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Dreams... Help

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posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 02:53 AM
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As I have gotten older, it seems that I remember less and less of my dreams. It has actually gotten to the point that I cannot remember the last time I had a dream and remembered anything that happened in it. This is new for me, since I remember having fairly vivid dreams not long ago.

Does anyone have opinions on why this is? There are obviously a few different ways to approach it. Is it something chemical/biological, or is it something deeper?




posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 08:23 PM
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It might be (not sure on your age) that you have a more "grown up" life with a job, mortgage, kids... you know all that fun stuff. Your brain might be so overwhelmed with it all and it might be hard to recall/remember your dreams. Just a thought.

Every night before I go to bed I look into the mirror and say "Fish you are going to have good dreams tonight and you WILL remember them." It has helped me greatly and I have trained myself to remember my dreams. I can usually remember three separate dreams nightly for five nights a week.


Happy Dreaming.



posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 07:16 PM
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Here's a slightly inconvenient way to remember your dreams.
1. Get one pen or pencil
2. Get a notebook or scrap-paper
3. Get an alarm clock, and set it for 4:30 am or any inconvenient time.
4. Bed, and pillow

When you full asleep and drop into a deep slumber, you will then be awoken by your alarm clock. The secret is don't turn over and go back to sleep. Instead write down all that you can remember about your dream. You will have a pen or pencil set aside with some paper. If you do this for 4-7 days will remember more and...more. Then you'll start to realize you dream more then one dream in one night.

or

Just get up in the morning, any usual time without the alarm clock. And write down what you think you remembered. This process takes practice, the more you try to remember over time the more you recall your dreams. Its like opening the door to your subconscious



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 12:05 AM
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reply to post by WhatsThat
 


Okay. So basically, I should try waking up earlier than usual through the means of an alarm clock (seems like a fairly decent idea). I will try that and I will get back to you.

I am a bit of an insomniac also, could that play a part also? I don't have a good sleep cycle.



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 12:25 AM
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Originally posted by Irish M1ck
I am a bit of an insomniac also, could that play a part also? I don't have a good sleep cycle.


The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


I'm in the same situation as you. I can't remember my dreams either. Just like you, I really don't remember even dreaming. I know I dream. I don't remember them but, yet I do know that I'm dreaming something.

Again, I also am an insomniac. I don't sleep easily. I don't sleep well and I don't really sleep much at all. I can probably attribute this to too much coffee and too much mental stimulation. Nevertheless, I'm cool with it. It doesn't really bother me but I do miss the dreams!

At one time, I used to have very vivid dreams. And, as has been suggested, I used to record them. I had the pencil and pad on my night stand and I would write down the poignant details of my dreams the moment I awoke. It wasn't easy to do this. It took practice. However, it was a very interesting personal experiment. I could see some very interesting patterns in my life. To give you an example, during a very chaotic period of about two weeks, I had a lot of dreams where I was always driving too fast or running behind schedule. I couldn't keep up. My dreams reflected that period of my life fairly accurately.

I did some other personal explorations of dreaming: i.e., lucid dreaming. But, as I said, it takes practice and it also takes some perseverance. At some point I simply stopped noting my dreams and, eventually I came to the place where I am now -- an insomniac who is entirely out of touch with the dream world.

If I were to try to regain some sort of real balance between my wakeful and sleep state, I would probably begin by regaining some control over my sleep regimen. You know, shooting for that elusive eight to ten hours per night. After that, after I finally restored some semblance of healthy sleep, I'd start worrying about dreaming and in remembering them. A good schedule and good sleep hygiene is, in my opinion, is the key. But I think that this is easier said than done.



As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 01:05 AM
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reply to post by benevolent tyrant
 


Wow. Thanks for the story. Glad to see someone else in my position. I have never recorded them, but I really would like to get a grip on what exactly I am dreaming about (I really feel like it is great insight in my subconscious). Unfortunately, I have no idea what I dream about. If you were to talk to me the second I woke up and I couldn't tell you - alarm clock or not.

I am going to try to work on it, but I am not sure I can help it at all. I'll see what I can do this weekend.

[edit on 3/27/2009 by Irish M1ck]



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 02:16 AM
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Originally posted by Irish M1ck

I am going to try to work on it, but I am not sure I can help it at all. I'll see what I can do this weekend.

[edit on 3/27/2009 by Irish M1ck]


The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


This one weekend is probably a good start. After all, one does have to start somewhere...some time. Of course, I don't really know for certain, I'm not a sleep expert but I would hazard some guesses. If you are an insomniac or if you have had trouble sleeping for quite some time, you have probably established some poor sleep habits. It will probably take you longer than a weekend before you could possibly achieve any positive results. In my opinion, it simply stands to reason that it is vital for insomniacs or those with poor sleep hygiene to make some fundamental changes before one might possibly start to dream, much less record them.

Off of the top of my ., I would imagine that there are a few basic issues that probably should be examined before one might really get a handle on sleep and dreaming.

-go to bed at the same time each night
-reduce or eliminate substances that might interfere with natural sleep: coffee, tea, cola and other beverages containing caffeine, chocolate and other stimulants.
-make sure that you have had a good basic amount of physical exercise in the day (but not too close to bedtime).
-try to quiet your mind through meditation and "mindfullness"
-be diligent in promoting good sleep routines.

I don't think that attempting to dream, much less to record them would be very fruitful until, as previously mentioned in this thread, a good sleep regimen is introduced, maintained and incorporated into one's life.

Of course, I'm one to talk and give advice..... it's 3:15 am!



As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 01:21 PM
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Actually it took me forever to fall asleep last night, I think I got to bed around 4:30 am, go figure!
However, I kept waking up and by the time I was fully awake I realized I had the strangest short term dream. The dream itself didn't make any sense. But I think I understood the theme of it.
I guess one doesn't have to have a full night of sleep to dream. You can set aside an hour and a half in the day to sleep. Think of it as a nap. Yes, you might think I'm a slacker who naps in the daytime but anytime is a good time to get some shut eye; when your day is free of course....no pressure, just sleep



posted on Mar, 27 2009 @ 02:10 PM
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Try taking B6. I read about it years ago for dreams, bought some and my family took it. About 3 days later my teenage daughter told her dad she had been having a bunch of dreams. He said he had too. I laughed sooo hard. They didn't know the side effect. It took a little longer to work for me.

I also write my dreams down in a book as soon as I wake up even if it is in the middle of the night. After a while, your subconscious gets it that you are serious and you will remember most dreams easily. Good habit to get into because dreams can reveal so much to us.




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