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Oakland Police Massacre Casts Ugly Glare on Ex-Felon Desperation

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posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 07:10 AM
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Oakland Police Massacre Casts Ugly Glare on Ex-Felon Desperation


www.opednews.com

A general consensus is that it was a deadly mix of panic, rage, and frustration that caused Lovelle Mixon to snap. His shocking murderous rampage left 4 Oakland police officers dead and a city...

...And others like him are ticking time bombs that endanger themselves and others. Oakland tragically showed that.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 07:10 AM
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Judging from the horrific magnitude of one desperate felon's murder spree, this article touches on an underlying issue in American society that goes largely undiscussed; the dismal prospects and lives of people who have marginalized themselves through criminal acts.

Mixon was free on parole, and stopped going to his scheduled parole meetings. A warrant was issued for his arrest for these violations. Don't you think he knew darn well what the consequences would be, should he come into police contact?

Of course he did! It seems as though he made a choice not to go quietly if confronted by police, knowing he would be taken straight to jail. Again.

What was Mixon's problem about not conforming to the conditions of his parole? Self-pity? Rebellion against authority?

Why couldn't he find a job? Was he lazy? Or truly discriminated against, in his attempts to gain employment?

How do we know the number of job applications he filled-out? Should records be kept of things like this?

What can be done about violent offenders, living in our communities, who think they have much less to live for, and are willing to vent their anger on innocent people?

Should they be legally required to register as 'violent offenders' similar to 'sex-offender' laws?

Should job applications be more or less restrictive about past history disclosure?

How do we take the lesson of this tragedy, and create new ways of successfully re-acclimating recently released cons back into society, in the hopes of seeing them change into productive, self-supporting citizens?

Or do we allow our own personal anger and resentment against this type of individual to further intensify an already growing trend of disdain & discrimination against cons?

www.opednews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 07:29 AM
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www.latimes.com...
There is the history of events leading up to this.
He was going ok for a while by the looks of it.
Possibly drugs sent him off the rails again.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 07:35 AM
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I don't think that 4 cops who die while doing their job would necessarily qualify as a "massacre". Sensationalist headlines like this seem to be used to drive an agenda.

We are living in some dark times right now. The police have a difficult job to do but they haven't exactly helped their own cause. They no longer "serve and protect", they now seem more likely to "intimidate and oppress." Eventually people are going to snap and things like this are going to happen.

As more people end up in dire straits, I expect to see a lot more of this in the news. Many people are going to be left with nothing to lose.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 09:03 AM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 10:58 AM
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So people are surprised that convicted felons are behaving like....

Convicted felons?

Is this article serious? The dismal prospects of people who have marginalised themselves through CRIME?

Well who's friggin' fault is that I wonder? Is the recession making them rob, assault, rape and kill people?

Are the Wall Street bankers holding guns to their heads telling them to go out and harm innocent people?

This article is garbage:


There are tens of thousands like him on America’s streets.In 2007, the National Institute of Justice found that 60 percent of ex-felon offenders remain unemployed a year after their release.


Right.

Because ex-felons make some very dependable, trustworthy and well-motivated employees for any potential employer?

Yes let's give our sympathies to people who wind up in jail after breaking the law and then lament at their inability to find a stable job after being released.

Released/Ex-Felon doesn't = "Born Again good Samaritan"

Which is why a good proportion of people (40% or so) who enter the United States correctional system, wind up back there at some in the future.

Instead of keeping them there we have to try and pawn them off onto government sponsored "reform programs", which are nothing more that political bargaining chips that make the government look effective and compassionate at the same time when dealing with crime, all the while the crime rate steadily increases.

[edit on 24/3/09 by The Godfather of Conspira]



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 11:15 AM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by FRIGHTENER
 



Don't you think he knew darn well what the consequences would be, should he come into police contact?


More than likely. But probably didn't care.


Of course he did! It seems as though he made a choice not to go quietly if confronted by police, knowing he would be taken straight to jail. Again.


And thus a horrible shooting spree erupted. Killing 4 officers and this ex con.


What was Mixon's problem about not conforming to the conditions of his parole? Self-pity? Rebellion against authority?


Most likely he got involved with the same people that he was with before and he started sliping into bad habbits once again.


Why couldn't he find a job? Was he lazy? Or truly discriminated against, in his attempts to gain employment?


Or there were no jobs to be had, remember this is a deep recession we are in.


How do we know the number of job applications he filled-out? Should records be kept of things like this?


Typically they are. And he had to keep track of applications he submited to companies and turn those records over to his PO


What can be done about violent offenders, living in our communities, who think they have much less to live for, and are willing to vent their anger on innocent people?


Or maybe instead of incarceration we could try rehabilitation.


Should they be legally required to register as 'violent offenders' similar to 'sex-offender' laws?


No.


Should job applications be more or less restrictive about past history disclosure?


Depends on the job. A job at McDs for example shouldnt be restrictive, however a job at a federal airport or sea port should.


