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Aliens in space? ISRO discovers extraterrestrial life

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posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 11:41 PM
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In my digging I haven't been able to find anything on mercury and bacteria either, a linky would be great, or at least some further information.




posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by Shere Khaan
 

When I read this thread the first thing that sprung to mind was what RF wrote, I do remember hearing in the 70's that the capsules and astranauts had to be cleared of bacterial threat before normal human interaction could resume as it could live in the seals even through reentry heat???
Sorry but I'm going back decades here, and I dont know much about it, but it was kinda a known thing, you couldnt get to the astranauts till they were cleared of space bacteria. ...or maybe im just remembering a 'I dream of Jenie' episode.....
Cheers Zazz

[edit on 21-3-2009 by zazzafrazz]



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 12:09 AM
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reply to post by zazzafrazz
 

When the Apollo 11 astronauts returned to Earth they were kept in quarantine for 21 days as a precaution against the remote possibility of biological contamination on the Moon.

After testing was carried out on the lunar samples, the procedure was abandoned for subsequent missions.
lsda.jsc.nasa.gov...

I still have not found any documentation of bacteria being found or of any concern on the exterior of any of the capsules, Apollo or prior.

[edit on 3/22/2009 by Phage]



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 12:36 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


That would sound about right Phage, As I said, going back 30 years... I had a glance and all I can see is that bacteria grows more viralent in space

"Postflight Variation in the Major Components of the Autoflora.—Aerobic Bacteria.—Prior to the Skylab missions, several authors had theorized that major microflora changes might occur during space flight and that these changes might not be compatible with man’s health and welfare on extended missions (refs. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,10,11,12,13, 14, 15). The theoretical change which was most often proposed called for a "microbial simplification" which may be defined as a major decrease in the number of different types of micro-organisms in the autoflora. To evaluate this hypothesis, the variations of the aerobic bacterial portion of the total autoflora within sample collection sites were analyzed as shown in Figure 8-7. This analysis shows that the frequency with which recovery day values lie outside the preflight range is similar for the 10-day Apollo 14 mission and the three Skylab missions. More specifically, the total number of viable cells recovered was frequently higher post-flight whereas the number of genera and species decreased in all missions except Skylab 4. Therefore, it is possible to make the following observations concerning recovery of aerobic bacteria following these space flights. Values obtained from immediate postflight sample analyses are frequently outside of the established preflight range. When different, these values most often reflect an increase in total number of viable cells and a decrease in the number of different genera and species recovered."

lsda.jsc.nasa.gov...



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 12:53 AM
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reply to post by zazzafrazz
 


Just to clarify. We're talking about bacteria inside the spacecraft. It's a nice environment, if you're a microbe or a fungus.
science.nasa.gov...



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 12:59 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


correct, inside, it grows better...but I cant find anything online about it existing from space external to the craft.
Ill keep looking. Im sure Ive heard something before the India find. Its odd no one can find anything online yet. anyhooo

[edit on 22-3-2009 by zazzafrazz]



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 01:11 AM
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Originally posted by zazzafrazz
reply to post by Phage
 


correct, inside, it grows better...but I cant find anything online about it existing from space external to the craft.
Ill keep looking. Im sure Ive heard something before the India find. Its odd no one can find anything online yet. anyhooo

[edit on 22-3-2009 by zazzafrazz]


Im sure there is no mention of bacteria thriving in space ultra violet rays can kill everything. Unless of course they live in meteorites thats still up for debate. Even the bacteria india found is still protected by earths atmosphere. Its just alot higher than we thought possible.



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 01:22 AM
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Can we stop with the sensationalist, deceptive news article headlines already?

Everytime curiosity gets the better of me and I actually bother to check out one of these "Aliens found", "Extraterrestrial life discovered", "Green men on Earth!", etc. stories they turn out to be nothing more than a new species of bacteria being discovered.

I mean seriously, we already have enough false-advertising in the real world.

[edit on 22/3/09 by The Godfather of Conspira]



posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 05:51 PM
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reply to post by Akezzon
 


I agree with your assessment. We wonder if it is common for asteroids and other debris raining down on earth to contain genetic material.. We don't know for sure because we can't feasibly analyze everything. But we do know that science has confirmed the existence of genetic material in some of this debris that constantly rains down on our planet. The following is one of the most famous examples..

From Discover Magazine:
Confirmed: 1969 Meteorite Brought Genetic Building Blocks From Space



In June astrobiologists announced they had found a key component of genetic material within a meteorite. The discovery supports the idea that asteroid bombardment four billion years ago may have jump-started the emergence of life.

Zita Martins of Imperial College London and her colleagues identified the organic molecules in the 4.6-billion-year-old Mur­chison meteorite, a carbon-rich rock that fell to Earth in Australia in 1969. Earlier researchers had detected subunits of DNA and RNA, called nucleobases, in the meteor­ite. But nobody could be sure whether the nucleobases were extraterrestrial or were simply soil contaminants.


Click HERE for their official announcement of this discovery in PDF format.

-ChriS




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