It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Heads up! - A virus that attacks computer at BIOS level.

page: 2
2
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 10:50 AM
link   
12m8keall2c is my computer god. With him around ... I shall walk through the valley of the shadow of computer virus and fear no evil.




posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 03:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by goldbomb444
I can tell you with absolute certainty that this is bunk. Having built my own 4 bit processor, thus having an intimate understanding of the workings of processors and memory, I can tell you that such a virus is impossible UNLESS it somehow destroys the chip at the hardware level (too much voltage to the chip for example.)


They're not talking about the processor or RAM/Cache, they're talking about the BIOS which is an operating system in itself.

I've built my own basic processor back in college as well.



As for the Mac lover on the other page, no, it doesn't matter what operating system you use, a bios (cmos) virus would infect macs just as easily.


But as some have mentioned, there has to be a way to get it onto the computer first. Either through the cmos on board other cards, or through traditional means.

Once it's on your computer though, oh boy, good luck.
Something like this would require you flashing everything... and I do mean, everything.



posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 03:21 PM
link   
I aways leave one computer of the internet, so i assume it is safe, but maybe not.

But this story just shows how stupid things are, and probably the government alredy do this, i feel like swearing alot, lol.



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 12:53 PM
link   
Hmmm. If you look at the picture of the researcher from the OP link you can see that he has milw0rm up on his computer. This contains a collection of known vulnerabilities and exploits. However, in the article, it says they can do this without any vulnerabilities.

That makes me wonder if they are saying it is POSSIBLE to do this without vulnerabilities, but they haven't eliminated them yet. Perhaps they guy was just persusing the site on his break. Who knows.

-Sanity's Last Day



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 12:54 PM
link   
Heads up! - A virus that attacks computer at BIOS level.

Yes, Windows Vista is a nasty virus indeed


This thing is a biiatch, it will survive any reinstalation of the operating system, infect ANY computer regardless of it running windows or Linux or any other OS.

It will not survive a DOD overwrite using kill disk.

[edit on 27-3-2009 by aLiiEn]



posted on Mar, 28 2009 @ 01:32 PM
link   
I forgot to mention something else that is relevant to this topic, the CIH Virus

en.wikipedia.org...

That was a virus about 10 years ago that attacked the bios. It was more just an attack than an infection, and as they say in the wiki page;

"payloads served to render the host computer inoperable, and for laymen the virus essentially destroyed the PC"

I remember this being considered a real threat at the time, although I think the damage wasn't as bad as expected. It requires the same level of access as the one the OP mentioned, root/physical, so since Windows XP, it's much less likely to be able to do the damage.



posted on Mar, 29 2009 @ 04:25 PM
link   
reply to post by Now_Then
 


I guess my question is
If there's a way to get it on the system, there's a way to get it off the system so how can it be detected and removed?



posted on Mar, 29 2009 @ 05:03 PM
link   
I'm kind of interested to see how a Gigabyte MB would hold up...

Gigabyte Technologies uses a Dual Bios. If one crashes, the other takes over and rebuilds the first one. I flashed my BIOS on my GB about 3 or 4 times before I figured out you have to essentially 'trick' the BIOS to get it to update... the original BIOS would overwrite the new flash because it only takes to one BIOS at a time. VERY stable boards! Right now I'm using an MSI micro ATX, which is OK, but I haven't really done much on this computer to crash the BIOS (not like I used to).

Lol... went to go get the link for the DualBIOS page and I think it answered my question!

--GIGABYTE--DUAL BIOS WEB

What if the BIOS Fails? Have you ever been in the middle of a BIOS update and then had it fail for some reason? Or how about executing some applications only to find out that you've been infected by some new virus that completely renders your BIOS inoperable? If this has ever happened to you, you know how difficult it can be to fix the problem. Without the BIOS working, the motherboard is basically not functional at all, since it is unable to boot. Often, the only way to get your system up and running again is to send your board in for an RMA so the BIOS chip can be physically replaced.



I miss my GB board... never EVER had a crash in the middle of a recording session!



posted on Mar, 29 2009 @ 05:05 PM
link   
Old---very old--news.
I remember one from '94 or'95 that could jack up all the voltages in the bios settings, literally frying your complete system on boot.
It is much harder now than it was then ,with checksum verification and processor level virus protection, but numerous paths of infections from plain old internet, to your mp3 player make it much easier for bugs to get in than it was in the early 90's.

I wouldn't be too concerned, as I am positive that millions of computers with parts made in China already have a killswitch or thief preinstalled, awaiting orders.



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 08:08 AM
link   
Here the site Hack a day seems to be offering a competion for people to write code for this sort of thing.

I'm still trying to wrap my head around the complexities of computers, so I may be reading this wrong.


We’re putting a bounty on two high-priority Bus Pirate features. You can get a free PCB for the upcoming Bus Pirate V2 by writing a bit of code. Hack a Day has a varied and talented group of readers, and we know someone out there has the experience to make these changes with minimal difficulty.

* The latest code integrates the PIC24F bootloader for easy updates without a programmer. We’d like to add a protocol snooper, but that requires interrupts. With the bootloader, however, interrupts are relocated and we’ve yet to fully grasp how that works. We’ll send a PCB and PIC 24F to the first person who modifies the code to demonstrate UART, SPI, or change notification interrupts with the boot loader. Microchip’s 24F bootloader app note is available here.


