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Desperate Japanese head to 'suicide forest'

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posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 08:57 AM
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Desperate Japanese head to 'suicide forest'


www.cnn.com

AOKIGAHARA FOREST, Japan (CNN) -- Aokigahara Forest is known for two things in Japan: breathtaking views of Mount Fuji and suicides. Also called the Sea of Trees, this destination for the desperate is a place where the suicidal disappear, often never to be found in the dense forest.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 08:57 AM
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Man, this is so sad, and I remember seeing this place chronicled on a show called "Destination Truth". The team went there to investigate reports of the place being legendary for GHOSTS of those who had taken their lives there.

They not only ran into several apparitions and weird activity (which scared the heck out of them), but saw abandoned tents with rations of food still in them.

What a sad, tragic situation that so many are ending their lives due to the economic struggle, which is only going to escalate exponentially in the coming future...

www.cnn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



[edit on 20-3-2009 by DimensionalDetective]



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 09:08 AM
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I also watched this episode it was quite erie in my opinion, would like to see TAPS go there and do their thing that would be quite interesting. The saddest thing to me was when they found someones torn up pictures and credit cards in the little holes, that affected me for some reason.

It is sad that such things are going on, I fear that it can only get worse from here on out.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by s4dreamlnd93
 


Yeah, I remember that. It was so to the point in terms of where that poor soul was. All hope had vanished for them.

I had reported on this back in april of 2008, as a rash of suicides triggered alarm there. People were huffing a common detergent ingredient, causing grave concerns not only to its easy accessibility, but that the fumes being used in these instances maybe affecting others in the area:

www.usatoday.com...



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 03:12 PM
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Just found the youtube imbed of the video clip from CNN:



Really sad. They report "hundreds" have gone there to end their lives, but my guess is that it is a LOT more than that, as this place has been known for this for quite some time. I'm betting those numbers are more like in the tens of thousands.

But it does appear that they are trying to curb this tragedy---They have upped the surveillance and patrolling. But this place is MASSIVE, so they have their work cut out for them.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 03:23 PM
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Its good to see other Japanese helping each other in that way to stop suicide.
Because for a long time in Japan, suicide was considered the honorable right thing to do.
And trying to stop someone from doing it considered offensive and depriving someone of there honor.
Its good to see them waking up and realizing losing money is not worth losing your life over.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 07:09 PM
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Still amazes me the giant differences between human emotions and the psyche all around the world..... As sad as it is , their culture has seen this as a legitimate way out for 100's of years


Is the world really getting that bad ???



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 07:27 PM
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Their culture used to view it as a dishonorable disgrace to live in defeat. Many still do.

Thing is, their ancestors never defined the difference between defeat in battle, and defeat in the financial world... though, it's easy to see that many view their work as a battle in some sense.


Yes, our culture views suicide in a different way. Western religions shaped that in part, claiming suicide is a direct path to damnation.
Others simply dislike it because it leaves families in a state of loss.

Then again, most cultures have a weird way of mourning when someone dies. rather than celebrating their life and the chance to have known them... to me, that's bizarre.

... unfortunately for the western world, that same ideology gets in the way of other things, like sympathetic assisted suicide. (When someone has no hope of recovery, and is doomed to spend years dying slowly and painfully on a bed. Happens more than you'd like to think.)


And then there's some that view suicide as noble, so long as you take down those who caused your suffering with you.


Either way, no story is ever black and white. And judging someone for suicide is never an honorable thing to do. Helping them with the problem that caused their suffering is.

[edit on 20-3-2009 by johnsky]



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 07:41 PM
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Since the 1950s, more than 500 people have lost their lives in the forest, mostly suicides,[1] with approximately 30 suicides counted yearly.[2]



In 2002, 78 bodies were found within the forest, replacing the previous record of 73 in 1998.[3] The high rate of suicide has led officials to place signs within the forest, urging those who have gone there specifically with the purpose of suicide in mind to seek help and not kill themselves. The annual search, consisting of a small army of police, volunteers and attendant journalists, began in 1970.


And

After the first kilometer into Aokigahara towards Mount Fuji, the forest is in a much more pristine state, with little to no litter or obvious signs of human contact. On some occasions human remains can be found in the distant reaches of the forest, but these are usually more than a few years old and consist of scattered bones and incomplete skeletons suggesting the presence of scavenging animals.



I found this interesting.

Japan's Self Defence Force and the US Military regularly run training practices through portions of the forest, during which military grade lensatic compasses have been verified to function properly. Vehicles, GPS equipment, and other electronic devices function properly.


While this is a dreadful amount of lives lost from depression, there's the other thousands of people yearly in Japan who jump in front of the commuter trains too.

[edit on 20/3/09 by Nventual]



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 08:20 PM
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Originally posted by Nventual
While this is a dreadful amount of lives lost from depression, there's the other thousands of people yearly in Japan who jump in front of the commuter trains too.


Yeah, that goes on all over the world. The numbers of subway hits in North America are likely getting pretty high lately.

It's amazing how quickly those cleanup crews work in unison with local law... though, I wouldn't want the job.


I don't think this story was in any way attempting to segment japan from the rest of the world and make them look like a problem zone... rather, it's indicative of a problem that's growing everywhere, and the suicide rates that follow.
Japan just happened to have a forest named after it.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 08:29 PM
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I watched this DT episode about 6 montyhs ago. It was definatley depressing to say the least. I am not religious in any sense but that place , from my opinion has some bad juju.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 


["which is only going to escalate exponentially in the coming future..."

