carry on only. Nothing gets lost, and you have it all, immediately. If you want more, send it in a box via mail, before you go. Use it, then mail it back. The last thing you want when dead tired, is to wait for your luggage. Anything that can be used as a knife will be confiscated. Even nail clippers with the file. When in doubt, don't.



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 10:27 PM
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Originally posted by Gregarious
If you want more, send it in a box via mail, before you go. Use it, then mail it back.


This may be useful...The Poste Restante system



...In the United Kingdom, mail is addressed to POSTE RESTANTE (or TO BE CALLED FOR), which is written after the full name of the recipient (as appears on the identification to be presented ie. the passport, if abroad), then the name and full address of the destination post office, thus:—

Mr. John Smith
Poste Restante
Islington Post Office
116 Upper Street
Islington
London N1 1AE

If only addressed to a town name, for example POSTE RESTANTE, LONDON (there are currently 115 crown offices in LONDON[1]) mail will go to the closest main post office branch.

The sender should also include their return address. In the United Kingdom, the Royal Mail holds mail posted from within the UK for two weeks, whereas mail posted from abroad is normally held for one month, if the recipient is at sea however, it will be held for two months. Where mail is not collected within that time, it will be returned to the sender, or if there is no sender indicated, will be treated as undeliverable. If the sender would like uncollected mail returned sooner, they can indicate this on the envelope. Timescales vary from country to country according to local practice.

[edit] United States

In the United States, the US Postal Service uses the term general delivery and reserves the term poste restante for international mail sent to general delivery. Mail is addressed as follows:—

Mrs. Jane Q. Smith
General Delivery
Washington DC 20090-9999

In the ZIP+4 code, the add-on code for general delivery is 9999. The main post office in a community will hold such mail for up to 30 days. This may be a different post office from where oversized packages and registered mail are held for any particular zip code. Note that many post offices within a medium to large city do not have general delivery, and mail addressed to these zip codes will either be forwarded to the Main Post Office or returned to sender.



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 10:35 PM
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LOL. I'm currently overseas in Asia and have been for the past 5 months!
No BOB (that's back in blighty) but am carrying a bit of gold (1.5 ounces), first aid kit, gaffer tape, silk sleeping system.
Got my own motorbike so I don't have to rely on the public transport.

If SITX kicks off I've allies within range that, hopefully, will be in town. Most are in small towns (called cities here, but town sized and populated).

I've a month and a half left then its back home to merry england!



posted on Mar, 28 2009 @ 02:41 AM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


Now we're getting a little more warmed up. Sounds like you know your "abroad" area pretty well, almost a second home?

There's been some examples in the past. Boxing Day Tsunami, Yugoslavian civil war, Madagascar et. al. Here is an excellent eye-witness account of WTSHT Airport.

I'm not saying a holiday BOB is going to be of much use to you if freedom fighters overrun your airport but there may be a time when you might need to think about it. Say for example you're away and while you're gone martial law is declared in your home country, or the one you're in. Do you go crying to the embassy/consulate or calmy work the situation out (remember money is finite).



posted on Mar, 28 2009 @ 03:44 AM
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When we go on holiday in the UK we go by road and take a BOB with us, oddly enough we are going on a Bug Out Holiday this year I have booked a cottage in Somerset with 140 acres of shooting land, so we can get some SAA practice in.

When we go to America and when we travel anywhere from our friends house in America we FED EX our BOBS ahead of us, and put a micro kit in our hold luggage.



posted on Mar, 28 2009 @ 06:43 AM
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Originally posted by Nirgal
reply to post by WatchRider
 


Now we're getting a little more warmed up. Sounds like you know your "abroad" area pretty well, almost a second home?

There's been some examples in the past. Boxing Day Tsunami, Yugoslavian civil war, Madagascar et. al. Here is an excellent eye-witness account of WTSHT Airport.

I'm not saying a holiday BOB is going to be of much use to you if freedom fighters overrun your airport but there may be a time when you might need to think about it. Say for example you're away and while you're gone martial law is declared in your home country, or the one you're in. Do you go crying to the embassy/consulate or calmy work the situation out (remember money is finite).