How do we take the lesson of this tragedy, and create new ways of successfully re-acclimating recently released cons back into society, in the hopes of seeing them change into productive, self-supporting citizens?


Education, education, education. Cons should be forced to work towards a degree of some sort as a part of their imprisonment.


Or do we allow our own personal anger and resentment against this type of individual to further intensify an already growing trend of disdain & discrimination against cons?


Or we could educate people. People that are educated are less likely to comit crime in the first place. When a person has viable options they can become decent members of society. If a person feels they have no hope or options they become criminals.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 11:31 AM
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Originally posted by The Godfather of Conspira

There are tens of thousands like him on America’s streets.In 2007, the National Institute of Justice found that 60 percent of ex-felon offenders remain unemployed a year after their release.


Right.

Because ex-felons make some very dependable, trustworthy and well-motivated employees for any potential employer?


So as a result of committing a crime, or more accurately being caught, one should be sent to prison to pay for that crime. Then as further "payment", generalizing your statement, be marginalized as unreliable, untrustworthy and unmotivated and denied employment on that basis. Then what?

No job = No money = No way to maintain life in our current system. Do you really need to hold a gun to someone's head or just make them desperate?

Is it that you wish to continue feeding the prison machine-system?

I always thought the purpose of prison was not only as punishment but as atonement. So that when someone is released from prison they are accepted as being a potentially productive member of society, allowed to reintegrate and live a relatively normal life. I don't think that seems unreasonable.

If this isn't working, then what's really the problem?

Is it that people are just naturally born wrong? How do we solve this issue then?

Or could it be that the system is a self-perpetuating fallacy? A solution for this is much less costly to human life and dignity, I believe.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by TravelerintheDark
 



So as a result of committing a crime, or more accurately being caught, one should be sent to prison to pay for that crime.


What would you rather? A slap on the wrist?


Forgive me I didn't realise the notion of justice was that far-removed from America as of yet.

I stand "corrected". As I do with the supposed assumption that if you can get away with something you deserve your freedom.

Did I step into a parallel dimension where good is bad?


Then as further "payment", generalizing your statement, be marginalized as unreliable, untrustworthy and unmotivated and denied employment on that basis. Then what?


A nicely sugar-coated term for people who are repeat offenders, show no willingless to reform their criminal ways and then after release 1/3 of them end up back where they started.

Bit like saying 50% of Americans aren't fat, merely "well-rounded".

"Derogatory labelling" is the least repeat offenders who are habitually repeating their mistakes and breaking the law deserve.


No job = No money = No way to maintain life in our current system. Do you really need to hold a gun to someone's head or just make them desperate?


So No Money=Anarchy?

Bad economic situation=Right to evade the law and harm other people?

Are you kidding me?


I always thought the purpose of prison was not only as punishment but as atonement. So that when someone is released from prison they are accepted as being a potentially productive member of society, allowed to reintegrate and live a relatively normal life. I don't think that seems unreasonable.


Certainly not. That should be what prisons are used for, I agree.

The sky-rocketing incarceration rate suggests otherwise however and I'll be the first to say America is leading the world in locking up innocent people who don't deserve to be there and are merely products of their environment.

That said, if you want freedom, prove it.
Prove you're willing to lead a NORMAL life.

Don't end up in jail 6 months after bsing your way through a Parole Hearing.

Crooks are far more cunning than you give them credit for buddy.


Is it that people are just naturally born wrong? How do we solve this issue then?

Or could it be that the system is a self-perpetuating fallacy? A solution for this is much less costly to human life and dignity, I believe.


That's beyond the both of us and a separate issue entirely.

What any partial individual can agree on however, is that just because America is in a state of economic ruin, does not given ANYONE the right to go out and perpetuate crimes because they fear they may not be able to sustain themselves anymore.

That's just "Jungle Law".

Fair enough, the habitat we live in is bad. Do we need to adapt to the atmosphere of helplessness and unbridled thirst for vengeance at our government's incompetence and apply that to our ordinary lives?

Does any animal in the world adapt to pain and suffering? Or fire and brimstone?

Be realistic here.

The judge of America's adherence to it's constitutionally guaranteed freedoms is not measured by how many people are being arrested anyway.

Rather it's how the majority of the populace pull through tough times and still stick by it's laws and regulations, instead of giving into primal human instincts.

America's been through far worse crises and never faced anything close to all-out anarchy.


[edit on 24/3/09 by The Godfather of Conspira]



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 12:03 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by andy1033
 


yes all cops are murderous thugs that every night on patroll go out and start slaughtering thousands upon thousands of people in a vicious bloodbath.

RIIIIIIGGGHHT.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 12:12 PM
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Originally posted by whatukno
reply to post by andy1033
 


yes all cops are murderous thugs that every night on patroll go out and start slaughtering thousands upon thousands of people in a vicious bloodbath.

RIIIIIIGGGHHT.


Silent weapons for silent wars. If you have seen what they did to me, organising there haressment of me, for nearly 17 years now. There are more ways to kill people than just the police killing them straight out.