Any one want to shead a bit of light on that one?



posted on Mar, 31 2009 @ 07:09 PM
link   
I didn't read the whole tread but if this is what I think it is it's a rootkit that can exploit a vulnerabilty in all i386 (old and new) Intel chips, but in order to gain control the attacker would have to know exactely what chip your running to attack you.



posted on Mar, 31 2009 @ 07:40 PM
link   

Originally posted by prjct
say it with me...

Buy and use a Mac!


If I were you, I wouldn't tell too many people to get a Mac because the only reason Macs are relatively safe is because of their small market share. If that changes then they too will be targeted.

I for one don't fear any malware becau*#&$@@ NO CARRIER



posted on Mar, 31 2009 @ 08:24 PM
link   
I've already protected my system from it. It's really simple too, just get some solder and purchase a Rx-21C IC Chip Diodic generation 2 transcapacitor. All you have to do is rig your motherboard to supply an inverse reactive current for the unilateral phase detractors around the I/O terminals, which synchronizes any attempt by a virus attack by meta-polarizing input streams to the core of the BIOS - the virus electropotential signature is then phased down by a factor of 10.02x10^-56 (roughly) through the adaptive lattice filter. This causes problems on older hardware with a universally gaged impulse diversion occurs at any speed of under 10x23^-18 petaseconds, but there isn't much to worry about otherwise. I'm talking about chips so old that they wouldn't know what to do with an inverse polarity modulation of group-velocity electro-photonic guide waves if it hit them right in the active physical unit core, and that's really saying something, you know what I'm saying?

Basically, it's like a shield for any of the writable memory on your circuit cards. No bits can be input into logic junctions when this inverted current is applied to the domain register of the core logic unit.



posted on Mar, 31 2009 @ 08:34 PM
link   

Originally posted by Now_Then
Here the site Hack a day seems to be offering a competion for people to write code for this sort of thing.

I'm still trying to wrap my head around the complexities of computers, so I may be reading this wrong.


We’re putting a bounty on two high-priority Bus Pirate features. You can get a free PCB for the upcoming Bus Pirate V2 by writing a bit of code. Hack a Day has a varied and talented group of readers, and we know someone out there has the experience to make these changes with minimal difficulty.

* The latest code integrates the PIC24F bootloader for easy updates without a programmer. We’d like to add a protocol snooper, but that requires interrupts. With the bootloader, however, interrupts are relocated and we’ve yet to fully grasp how that works. We’ll send a PCB and PIC 24F to the first person who modifies the code to demonstrate UART, SPI, or change notification interrupts with the boot loader. Microchip’s 24F bootloader app note is available here.


Any one want to shead a bit of light on that one?


They basically want someone to create an interrupt (which are reserved "numbers" in order of importance to the cpu, to have it interrupt what it's doing so it can communicate with a certain devices. The system timer is 0 as the most important) sniffer so they can look at the processes which happens at boot up, when the boot loader loads data from some memory source into system memory... because a CPU can't do that. They'll send a Printed Circuit Board and some type of programmable interrupt controller to whoever can demonstrate the ability.



posted on Mar, 31 2009 @ 10:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by JohnHolmes

Originally posted by Solomons
Cant you just clear your cmos?

[edit on 25-3-2009 by Solomons]


I'm not sure but I don't think so. If they can put the code into the flash memory of a pci card, it would be loaded on every reboot. I always thought my cmos was safe cause it's password protected. It doesn't look that way anymore.

The good news is that it's not easy to install.


Theoretically, you could clear CMOS if viral code was infecting a volatile block. Changing 1 setting and resaving CMOS. I've never heard of CMOS virus. Although there is plenty of free space in CMOS's to contain a virus.

On the other hand, PCI card based viruses have been around for about a decade. They aren't very prolific since it's a very advanced technique of either writing to a block of video RAM which can remain through a warm boot or a shortened cold boot. One reason techs suggest count 30 seconds as it allows those tiny battery-like components called capacitors to discharge. Or a virus might opt to manipulate video firmware and install itself there, thus, requiring you to re-flash the cards firmware. Very rare.
Video RAM infection is far easier for viral code.

Writing into the BIOS of any device... PCI and even HDD firmware could be achieved. Most viral programmers aren't that clever or resourceful or they just don't have the desire unless it's in their job description; and the 'script-kiddie' level L337 hax0rz create mayhem in a superficial way.

My point being that viruses that operate at low level have always been extremely rare but can be devastatingly small and intelligent.

A local professional would have the best solution were your computer to get that severe of a virus.

As for using a magnet on top of any chip or mother board... If you have an expendable TV, run a magnet close to the screen and watch the electrons gravitate... It's like Rainbows of Obama without the unicorns though...

That's what it will do with flowing electrons inside the circuits or media that you run a magnet over... a CRT/TV will just make it visible.

Here's best hopes that low level viruses stay away from ATS'ers



posted on Apr, 8 2009 @ 05:34 AM
link   

Originally posted by Now_Then
Any one want to shead a bit of light on that one?



Originally posted by logician magician
They basically want someone to create an interrupt (which are reserved "numbers" in order of importance to the cpu, to have it interrupt what it's doing so it can communicate with a certain devices. The system timer is 0 as the most important) sniffer so they can look at the processes which happens at boot up, when the boot loader loads data from some memory source into system memory... because a CPU can't do that. They'll send a Printed Circuit Board and some type of programmable interrupt controller to whoever can demonstrate the ability.


I didn't even look at the link but that has nothing to do with PC's, they're talking about PIC Microcontrollers



new topics

top topics



 
2
<< 1   >>

log in

join