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Could All The Plane Accidents Be Related To Solar Storms?

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posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 09:56 PM
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I have no evidence to support this fact other than my own thoughts and musings.

So, Could all the Plane accidents be related to Solar Storms?
The effect of Solar Storms on our planet is still not fully understood, but it is mainly thought that they mess with electronics.
The effects on wild life is thought to be more reaching. I have read that Solar Storms might be the cause of the missing bees and changes in bird behavior.
I also read somewhere that Solar Storms can effect our weather patterns.

It's kind of like how I get these lovely headaches when it's a full moon.
Is it possible that Solar Storms mess with our bodies and cause humans and other animals to act/feel differently?

Here's an example if youre having a little trouble following my train of thought:
A Pilot of a commercial plane is getting ready for a routine flight. He checks all his gauges and proceeds to the run way. During take off a pack of geese fly in front of his plane, getting sucked into the turbines and causing the plane to crash shortly thereafter. After the investigation into the crash it is found that these geese were extremely off their normal route for migration.

Okay another example:
Same beginning, except the geese are not there. The plane takes off and starts its journey. Half way through the trip the winds suddenly change for the worst. Wind sheer is 50-60 mph. One particularly hard gust causes the plane to veer hard to the right, ending in a crash. After the investigation, investigators can not find a reason for the sudden wind sheer. Weather was supposed to be mild in that area.

Catch my drift?




posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 10:05 PM
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Originally posted by Tentickles
A Pilot of a commercial plane is getting ready for a routine flight. He checks all his gauges and proceeds to the run way. During take off a pack of geese fly in front of his plane, getting sucked into the turbines and causing the plane to crash shortly thereafter. After the investigation into the crash it is found that these geese were extremely off their normal route for migration.


The number of bird strikes in a year is huge. In 2007, between the USAF and civil aviation, there were 12,600 reported bird strikes (with only 20% of civil aviation strikes reported, and approximately 5% of general aviation reported). That's without anything affecting where they fly. Bird strikes have been a hazard since the first flights took place.


Okay another example:
Same beginning, except the geese are not there. The plane takes off and starts its journey. Half way through the trip the winds suddenly change for the worst. Wind sheer is 50-60 mph. One particularly hard gust causes the plane to veer hard to the right, ending in a crash. After the investigation, investigators can not find a reason for the sudden wind sheer. Weather was supposed to be mild in that area.

Catch my drift?


Wind shear in level flight is very very rarely dangerous enough to cause a crash. The pilots usually have enough altitude to recover from it.

A more dangerous problem would be if we were hit by a solar storm strong enough to affect the planes electronics. But even then there are backups that would keep working. About the only time you would probably see something like this causing a plane crash is at low altitude on take off and landing.



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 10:24 PM
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I only know about the one in Japan.
It looked like the wind forced his nose down to fast and hard.
And he bounced and then tried to recover but it was to late.
But really it could have been many things, we will have to wait for the official report.
But I don't think that one was related at all to solar storms.



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 10:34 PM
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You know just throwing my thoughts out there, dont have to be right or wrong just musing.

You have to admit though plane crashes seem to be on the rise.



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 10:51 PM
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reply to post by Tentickles
 


From 1954 to 1980, the number of aircraft revenue departures per year in the US went from just over 3,002,576 to 5,352,927 . From 1981 to 2007, it went from just over 5,211,867 , to over 11,361,283. That's a huge jump. With that many more planes in the air, it's going to seem that there are that many more crashes. A lot of the crashes are General Aviation. There has always been a MUCH higher accident rate in General Aviation than commercial aviation.

Commercial aviation in the US actually went two years without a passenger fatality.



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 10:57 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Ah cool thank you for that information.
Have any information on how old most of the planes in the air are?



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 11:13 PM
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Bird strikes sounds plausible but I have a sneaking suspicion that there's a lot of safety check/maintenance skimping going on too. There always has been. Even more so with budget airliners and now with the economic crisis, I'd imagine that's compounding these issues.

IRM



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 11:13 PM
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reply to post by Tentickles
 


Depends entirely on the airline.

As of 4th quarter 2007 your major US carriers were at:

American - 14.7
Continental - 10.1
Delta - 13.8
Northwest - 18.5
Southwest - 9.8
United - 12.7
USAirways - 12.2

That's changed some as airlines are adding new aircraft to their fleets. The newer aircraft are more efficient, which means more money saved in fuel costs.



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 02:10 AM
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reply to post by InfaRedMan
 


Im sure that's going on too.

Just think if an airplane was skimped on maintenance then solar winds caused already iffy electronics to mess up...



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