Think for yourself for a change.

Non lethel weapons must of been a god send for the serial killers that join the police, they must love what they do to people so much.

Even though the police have never found that i have commited any crime, they have never stopped there organised haressment of me period. You live in a dream world if you want, but i am going to tell it straight. Police are murderers period and my life proved it. Plus do not say its a few bad apples, what a load of tosh that saying is, 99% of them would like to kill anyone they want, and like i say there are more ways to kill people than just killing them straight out.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by andy1033
 



Police are all serial killers, and there are bound to be so many cases of murder by the police. Very sick people join the police to get there wish of murder and running vendettas.


There's outrage at injustice and corruption.

And then there's tinfoil-based paranoia and delusional ranting.

Discern between the two. Some Police are very corrupt indeed, we all know that, this is a conspiracy website after all.


"Serial killers" and other such sensationalist adjectives only serve to discredit you, and not the Police or the powers to be.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 01:00 PM
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REPY TO: The Godfather of Conspiria

We obviously agree on some points. There is a awful lot of unfairness in the incarceration process, and some people are products of terrible environments. Which goes to the heart of my point in that we shouldn't further the unfairness of the system by exacting prejudice on those previously incarcerated. When talking about repeat offenders, the question to me is how many of them offend repeatedly because it is in their inherent nature and how many do so as a result of prejudices inside and outside the system?

I don't think the issue is beyond you and I. In fact, I think that the idea of the issue being beyond you and I is one of the core issues we face in coming years. For too long we've been told these things are beyond us by standards ranging from education to social status. And so we elect people who should have a firmer grasp? I don't think that has worked out very well.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 01:30 PM
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The system is ridiculous on what it expects on the people within it. A number of my friends have had legal troubles in the past and it has become just a cycle of going in and out of jail because it's impossible to meet parole or probation expectations for many lower-middle class people. For instance my friend who I've grown up with since we were kids and never committed a violent or criminal act in his life has been in the system for three years for being caught with a gram of weed and one ecstasy pill. He's having extreme issues keeping up with all the payments and lawyer fees. He's just barely scrapping by with two jobs. And he's in one of the best positions. Really the system is just all about money and how much they can # out of you once you're unlucky enough to get put into. I think a lot of Americans are in complete denial or are afraid because I come from a white middle class background in a non-violent neighborhood and the legal system done nothing but hurt my community and the people in it.

Don't get me wrong I'm in favor of police and I'm not advocating anything against the justice system. I'm just saying the legal system in this country is completely counter-productive and breeds a culture of desperation and criminality.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 04:37 PM
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reply to post by BorgHoffen
 

Excellent link Borg, Star!

I was interested in Mixon's parole info, and timeline leading up to the warrant issued for his arrest. What are you, a mind reader?


Drugs possible. Also, failure to find gainful employment is usually a condition.

Since he got quite a taste of prison life, he musta been in the mindset of 'rather die, than go back', huh?



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by Karlhungis
 

Real good post Karl, as usual.

More & more people see the police that way, and I think you're right; add the increasingly difficult financial frustrations to more people in legal scrapes that require so many mandatory conditions, and UH-OHHH...

Could get real bad.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 05:05 PM
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Originally posted by The Godfather of Conspira

This article is garbage:...Because ex-felons make some very dependable, trustworthy and well-motivated employees for any potential employer?...Released/Ex-Felon doesn't = "Born Again good Samaritan"...Instead of keeping them there..."reform programs",

Thanks for a good post Godfather, Star!

I certainly agree with most of your point, in regards to a person like Mixon, who already exhibited violent, threatening, armed, criminal behavior in the past. There should have been something more restrictive put in place in his case!

I'm fairly certain if he had murdered innocent civillians, instead of police officers, those people's families would be considering sueing the city and parole/dept. of corrections...but do you think the police officer's families will be thinking along those lines? I don't know, I'm asking.

As far as employment for felons, I'd have to delve a little deeper here, and suggest that not all felony convictions on a person's record are as damning as Mixon's.

I know for a fact, some upper-echelon executives have kept their jobs after drug or DUI felonies...But I know this is a vast discussion, I don't mean to belittle your argument. You know what I'm getting at.

I also know that for some guys, spending time in the joint really puts the zap on their head, and will do anything it takes to avoid it ever again. These types make excellent, dependable workers. More motivated than regular Joes, sometimes!

I don't blame you for your position. But perhaps you could consider what I offer in some cases, where a man is doing & saying & working really hard, after getting out.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by whatukno
 

Really, really great post, whatukno, thanks; STAR!

AGREED 100%!


Nice distinction, about which placements for employment are available, and which ones should be restricted. What about casino card dealing? just kiddin.

Yeah, education would be an excellent path, but I think the cost of living (and school for that matter) are obstacles to quality time that could be spent persuing such.

Glad to have you on board with the discussion of this serious societal issue.
It affects us all. I'll keep my thinking cap on, for more.



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