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Dog Walker meets ET Converses about Crop Circles

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posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 09:55 PM
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Dog walker met UFO 'alien' with Scandinavian accent
A dog walker claimed she met a man from another planet who said aliens were responsible for crop circles, military UFO files have revealed.

www.telegraph.co.uk...


Hmmmm

Too bad she didn't have a digital video recorder hanging from her neck.




posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 11:09 PM
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Sounds like she ran into the same bunch of dudes that have been scamming Meier all these years. Either that or she has the same mental issues as him.

IRM



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 11:56 PM
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reply to post by InfaRedMan
 


I think it would be more intelligent to meet this with skepticism and an open mind rather than calling the lady crazy. All she said was that right after this encounter she saw a UFO and reported it.

Unless you're qualified to do mental analyses on a person you've never met or evaluated I would reserve such judgements.



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 12:01 AM
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Sounds like a typical disinformation scenario setup by the government to produce crazy stories, making a smoke screen for the real events going on. Although the orange sphere part is strange, wonder if it disapeared instantly or flew off in a random direction.



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 12:37 AM
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Thats some great stuff ! (whatever the deal is) reminds me of the great cases in the John Keel books and Jacque Valle books. Those are some good stories!



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 12:50 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


The bunk is pretty obvious to those who wish to view the information honestly.

"Alien with Scandinavian accent" says it all to me. I'm just calling it for how I see it.

IRM

[edit on 23/3/09 by InfaRedMan]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 12:51 AM
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What's with the attitude? Isn't this a discussion board where people discuss things?



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 12:57 AM
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This is rather strange. I don't think that we should say that this lady is crazy, thats not nice and we have absolutely zero evidence about that. Scandinavian aliens would really be something, arnt the Knights Templar rumored to have head up there after they got beat by the Vatican, maybe they had some communications with the aliens. Who knows...



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 12:59 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


Unless you're personally hired to defend the woman, then I would suggest you started with the attitude against my post. I can easily square the same argument at you. How can you say she's not crazy unless you know her personally or have studied psychology? ... Anyway, it's a moot point.

Probability suggests it's just another attention seeker with a story to tell... albeit a really bad one.

IRM



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 01:04 AM
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what an awesome story. i read this the other day after the Gov. released these files. Sounds genuine to me although its just a gut feeling.

there were a few creepy stories like this from the UK in the 80's.

nice post s&f

G



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 01:20 AM
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I asked a mod to shut this down because it came from the material discussed in another thread about the recent UK disclosure, which does grant it an "official" patina, however some might also point out that any govt. related disclosure could be factually tainted.

I'm guessing this is real, meaning it's a true story but not provable to any who would like to discount it because that is their wont to do as debunkers. However we might have an interesting discussion about the implications of what was disclosed, that ET is responsible for the crop circles, which many have concluded already.

If you wanna keep it open, discuss away and maybe skyfloating will see this and leave it.



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 01:20 AM
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reply to post by RUFFREADY
 

Jacque Valle books are amazing! I think the majority of people would call a farmer crazy if normal looking men in tight black suits in a flying saucer came down from the skys and asked for water, and in return, gave the farmer ricecakes. Yet there are hundreds of plain absurd stories from honest and good men and women since the early 1900s. Makes you wonder what's orchestrated and what may be real. It only takes less than half of people to not believe in something to make it false it seems. Unfortunatly for this lady, I don't think she gives a strong case, but how could she?



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by Sikmike620
 


exactly, what you said!

John Keel said the more you delve into the UFO subject the crazier its gets. It drives some deep investagaters to the brink of madness. Be carefull he said.

I believe that most of Keels' and Valles' books are now available by reprints..all interested folks should read 'em

its full of really good accounts of high strangeness

[edit on 23-3-2009 by RUFFREADY]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:45 PM
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The telephone operators account of the conversation is;

DEFE 24-1938 pdf at the national archives

The relevant page is bookmarked in the file itself, the conversation took place on the 21st November 1989, according to the text the call lasted about an hour, and the operator mentions in the text s/he is convinced of the sincerity of the caller.

I wouldn't discount an actress reading a line prepared by someone versed in the literature (ie. the Adamski humanoids);

"..fair hair with a Scandinavian type accent and dressed in a light brown garment similar to a flying suit.."

Its a bit adamski ish firstly, but would a regular person in the late 80s really know what a scandanavian accent sounds like? Would they then use a phrase which is by and large seen in the ufo field? Instead of "he sounded a bit odd", "his accent wasn't local" etc?



