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US Economy Is Finally Showing Signs of a Recovery

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posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 04:56 PM
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Uh Oh doom and gloomers look like we are not heading for a great depression, the end of the world, or even the end of the USA as we know it.

Call off Depression 2.0.

While still far from health, the U.S. economy is showing some encouraging signs of life as consumers tiptoe back to the shopping mall, home builders pick up their hammers, and manufacturers clear out inventory.

That suggests the soon-to-be-completed first quarter will be as bad as it gets, and apocalyptic fears of another lengthy, painful Great Depression look unwarranted.
Source

Obviously this isnt the end of the recession, but maybe we are starting to see the bottom. One can hope at least.




posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by tide88
 


I hope your right , but your source can be bought for a double Scotch



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by tide88
 


Ben Bernanke with the Federal Reserve said the U.S. is near the worst point, and that this could all be over by around 2nd quarter 2010. I did notice the Help Wanted section in the local newspaper is larger than it has been in some time. Maybe is the spring? All of this nice weather has people in better moods and a happy outlook.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:08 PM
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I'm not going to bet on it.
There have been a couple of encouraging signs, but who's to say these aren't just little plateaus on our way down?? Let's not count our chickens just yet, as other credit-related problems seem to be well on their way to worsening the situation.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:10 PM
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Yeah CNBC... come on. They've been drinking kool aid all the way from 14.000 to 6600 saying it was the bottom everyday. That it wasn't that bad... yeah right.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:13 PM
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I WISH but I can't buy it...
I think it's simply the calm before the raging storm.

The credit card mess hasn't even hit nor has commerical real estate losses...HUGE shopping centers down here,all new,no tenants.

I am afraid it will get a lot worse.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:16 PM
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They are very good at giving a little (so they can take a lot). Right now is the calm before the storm.

So you can rub yourself with this story and feel all googly-good, but that does not change the fact that they have trillions sitting in financial institutions worldwide, doing nothing and having no effect on the economy at large.

When they have sold all the debt the market will bear, worldwide, THEN they will pump all those trillions into the pipeline, and we will see Naziesque hyper-inflation, crashing the world's economy as the debt becomes worthless, and They will step in as the "solution."

Then we will have no more control, and the extermination of most of us will begin.

But you can believe that all is really ok. Fine with me.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by irishchic
I think it's simply the calm before the raging storm.


It would seem we see much the same thing! I was typing my post when you were posting yours, but we both saw the calm before a very nasty storm.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by Amaterasu
 



I believe the worst is over. Sure credit card defaults will go up but those same companies are also raising interest rates and fees to cover those loses. As for the commercial market, if retail sales start to improve like this article claims and banks lets those customers refinance those loans or keep lower interest rates, which I gurantee they will, we should be able to advert those two crisis'. They arent going to let the same thing happen with the commercial market as they did with the housing market. Obviously I believe any good news is good. So although I am not rubbing the story all over myself to feel good, I am seeing some positive out of it. And if it get consumer confidence up, we very well may be seeing the end of this mess. However I will still take a wait and see approach to the whole thing. ONe of us is right, for the sake of the world you better hope it is me. Time will tell.


[edit on 17-3-2009 by tide88]



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:35 PM
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This is merely the beginning of the end. Like the others posted, commercial real estate and credit cards still must go.

Anyone that believes a thing Bernanke says is plainly still SLEEPING, a nice ignorant slumber.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:37 PM
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I remember watching a video of an illuminati insider that said they would make the economy look as if it is rebounding, getting investors to reinvest all their money to make up for lost money. Then they would bring the system to it's knees robbing everyone of their money.

What is suspect to me is how the government took so long to recognize the recession, yet a week of rebounding in the stock market they proclaim it's the end of the downturn. Have they forgotten the trillions of dollars they just printed, that we will have to repay, through inflation, taxation, and interest on normal purchases? When that hits that is when the economy will collapse. I believe we are only seeing temporary benefits of sticking a pole under a collapsing roof.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:37 PM
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Someone in an unrelated thread mentioned another good point that I think is also valid here:

Unemployment benefits have been "extended" for now but what happens when alllllll those benefits run dry?
There are no jobs to replace the ones lost.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:39 PM
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There was also a calm in 1929..The market improved, then it crashed like a dead bird... It's getting better?? Tell that to the millions that are laid off, jobless, and homeless..



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by blujay
This is merely the beginning of the end. Like the others posted, commercial real estate and credit cards still must go.

Anyone that believes a thing Bernanke says is plainly still SLEEPING, a nice ignorant slumber.


