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Deadly plane crash at Tokyo airport

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posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


No I get your point quite well, and yes I am aware of the studies done prior to the first shovel dug into the ground when an airport is built.

They can either suspend flights till the wind clams down, or re-route the traffic. My point is that there are options available, and those options can and have been proven to save lives.

Here is an example of such an airport that obviously needs to either install another runway, or suspend/divert flights till weather conditions improve.

This flight got lucky...as did the people on board.


(click to open player in new window)



Cheers!!!!




posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 02:21 PM
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reply to post by RFBurns
 


Really, that was the old Hong Kong airport....

Nobody 'got lucky'....that B-747 was landed with skill.

Every pilot is taught how to perform a cross-wind landing. It involves what is known as a 'side-slip' with the upwind wing dipped slightly, and rudder used to keep the longitudinal axis of the airplane aligned with the Runway.

In large passenger jets, there is a limit to the bank angle, into the wind, that one can use....else you run a risk of scraping the Engine Nacelles.

Large jets are routinely landed in a 'crab' as part of their certification process, to show that he Landing Gear can accomodate the side loads. YouTube has various videos of this....

A pilot of a passenger jet wants to make it as smooth as possible, given the circumstances. Sometimes, it just doesn't work that well...but we get it done.



posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 02:30 PM
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Here's another cross wind landing:



I gotta say weedwhacker, landing like that for the first time would be bloody scary!!



posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


Yes Chad.....he ALMOST lost it there....but had the presence of mind to hit the TO/GA and reject the landing. (TO/GA is an acronym for Take-off/go-around).

IF the crosswinds on that day and time were outside the parameters, then that is why we have Alternates to divert to.

Prior to Dispatch, these things are taken into consideration. The Captain, in consult with the Dispatcher, decides, based on forecasts.

Extra fuel may be added, at Captain's request, irrepective of the Dispatcher's opinion. At least, that's how it works in the US. IF they both agree, fine....but is is always the Captain's call.....



posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 02:41 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
Large jets are routinely landed in a 'crab' as part of their certification process, to show that he Landing Gear can accomodate the side loads. YouTube has various videos of this....

A pilot of a passenger jet wants to make it as smooth as possible, given the circumstances. Sometimes, it just doesn't work that well...but we get it done.


Interestingly, the B-52 can land with the wheels straight, and the fuselage turned about 10 degrees into the wind. It really freaks you out when you see it the first few times.



posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


yes....Zaph....don't know much about the B-52....

But, looking at the design of the airplane, I can see why, when presented a crosswind, it might have to land in a 'crab'...else it would drag an engine nacelle.

Also, look at the under-carriage of a B-52.....all of the Maiin Landing Gear are in the fuselage....nothing out on the wings. (Except for the tip-gear, which were there for Taxi and Take-Off, retracted and not used for landing.)

Like i said....a crosswind landing is a 'finesse'....up to a point.

If you have to 'dip' your upwind wing too far, and risk dragging the engine Nacelles...then you compromise, and land 'crabbed'....won't feel good, but the airplane can take it.

EDIT....well....every airplane reacts differently. I can only speak about the ones I have flown. The MD-11, although similar to the DC-10-30, is still very different in many ways.


[edit on 3/25/0909 by weedwhacker]



posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by RFBurns
 


Runways are always built facing into the wind averages... but wind averages are just that; averages. Crosswind landing don't risk lives... improper landing technique in a quirky aircraft with extreme crosswind and possible windshear risks lives but judging from the amount of accidents I don't think that's much of an issue. Maybe they should change LSAS on the md-11 if that is outlined as the cause.

The video you linked was Kaitak which was closed 11 years ago.




[edit on 25/3/2009 by C0bzz]



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