Theres some finnish people speaking here, without knowing they are scandanavian I personally would have no idea what the accent was and would likely say anything, would a likely equivalent non informed person in that decade stumble across a phrase and line so used in the ufology field by chance?

Edit: I was thinking along the govt intel route, but in some of Timothy Goods books I remember him writing about colluding with other UK ufologists in the past "fishing" RAF bases for telephone numbers (again why not phone the police) and further details of a presumed heirachy dealing with the phenomenae.

[edit on 23-3-2009 by stringue]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 08:27 PM
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Originally posted by stringue




Its a bit adamski ish firstly, but would a regular person in the late 80s really know what a scandanavian accent sounds like? Would they then use a phrase which is by and large seen in the ufo field? Instead of "he sounded a bit odd", "his accent wasn't local" etc?



A regular person in the late 80's?? I would assume any European of any age in any decade would be familiar with what a Scandanavian accent sounded like. This doesn't make sense to me. If this regular person was unfamiliar with ufology, which is more likely than not being familiar with what scandanavians sound like when they speak, it makes sense that she would make that observation.



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 01:26 PM
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Haven't had a good contactee story lately. I wonder if there was any mention of us humans doing harmful things to the environment. That used to be a common theme.

Anyway, since I wasn't there, and there's no other evidence, I can't really debunk it. I don't know what the real truth of it was.

Aliens? Can't say. Hoax? Sure, why not? Value of the report? Hovering right around zero.



posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 07:23 AM
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I don't believe the lady is crazy at all I believe that she did indeed converse with something with a scandinavian accent. Whether it be alien or human I don't know. But what I do know is that she went to the trouble of making sure that her experience was logged, even though she knew the consecuences of doing so that must speak for something.

My question is, why would they choose her?



[edit on 25-3-2009 by franspeakfree]

[edit on 25-3-2009 by franspeakfree]



posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 08:53 AM
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Originally posted by InfaRedMan
reply to post by projectvxn
 


Unless you're personally hired to defend the woman, then I would suggest you started with the attitude against my post.


No-one needs to be hired to defend someone from attack by a poster who is so offensive in such a personal way. You don't know her, you accuse her of having mental issues, and then you say she's an attention seeker.

You weren't there, you don't know what happened. I'm glad the person she spoke to on the phone was more sympathetic.


I can easily square the same argument at you. How can you say she's not crazy unless you know her personally or have studied psychology?


Most people, statistically, are not crazy. If you think that crazy = seeing UFOs, then there will be plenty of airline pilots, policemen, service personnel, etc., who will disagree with you.


Probability suggests it's just another attention seeker with a story to tell... albeit a really bad one.


I just love it when people say something like "probability suggests" to try and clothe their own naked prejudice in something that looks, to the causal eye, substantial.

What probability? Where are you getting your statistics from?

And on the "attention-seeking" business... she didn't even give her name to the person she spoke to (and she was upset enough to call twice) because she didn't want her name in the papers.

Please be more respectful and try actually thinking before posting. It just drags the level of debate down and accomplishes nothing.

On a more general level... this encounter fits with the idea that we're being gradually accustomed to encounters with aliens; that rather than "turning up on the White House lawn" as the saying goes, they're just contacting a few people here and there until the idea is something we're used to and comfortable with.

And, having read the Keel and Vallee books (which I also recommend, although I think they're both flawed for different reasons, but that's a whole other discussion), it doesn't seem that this incident is one of particularly high strangeness.

All the "scandinavian" (if she were versed in the literature, she'd have said "nordic") said was, "we're the ones making the crop circles". What's so odd about that?

What I wonder is, why was she so frightened? In fact, at what point did she become frightened? It doesn't really say in the report. For a conversation that lasted an hour, there's precious little detail there. Did she become terrified after she saw the object?

And what did her dog do? How did the dog react?

The dog, my dear Watson, did not bark in the night-time.

[edit on 25-3-2009 by rich23]



posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 09:24 AM
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Nordics having a scandinavian accent makes sense, sort of. They would blend more easily with the humans in these countries than in the rest of the world. But it's a first if I'm not mistaken. My favorite Nordics, Ummites, have a spanish or french accent. Aren't they all telepathic BTW?

[edit on 2009-3-25 by nablator]



posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 10:13 AM
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Ah, Ummo, wasn't that it? Haven't heard about that stuff in years. There have been quite a few accounts that describe aliens utterly indistinguishable from us, to the point that infiltration became something of a worry to the more paranoid in the US military.

I think the Scandi accent is a new wrinkle, though.



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