Hahhah!

That airport 'siege' was a bit of a strange one TBH.

I was in bangkok at the time living in an apartment and hardly any of the locals I spoke to couldn't care less and basically shrugged their shoulders.
I wasn't taking chances and headed out of town by motorbike the following day on the off chance the military were deployed (they weren't as it turns out).
I had all my gear on my back with laptop strapped to the pillion seat.
Nothing came of the siege SITX wise in the end, although a fair few of us were wondering.
A few weeks later the airport was back in business and I mooched on back.

The only casualties were the sheeple tourists who hadn't allowed for disruptions. I saw foreigner after foreigner complain and whinge like the airport was there own personal vehicle. I really did question why people bring new-born kids out here in prams acting like the place is Neo-spain or Majorca. They did have a SITX in there zone.
A few foreigners including the one who filmed it actually went into the 'eye of the storm' to film and post it on youtube.
The police were ordered not to force them out though so it became an occupation of 'who is the more stubborn minded.'
The occupiers 'won' and the new PM they gunned for was elected. Job done.

But for me that was a dry-run, maybe practise for the real thing?

[edit on 28-3-2009 by WatchRider]



posted on Mar, 28 2009 @ 08:32 AM
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Honestly I would think if you have truly taken the concept of being prepared to heart you wont actually ever travel where you cannot be properly prepared because of retarded restrictions. I would not travel to states like Illinois because of their stance on firearms (specifically handguns) because then the defensive measures of my gear would be rendered useless and more of a legal hazard than situational bonus. Everywhere I travel a pack rides with me, I can sprint from my desk at work to the car and have it in my hands in less than 60 seconds. Every travel I plan has at its heart a set of rules I refuse to compromise on, and the integrity of my pack is one of the highest on that list.



posted on Mar, 28 2009 @ 08:38 AM
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The OP makes a very valid point about being out and about with out being prepared.


I think you can make as many preparations as possible but at sometime your guard will be down.

I feel it is nearly impossible to be 100% prepared where ever you are, ( I may be wrong ).



posted on Mar, 28 2009 @ 12:22 PM
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Originally posted by colec156

I feel it is nearly impossible to be 100% prepared where ever you are, ( I may be wrong ).



That depends on your definition of prepared. Do you think you need x lbs of gear?

Remember, knowledge weighs nothing. The real preparation is mental.

Think about what you'd do if you went outside in your boxers and had to bail right then. Bang, you have zero seconds to react and grab your bag. Or your house may be blown up in an airstrike or rpg attack (happened to my friend twice, he wasn't home, an Israeli missile took out his house)

The best way to be prepared is to just know "everything" at a level that's sufficient to ensure your survival. Know how to fix transportation devices, know how electricity and electronics work. Know how to use tools, know what to do with raw food when you find it. Know every detail of what's going on around you by absorbing all information available. Be ready to switch into logic mode and solve problems without being guided by irrational impulsive reactions or fear and panic. Know basic astronomy so the sky is familiar and can be a solid reference. Also know meteorology to a basic level. Why is the wind blowing? Is it gonna stop? Is it gonna rain? Know something about botany, mycology, geology, geography, cartography, and as many more ologies and ographies as you can cram inside 3lbs of grey mush. You'd be surprised how much your brain holds when you really try to fill it with useful stuff. Archaeology and anthropology are good fields, learn how man lived when he didn't have such things as the wheel, the laser, and electric lamplight.

Or think of it this way, your brain is your BOB. Put something incredibly useful in there. It took the space of a grain of sand on a beach. It has no mass, and it is ready RIGHT NOW. You're only limited by how much time you spend packing your bag. It's a lot more important to know stuff than to have stuff. I bet half the people with fancy techy gear filled packs don't have a clue as to how to use the gear it contains anyway.



posted on Mar, 29 2009 @ 07:44 AM
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I have noticed a distinct lack (with one exception) of North American contribution on this thread.

Now either I have written this in a foreign language and you're finding it difficult to read.

(Hint - Holiday is the same as vacation)

Or, you guys don't seem to realise that there are other countries.

Do you seriously never spend time away from your fort?



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