As I said above banks are already offsetting their loses by raising interest rates, cutting rewards, and imposing yearly fees. I think credit card defaults will have a minimum impact these banks bottom lines.banks raising credit card fees to offset defaults Some are also doing away with free checking, raising overdraft fees, atm fees, etc. You would be surprised how resourceful banks can be when they are trying to recoup money.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:42 PM
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Originally posted by tide88
reply to post by Amaterasu
 

I believe the worst is over. Sure credit card defaults will go up but those same companies are also raising interest rates and fees to cover those loses.
[edit on 17-3-2009 by tide88]


By raising their interest rates by as much as 28%?


Obviously you haven't heard of the term "sucker's rally", also known as "bear trap".



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:44 PM
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Originally posted by MissysWorld
There was also a calm in 1929..The market improved, then it crashed like a dead bird... It's getting better?? Tell that to the millions that are laid off, jobless, and homeless..
Yes, I think it is getting better. That doesnt mean everyone is going to get their jobs back the first sign of a turn around. Obviously it going to take time for the economy to fully recover. Nowhere do I claim that the economy is fine. I am just pointing out that there is a possiblity of a bottoming of this mess and we may indeed see a quicker recovery then people think. Especially on this board were everyone thinks this is the end of the world.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:48 PM
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Any thread with CNBC as a source cannot even be taken seriously. Jon Stewart proved that they cannot be taken seriously just in case there was any doubt. Like someone else posted a little before me, they have been drinking the kool-aid since day one.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:48 PM
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Originally posted by eldard

Originally posted by tide88
reply to post by Amaterasu
 

I believe the worst is over. Sure credit card defaults will go up but those same companies are also raising interest rates and fees to cover those loses.
[edit on 17-3-2009 by tide88]


By raising their interest rates by as much as 28%?


Obviously you haven't heard of the term "sucker's rally", also known as "bear trap".


Yes, by raising those interest rates and charging yearly fees. I know it is a rip off but they have to offset loses somehow. Is it fair, no. I wasnt talking about the stock market rally either. I am more enthused about this part of the article.

The latest evidence came Tuesday when the government said housing starts and building permits rebounded in February.

This followed last week's figures on retail sales, which showed consumers were starting to buy more than just the basics. Discretionary categories including electronics and furniture showed surprising strength.

"We get a sense that consumers are not necessarily cowering in their fox holes like they were in the fourth quarter, right after Lehman Brothers blew up," said Jay Bryson, global economist at Charlotte, North Carolina-based Wachovia [WB 5.54 --- UNCH (0) ].

"Some of the shock is over. Granted, consumer confidence isn't high at all, but the shock is over," he added.

Businesses that were caught off-guard by the steep drop in consumer spending over the final months of 2008 have been paring inventories aggressively to start the year. That means if the bounce in spending holds up, manufacturers will soon need to boost production.
This data is much more important then the market going up in my opinion.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:49 PM
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I HOPE that this is the bottoming out of our economic woes, but I have serious doubts. I will wait and see like everyone else, as I am no financial expert. I'm going to stick with listening to the economists who have kept me well informed from the get go, and who saw this whole thing coming for years.

Wish in one hand, S**t in the other, right?



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:50 PM
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Originally posted by tide88
reply to post by Amaterasu
 



I believe the worst is over.


And I believe that's what they want us to believe.


Sure credit card defaults will go up but those same companies are also raising interest rates and fees to cover those loses. As for the commercial market, if retail sales start to improve like this article claims and banks lets those customers refinance those loans or keep lower interest rates, which I gurantee they will, we should be able to advert those two crisis'.


Sure, these things would help a bit if we didn't have ourselves set up with those trillions set to flood the economy.


They arent going to let the same thing happen with the commercial market as they did with the housing market.


I think it's too little too late...


Obviously I believe any good news is good.


And I believe that any "good news" should be taken with a grain of salt at this point, since we know there are those doing "analysis" and such with the goal to pacify us. Keep us calm and "hoping."

Because the trillions in the financial institutions, and the debt sales, were NOT accidents. They were planned. And if they are planned, we must make allowances for this behavior when we are evaluating "good news."


So although I am not rubbing the story all over myself to feel good, I am seeing some positive out of it. And if it get consumer confidence up, we very well may be seeing the end of this mess.


"Consumer confidence" is really an unrelated element when it comes to hyper-inflation ala Nazis. Short term, it may look good, but if we don't address the issue of all those "dollars" set to kill the world's economy regardless of consumer confidence, it won't make one whit of difference.


However I will still take a wait and see approach to the whole thing. ONe of us is right, for the sake of the world you better hope it is me. Time will tell.


And so will examining the setup. Do you think they pumped trillions into the financial institutions merely to leave them there in perpetuity? I suspect not.

And if they come flooding into the economy at large, there is no escape from hyper-inflation, which in turn will prompt a cry for "help." And They WILL be there to "help."



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