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Oldest flying Boeing

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posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 12:38 PM
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Got this in an email and thought it was incredibly cool.

Addison Pemberton and his family, and a crew of volunteers spent 8 years restoring a Boeing 40C that crashed in the mountains of Oregon in 1928. They made their first flight February 17, 2007.

The aircraft is 34 feet long, and 13 feet tall. It has a wingspan of 44 1/2 feet long. The passengers flew in an enclosed cabin, while the pilot flew in an open cockpit behind the cabin. Mr. Pemberton says that on the first flight he got the feeling that he could have climbed out of the cockpit and walked around the wings until it was time to land, and the plane would have kept right on flying without him.

Boeing 40C

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www.airmailpioneers.org...




posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 12:55 PM
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Beautiful plane!

The days of old and the planes that came with those times are simply exquisite.

Thank you.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 01:13 PM
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Wow! What a tiny passenger cabin - looks like you literally had to crawl into it. But I'm sure it was better than sitting outside.

Very interesting - thanks for sharing.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 01:19 PM
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Absolutely gorgeous bird!

I am always struck by how long the open cockpit design lasted. Was that because they didn't have windshield wipers or was it a tradition like in horse carriages and early cars where the chauffeur rode in the elements while the monied rode behind warm and dry?



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by stikkinikki
 


IIRC the open cockpit was used because of the slow speeds, and to give the pilot access to the aircraft around him. The upper wing was where several designs kept the fuel for the plane. There was a petcock above the cockpit that the pilot could reach, and on aircraft that were armed the pilot had access to the guns to try to fix jams, etc.

When they went to the monoplane design, the speeds increased due to better aerodynamics and bigger engines. Several WWII fighters were lost after going into steep dives, in what they believe were Mach tucks. This caused the controls to stop responding, and they crashed. This would have made things extremely hard for the pilots if they had an open cockpit.

Of course the above post could be completely wrong, because I'm going from what I remember. I no longer have access to any of my books. My succubus, I mean ex-wife caused me to lose everything I had in storage, which was where most of my books were.



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 11:29 PM
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Oldest flying Boeing


That must be our oldest classic's. Some of them even have te paddle switches for the ap.



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 11:31 PM
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The lines on that plane are NICE!

A really good looking plane.



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by stikkinikkiopen cockpit design


Haven't heard of that since i flew the twin otter.

[edit on 3-4-2009 by Ivar_Karlsen]



posted on Apr, 4 2009 @ 12:02 AM
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BTW my sis flies a Do 228-200 (Former Cato bird) just a curtain between the cockpit and the cabin.



posted on Apr, 4 2009 @ 01:05 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Indeed a beutiful aircraft. As an airline pilot i would have kept a safe distance to that plane.
Wish we had DC3's in service today, BUT, flying B737 classicks and NG's makes it worth it. Anyway i only have 3 years until retirement.
Let me say this: I've flown A321, B772. and are now flying B737 classic and NG.
I guess that the B737 is the best aircraft that i'm ever gonna fly, and that day that i have to quit what i'm doing today it's gonna be with a big smile on my face because i was lucky enough to fly the best aircraft around.




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