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Scientists aim to replicate the Sun

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posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 11:29 PM
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Scientists aim to replicate the power of the Sun in a new nuclear fusion experiment involving laser beams being fired at a tiny pellet of hydrogen. The set up is capable of generating 500 trillion watts, and if successful could pave the way for a future where clean energy is available in almost unlimited quanitites to everyone.

"Scientists in California say they're trying to replicate the power of the sun by firing laser beams at a tiny pellet of hydrogen. Physicists at the National Ignition Facility in Livermore say the nuclear fusion experiments may offer the world a clean source of energy, The Times of London reported Sunday. The hydrogen pellet will be hit with 192 laser beams capable of generating 500 trillion watts -- 1,000 times the power of the U.S. national grid, said the scientists."


www.unexplained-mysteries.com...
www.upi.com...

Could someone explain how this will be useful in the long run? Why the dangers don't outweigh whatever possibilities exist? I'm not really getting it. I understand the LHC isn't as scary as people make it out to be, but this? This is weird. It's like trying to play god, but with something that actually exists and can kill the hell out of you 3 billion times over.

Edit: Sorry about not putting the link in. D:

[edit on 18-3-2009 by sadisticwoman]




posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 11:37 PM
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Does the source you're quoting say whether this nuclear fusion reaction will be self-sustaining (and ongoing), or will they have to keeping zapping the pellet with lasers in order for it to work?



posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 11:53 PM
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I think that if more energy comes out this fusion than involved in creating these beams onto the hydrogen "pelets" it will be self sustainable.

My question?

If this pellet goes about making all this energy as stated above how are they going to go about harnessing it? Is it going to be a huge well insulated steammachine? I am no expert in fusion stuf etc but i think my question is logical. Anyone?

EDIT TO ADD: If this sun replica is feasible at all.

[edit on 18/3/2009 by GEORGETHEGREEK]



posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 11:57 PM
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This might sound silly, but I remember someone telling me once that if this were to be developed we would eventually run out of water.

Does that make any sense?



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 12:09 AM
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Even if it is self sustaining, it still has to draw it's fuel from somewhere unless they're saying it's going to get it's energy from the 'aether' or pull it from a higher dimension... etc.

Sounds like their spouting rumors of an over unity process... which in my mind is complete BS! You have to steal from Peter to give to Paul. E=MC2.

IRM



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 12:33 AM
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Originally posted by sadisticwoman

Scientists aim to replicate the power of the Sun in a new nuclear fusion experiment involving laser beams being fired at a tiny pellet of hydrogen. The set up is capable of generating 500 trillion watts, and if successful could pave the way for a future where clean energy is available in almost unlimited quanitites to everyone.

"Scientists in California say they're trying to replicate the power of the sun by firing laser beams at a tiny pellet of hydrogen. Physicists at the National Ignition Facility in Livermore say the nuclear fusion experiments may offer the world a clean source of energy, The Times of London reported Sunday. The hydrogen pellet will be hit with 192 laser beams capable of generating 500 trillion watts -- 1,000 times the power of the U.S. national grid, said the scientists."


www.unexplained-mysteries.com...
www.upi.com...

Could someone explain how this will be useful in the long run? Why the dangers don't outweigh whatever possibilities exist? I'm not really getting it. I understand the LHC isn't as scary as people make it out to be, but this? This is weird. It's like trying to play god, but with something that actually exists and can kill the hell out of you 3 billion times over.

Edit: Sorry about not putting the link in. D:

[edit on 18-3-2009 by sadisticwoman]


If only the ultimate goal were for clean, sustainable, energy...but why do I see them creating the world's biggest, most powerful bomb that would scare the heck out of von Braun.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 03:13 AM
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The rewards of controlled nuclear fusion will be priceless and they will be shared by the whole human race. Such rewards are not gained without risk. This is something our forefathers recognized, which we, in our air-conditioned, safety-labelled, overegulated modern societies have forgotten.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 04:10 AM
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Originally posted by InfaRedMan
Even if it is self sustaining, it still has to draw it's fuel from somewhere unless they're saying it's going to get it's energy from the 'aether' or pull it from a higher dimension... etc.

Sounds like their spouting rumors of an over unity process... which in my mind is complete BS! You have to steal from Peter to give to Paul. E=MC2.

IRM



where have you been?

The national ignition facility is a fusion reactor experiment based at Lawrence Livermoore National Laboratory, one of three fusion reactor projects going on.
It is unofficially complete now and wil be started up next year.
The interesting thing is that a business associate of mine knows a guy who owned a fabrication shop that bid on machine work for the 140 something laser cabinets.
he got the job because he was the super low bid, except he didnt read the rather extensive specifications package and missed the part about how the cabinets were to be washed to clean room standards and hermeticaly sealed in plastic for shipping.

They have to be absoluetly oil and dust free.

The british have acheived a self sustaining fusion reaction, on a very limited scale at this point.

the japanese have their own project but I have no idea where they are at with it.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 04:35 AM
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If only the ultimate goal were for clean, sustainable, energy...but why do I see them creating the world's biggest, most powerful bomb that would scare the heck out of von Braun.


