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US Navy Vessels collide - spill 25,000 gallons of fuel into ocean

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posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 11:17 AM
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CNN) -- A U.S. Navy submarine collided with a Navy amphibious ship Friday in the Strait of Hormuz, mildly injuring 15 sailors, according to the commander of the U.S. Fifth Fleet.



The nuclear propulsion plant on the 362-foot-long sub was not damaged, but "New Orleans suffered a ruptured fuel tank, which resulted in an oil spill of approximately 25,000 gallons of diesel fuel marine," the release said.



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how do 2 highly advanced navigation and guidance systems let this happen?

with all the talk of a carbon tax coming, it sure would be cool to see a pollution fine imposed to these perpetrators.

just a little 25,000 gallon spill...




posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by zooplancton
 


I'm happy that the sailors are okay.

Your so concerned with mother nature you don't even take time out to thank God that nobody was seriously hurt.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 11:25 AM
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that was part of the irony. a small no-big-deal article about a collision where nobody got hurt.
(but there was 25,000 gallons of fuel spilled)



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 11:30 AM
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You would probably have a heart attack if you knew how much waste actually goes into the seas from ships.

I have seen fuel slicks the size of Rhode Island, remember 1 drop of F76 can cover 1 square foot of water.

Its sad but an accident, you should spend more time researching the horrors of offloading oily waste in Panama, now that is horrible.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 11:50 AM
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Originally posted by jd140
reply to post by zooplancton
 


I'm happy that the sailors are okay.

Your so concerned with mother nature you don't even take time out to thank God that nobody was seriously hurt.



Seiously man.... 25,000 gallons of oil got spilled into the ocean. Does that mean nothing to you?

Do you realise how fragile our planet has become as a result of stupid, stupid people?



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 11:56 AM
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Wonderful, 25,000 gallons.
That is sickening, I wonder how many poor innocent ocean creatures will die this time.

I like the previous post about the carbon tax BS!! They should tax the crap out of the Navy for this.....but they won't.

In a time when so many people are concerned about what we are doing to our home planet, which we are so obviously destroying, i'm surprised that this thread hasn't gotten more attention.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 01:30 PM
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Originally posted by zooplancton
how do 2 highly advanced navigation and guidance systems let this happen?




Remember the British and French nuclear submarines that crashed into each other in the centre of the Atlantic a few weeks ago.. its all pretty funny..

Pity about the oil spillage though..



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 02:24 PM
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Originally posted by s4dreamlnd93
You would probably have a heart attack if you knew how much waste actually goes into the seas from ships.

I have seen fuel slicks the size of Rhode Island, remember 1 drop of F76 can cover 1 square foot of water.

Its sad but an accident, you should spend more time researching the horrors of offloading oily waste in Panama, now that is horrible.


oh i'm very aware of how much ships pollute. i was in the US Navy long ago when they dumped their nightly trash overboad. i've seen insane slicks. that go for miles...

edit: i would like to look into the panama off-load issue. sounds horrifying.

[edit on 3/20/2009 by zooplancton]



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 02:34 PM
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reply to post by zooplancton
 


You have two ships in a 6 mile wide corridor, one of which is probably submerged at the time. Add to that the fact that sonar doesn't work well in that area due to the shallow depth, and you have the makings for a collision. This happened in January of 2007 when the USS Newport News collided with another ship in the same area while submerged.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by zooplancton
 


You have two ships in a 6 mile wide corridor, one of which is probably submerged at the time. Add to that the fact that sonar doesn't work well in that area due to the shallow depth, and you have the makings for a collision. This happened in January of 2007 when the USS Newport News collided with another ship in the same area while submerged.


that makes perfect sense. didn't think about shallow areas. thanks for the info.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 07:20 PM
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Both ships arrived in Bahrain safely. The USS Hartford reportedly has significant damage to her sail. Both ships were on their way to port for shore leave and provisions. All 15 injuries were on the Hartford.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 07:42 PM
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25,000 gallons isn't really anything. A hot tub holds like 300 gallons.



In reality, mother nature pollutes the ocean more then we do.




EJ



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by HorrorRoach
25,000 gallons isn't really anything. A hot tub holds like 300 gallons.
In reality, mother nature pollutes the ocean more then we do.



how so? geothermal vents?

on the 250,000 gallons not seeming to be much, i like to use the old adage:

"no radiation is better than some radiation".



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 10:48 AM
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Originally posted by zooplancton
how so? geothermal vents?

on the 250,000 gallons not seeming to be much, i like to use the old adage:

"no radiation is better than some radiation".


It was 25,000 and the fuel they use is designed to evaporate in the event of a spill.


"Aerial searches of the area where the fuel spill occurred were conducted yesterday, and revealed no indication of any remaining fuel on the ocean's surface," the Navy said. "The quick dissipation of the fuel is likely due to the type of fuel, and various environmental factors to include air and water temperatures, winds and seas."

edition.cnn.com...



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