where in the circuit

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posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 05:36 PM
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where in the circuit does heart that has blood with oxygen on one junction, and blood without oxygen on the other junction, not sure which way it flows i guess blood with oxygen is bad bad, since it oxidizes, however all those ending points in the circuit like the finger and arms and stuff where do they send the either oxidized blood to nonoxidized, i guess its all because all internal blood is non oxidized or is that on specific veins?




posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 06:16 PM
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en.wikipedia.org...


The main components of the human circulatory system are the heart, the blood, and the blood vessels. The circulatory system includes: the pulmonary circulation, a "loop" through the lungs where blood is oxygenated; and the systemic circulation, a "loop" through the rest of the body to provide oxygenated blood.


There is kind of two circuit. Blood goes from the heart through the pulmonary circuit where it give back CO2 and gets O2 (oxygen). It then goes back to the heart and get pumped through the system. The cells get the oxygen and gives CO2 and the blood goes back to the heart to be pumped in the lungs. The process goes on.



posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 09:33 PM
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but what cycles it back through im not gonna sit there and be like well how much non oxidized blood needs to be transported from the heart to the lungs, but i always always told in school the heart does the conversion and routes the blood to the needed subnet, but how does the subnet reroute the packet back to the server since there is not two way communication



posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 09:53 PM
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Blood is a continually pumped liquid that moves via pressure form the heart through the arterial system and then back through the veins. There is no 'two-way communication' required since the pressure does not release at the cells. The blood never leaves the blood vessels.

Oxygen, nutrients, etc. are gathered through the process when the blood comes into contact with the pulmonary walls or the digestive walls. These are exchanged for waste products whenever the blood comes close enough to a cell that needs such a transfer. The waste products are then given off to the liver, kidneys, lower digestive system, and lungs when the blood comes close to them.

It sounds like you are thinking each blood cell gets some sort of target which it travels to and then has to make its way back to the heart for more instructions. It doesn't work that way; it's more of a 'get when you can, give when it's needed' set-up.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 10:51 PM
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reply to post by wtf2000
 
There are three types of blood vessels: arteries, veins, and capillaries.

Arterial blood is rich in oxygen and bright red from hemoglobin. As blood courses through the body to the brain, extremities, organs, etc. it gives up oxygen to the body's cells.

The arteries narrow in diameter as the distance from the heart increases, until they are millimeters thick or thinner.

At this point, blood has given up much of its oxygen and moves through thin vessels called capillaries.

Capillaries merge with veins and the veins carry the blood back to the heart and lungs. Venous blood is oxygen poor and begins the cycle again as it passes through the heart and lungs for re-oxygenation.

It is an endless loop.

jw



posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 11:04 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
Blood is a continually pumped liquid that moves via pressure form the heart through the arterial system and then back through the veins. There is no 'two-way communication' required since the pressure does not release at the cells. The blood never leaves the blood vessels.

Oxygen, nutrients, etc. are gathered through the process when the blood comes into contact with the pulmonary walls or the digestive walls. These are exchanged for waste products whenever the blood comes close enough to a cell that needs such a transfer. The waste products are then given off to the liver, kidneys, lower digestive system, and lungs when the blood comes close to them.

It sounds like you are thinking each blood cell gets some sort of target which it travels to and then has to make its way back to the heart for more instructions. It doesn't work that way; it's more of a 'get when you can, give when it's needed' set-up.

TheRedneck


you ever seen someone save a sinking ship, when its takeing water from each side and takes water from one side and dumps the water on the side and then repeats the same process because the vessel is still takeing on water, i guess what the intrusion might be is that someone wants to anihilate your subnet but identifying and authenticating the attack is the problem, its like never downplay a situation because thats like wrapping a tennis ball around a telephone poll.



posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 11:07 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by wtf2000
 


What the F are you blathering on about,
your last statments were gibberish



posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 11:32 PM
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Originally posted by wtf2000
but what cycles it back through im not gonna sit there and be like well how much non oxidized blood needs to be transported from the heart to the lungs, but i always always told in school the heart does the conversion and routes the blood to the needed subnet, but how does the subnet reroute the packet back to the server since there is not two way communication


The heart acts as a Multi Station Access Unit; each virtual chamber of the lungs is akin to the hosts connected to ring IN and ring OUT. Ring IN collects the token after the last host has received and discarded a carbon dioxide data packet from the host just before it. Once the MAU has the token, it sends it to the first host, which creates and sends an oxygen data packet down the ring. The next host collects the packet, copies part of it into memory, and replaces the data it copied with carbon dioxide data that was in memory from the last go around. The data packet now consists of mostly oxygen, and some carbon dioxide. The packet is sent down to the next host, which does the same - it increases the ratio of carbon dioxide data to the ratio of oxygen data within the packet. Once the packet arrives at the last host, it is almost completely carbon dioxide data. The last host then takes the data and discards it. It sends a token to the MAU, which in turn sends the token to the first host again and the process repeats.



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 12:00 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 03:09 AM
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lol...


I have no idea what's going on in this conversation, but I'm finding it hilariously amusing regardless.



As far as I can tell he's asking how blood returns to the heart to be pumped again... but I'm pretty sure nobody could be lacking badly enough in their comprehension of fluid dynamics to need to ask such a question.


So I'm at a loss to understand what he wants.

On one hand he's asking about the cardio-vascular system... but he's using network terminology.

Freaking hilarious.


One thing is for certain, his primary language probably isn't English.

[edit on 27-3-2009 by johnsky]



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 07:24 AM
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reply to post by johnsky

I'm not even sure his primary language is human...


Sounds like someone who is just getting a few laughs by posting garbage. Some people are easily amused.

TheRedneck





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