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New Mexico governor repeals death penalty

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posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 09:04 PM
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Originally posted by skeptic1

If nothing is perfect, then how can we possibly justify imprisoning someone for life? That's not fair, either, is it?


Put them in prison for life and they are later found to be innocent of the crime, we can let them go.

Put them to death and they are later found to be innocent of the crime, well, You've seriously limited your options on correcting a wrong.

The state can not be trusted with the power of life and death over its citizens. They are not that trustworthy.




posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 09:07 PM
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reply to post by mrwupy
 


And, what if they are guilty beyond any doubt?

We can justifying providing them food, clothing, shelter, cable, etc., for the rest of their worthless lives with our tax dollars?? Child killers? Serial killers? Spree killers? Viscious murderers??

I have a problem with that.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by skeptic1
 


And what if the evidence against them is fabricated by the state in order to quickly clear up a high profile case?

Do you really trust the police that much, You trust them with your life?

I don't.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 09:17 PM
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reply to post by mrwupy
 


Not everything is a conspiracy. I know, wrong site for that kind of talk, but still.....


If there is DNA evidence, if there are eye witnesses, if there is a confession.....even then the death penalty isn't justified?

In cases like that, life imprisonment isn't justified. It is not enough.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 10:02 PM
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Maybe he was afraid of getting the death penalty, this guy has more skeletons in his closet than death himself.


2 cents.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 10:33 PM
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I believe in a state being able to determine this issue. For those that don't live in the state effected why would you care so much? Both sides of the argument have valid points, but that decision is best left for each state to decide through their elected representatives.



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 10:36 PM
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Allow me to think in a criminal mindset for a moment.....

If I was a criminal and I knew that my crime was punishable by death.

I would kill all the witnesses to lessen my chance of being identified. Using this logic, more death would be a result of the death penality, not less.

What's killing a few more to keep from getting caught?



posted on Mar, 19 2009 @ 10:44 PM
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Originally posted by skeptic1
reply to post by mrwupy
 


If there is DNA evidence, if there are eye witnesses, if there is a confession.....even then the death penalty isn't justified?


No, it's not.

Remember the kids who went "Wilding" through Central Park a few decades ago? They confessed, even testified against one another and when it was all settled they had been wrongly convicted.

They were children and the police and prosecutors had fed them a line and lead them into wrongful confessions.

They spent years in jail for a crime the state just wanted to hurry up and get off the books.

I do not trust the state with the power of life or death, Not your life and certainly not mine.



posted on Mar, 28 2009 @ 05:35 PM
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"I do not trust the state with the power of life or death"

I do not trust the state period!



posted on Mar, 29 2009 @ 02:33 AM
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Originally posted by mrwupy
You on the other hand get a public defender who can't make it in the world as a real lawyer.


Ignorant comment.


Good for New Mexico though.



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