Damn! Now there's some words of encouragement.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 09:53 PM
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It's good that the authorities are trying to help at this location. Unfortunately, I have to believe that these people find very little encouragement from all those around them in everday life. I think we all know how cold the world can be, regardless of country. I really wish that there was more compassion and understanding in everyday life and interactions.

Sure there are the pleasantries, the smile and wave. But it's mostly a veneer. You know that there are very few who would go out of their way for you. Most of the time it doesn't matter I guess, but when times like these bring people low they find out all too quickly.


Although I have to acknowledge that pride enters into the picture somewhere since there is help out there. Being a burden on others, self pity, I can understand that stuff.......just sad, that's all.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 10:00 PM
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posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 10:03 PM
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Originally posted by johnsky



And then there's some that view suicide as noble, so long as you take down those who caused your suffering with you.



Who are these people? I've never heard of them, except the aftermath on the nightly news...those people?

And for the record, you have to to be sick-sick to murder and suicide, which is simply a combination of hate and cowardly behavior.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 10:11 PM
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Well, for one, the ancient samurais use to do it to prove their honour.

Don't quote me on that, maybe I watch too many martial-arts movies.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 10:15 PM
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reply to post by Nventual
 


You are correct, however the practice happened even all the way up through WW2. It is called Seppuku (sp?) When one dihonors himself on the battlefield it is his duty to absolve his dishonor by cutting into the belly sideways and then up and then back across if you are still capable. The pain that is released is your act of atonement.

[edit on 20-3-2009 by djvexd]

[edit on 20-3-2009 by djvexd]



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 10:17 PM
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What's with CNN lately?

Every story out of Japan over the past few months seems to have been trying to make thing out to be as negative as possible for some reason. Yes, I know the job of the media is to report the bad news, but they seem to be going above and beyond recently, like the world is ending or something.

Couple that with the absurd notion that some westerners - the CNN reporter included - seem to cling to that everyone in Japan is still a samurai and clinging to bushido, and it makes for some seriously cringeworthy reading.

Japan has a suicide problem - as do many countries. The reasons people kill themselves in Japan are no different than the reasons people make the same choice in Kansas City or London or Moscow. There's no grand social code in Japan that tells people here to kill themselves like good little samurai to preserve the honour of the family if they screw up at work. Japanese are Japanese, not Klingons.

Japan's suicide rate - according to the latest figures I can find - is the 8th highest in the world. But - because Japan - a non Judeo Christian nation - does not have the same religious taboo on suicide as the west, more suicides are actually reported as suicides, as opposed to "death by misadventure" or "accidental asphyxiation" or "overdose" or any of the other terms used in the west to spare families the social shame of their true fate being found out (not to mention the family being able to collect on life insurance and so forth). It happens more than you might think, especially in Canada.



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by vox2442
 


Have you ever studied Shinto? While the countries suicide rate IS llower. The religion has nothing to do with it. It has more to do with the workload and pressure placed on most Japenese to succeed. As Americans alot of us can't comprehend the amount of pressure placed on a Japenese citizen to not just succeed but more than not survive To fail in the Japenese scoiety, especially for tradionalists is a life changing thing. Not being able to support your family for alot, is the same as the world ending. Alot of progressives and younger people don't feel this way but the sentiment is deeply rooted in thier history and culture. I know someone will try and twist my post as a veiled attempt at racism. This post is not that kind of post.
And YES i did just notice I used the word *post* way too many times. dammit.


[edit on 20-3-2009 by djvexd]

[edit on 20-3-2009 by djvexd]



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 10:57 PM
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Originally posted by djvexd
reply to post by vox2442
 


Have you ever studied Shinto? While the countries suicide rate IS llower. The religion has nothing to do with it. It has more to do with the workload and pressure placed on most Japenese to succeed. As Americans alot of us can't comprehend the amount of pressure placed on a Japenese citizen to not just succeed but more than not survive. I know someone wilol try and twist my post as a veiled attempt at racism. This post is not that kind of post.
And YES i did just notice I used the word *post* way too many times. dammit.


[edit on 20-3-2009 by djvexd]


There's a small shinto shrine up the road from me. I play golf with the kannushi once in a while, and he's roped me into carrying the mikoshi against my better judgment on a couple of occasions. While I concede that I have never sat down and made a study of Shinto, I am quite familiar with it. Did you have a question?

The workload thing is another stereotype that I laugh about. The most I've ever put in here has been 60/wk, and that's only once a year. No one in my office has ever put in more than that, unless it's been an absolute crisis with several people off sick. I've done that in Canada for weeks at a shot. 40 a week is normal for most people. 45 for some. 60 for upper management from time to time, breaks included. Know anyone working those hours in your home town?

Bottom line - from my perspective, having worked professionally in Canada and Japan - is that people want you to believe that the Japanese (and Koreans, and Chinese, etc) have it sooooo much worse than you. Wether it's suicide, or economic news, or the cost of living, doesn't matter.

Working around the clock and blowing their heads off because they can't make ends meet. See how great your life is by comparison? Insert stock footage of the 8:30 train at Ikebukuro.

Thing is, it's not actually like that. Rent on a 1 bedroom apartment in Tokyo is cheaper than Toronto. 17 national holidays, paid, plus 2 weeks a year vacation to start. Everything is closed in Japan from May 2 - 6th inclusive. Sure, they've got a word for "death by overwork". In English, we'll just talk around the problem, just like with suicide.



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