Nuclear fusion is already used in thermonuclear weapons since the 1950's. To start a fusion reaction in one of these weapons you need a normal fission weapon to create the temperatures and pressures required (similar to the SUN) to start to fuse hydrogen isotopes (Deuterium, Tritium) together.

The goal here is to acheive them pressures and temperatures with laser beams and be abled to control the reaction, without a nuke. It will not generate power as it is scientific only; maybe a future reactor will. According to wikipedia Fusion in commercial power use will not be available to after 2050.

[edit on 19/3/2009 by C0bzz]



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 06:53 AM
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reply to post by punkinworks
 


You've lost me mate. I have no idea of the point you're trying to make. What exactly is it that you're saying? What are you disagreeing with? I'm puzzled!

IRM



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by InfaRedMan
 





Even if it is self sustaining, it still has to draw it's fuel from somewhere unless they're saying it's going to get it's energy from the 'aether' or pull it from a higher dimension... etc.

Sounds like their spouting rumors of an over unity process... which in my mind is complete BS! You have to steal from Peter to give to Paul. E=MC2.





Nuclear fusion is hardly over unity BS.

The fuel pellet is where the energy is from.

on a side note the NIF did a limited test fire of all 196 lasers last week.
The first ignition experiment should be running by early next year.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 01:48 PM
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I'm also wondering how the reaction is controlled or regulated? Does the fuel pellet have to be constantly heated up again to sustain the reaction? What I'm getting at is how is the reaction contained? What's to stop it from becoming a self sustaining star and consuming our world in the process



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by warpboost
 


No the fuel pellet is heated and put under enough pressure to keep the fusion going. The reaction is contained by a magnetic field.
There isnt enough mass for the pellet to explode it would only burn out.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 06:01 PM
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reply to post by sadisticwoman
 


Waste of money...totally pointless.

firing potshots at one pea a time which must be in a VERY EXACT position each time.

And then the ultra clean chamber is contaminated making it useless for the next shot!

morons.

They should pour the money into the polywell reactor by Robert Bussard.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 06:09 PM
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The BBC has run a show that was called 'How to make a star on earth' and it went over this exact machine. It was a great show i wouldnt mind watching it again.

news.bbc.co.uk...

or you can watch it on iplayer here if you are in the UK only
www.bbc.co.uk...

Maybe someone else can find a better link.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 06:14 PM
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Originally posted by sadisticwoman
The hydrogen pellet will be hit with 192 laser beams capable of generating 500 trillion watts -- 1,000 times the power of the U.S. national grid, said the scientists."


I suppose the laser beams-generating assembly doesn't run on AA batteries. The article is missing an interesting part: how much juice is needed to get that fancy tan.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 06:24 PM
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There are a few different approaches being made, the US based National Ignition Facility (NIF) in California are firing the lasers.
Jet/Iter in France plan a different way involving plasma.
And the Z Machine uses a web of thin wires with half a trillion watts to heat the pellet and has already reached fusion once.

National Ignition facility

Iter

The Z Machine

JET

[edit on 19-3-2009 by pazcat]



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 05:36 AM
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Originally posted by pazcat
There are a few different approaches being made, the US based National Ignition Facility (NIF) in California are firing the lasers.
Jet/Iter in France plan a different way involving plasma.
And the Z Machine uses a web of thin wires with half a trillion watts to heat the pellet and has already reached fusion once.

National Ignition facility

Iter

The Z Machine

JET

[edit on 19-3-2009 by pazcat]


The reason fusion will never work is that it is run by committee.

it is little more than a expensive job creation scheme now.


billions wasted on the same dead end methods.

fusion power will always be 50 years away....


Tokamak is the wrong shape.

what shape is the sun?


fusion power will always be 50 years away....

[edit on 20-3-2009 by esecallum]

[edit on 20-3-2009 by esecallum]



posted on Mar, 20 2009 @ 08:42 AM
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The problem of course is that stars are big and hot; the Sun is the size of a million Earths, and burns six hundred million tonnes of hydrogen fuel every second. The temperature at its core is 15 million degrees, and this is barely enough to allow fusion to take place at anything other than a snail's pace.
Jet, the Joint European Torus, routinely heats a cocktail of different forms of hydrogen known as deuterium and tritium to well over one hundred million degrees and initiates nuclear fusion at a rate far in excess of that in the centre of the Sun.

news.bbc.co.uk...

Its kind of interesting to note though even if they have not created fusion yet that they have created something on earth that is nearly 10 times as hot as the sun and can do it quite often. I think we are well on the way anyway and if it can ever be mastered will be one of the greatest achievments in science.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 04:08 AM
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the main question i would like to ask the people behind this machine,
if the machine is powered conventionally to create new 'power',
and the resulting 'power' is far in excess of what the conventional power grid can sustain,
then how exactly are you going to route the new 'power' into the grid,
or do they plan on having 2 seperate co-existing power grids?




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