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Teens tie £56 camera to balloon, send it to edge of space & capture stunning images of Earth

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posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 01:20 PM
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Hi, you've got to look at these pics...


Teenagers with a £56 camera and latex balloon have managed to take stunning pictures from 20 miles above Earth.

Proving that you don't need Google's billions or the BBC weather centre's resources, the four Spanish students managed to send a camera-operated weather balloon into the stratosphere.

Taking atmospheric readings and photographs, the Meteotek team of IES La Bisbal school in Spanish Catalonia completed their incredible experiment at the end of February this year.





Astronomic achievement: An image of the stratosphere taken by the group of four Spanish students by tying a camera to a balloon and sending it to the edge of space








Nasa take note: The digital camera attached to the weather balloon that snapped the incredible images


Full Article Here

Absolutely astounding ... these people were able to take these pics with an inexpensive camera ... why does nasa spend billions then on cameras that take the same pictures? i have no clue ... haha ... must look at the pictures though




posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by baseball101


Absolutely astounding ... these people were able to take these pics with an inexpensive camera ... why does nasa spend billions then on cameras that take the same pictures? i have no clue ... haha ... must look at the pictures though


Because if NASA could do what they do for a fraction of the cost, they'd only get a fraction of the funding. And they know it.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by drwizardphd
 


I think that statement rings true quite a bit. Nasa has some very deep pockets and most of their stuff is alot of flash and awe vs actually building something that is usefull. What we see is only the cover show.

I would love to see what kind of black budget projects they've been working on all these years, just to get a taste at what my grand children might possible experience.

To the kids who came up with the idea, I'm sure NASA will be in contact for a job at some point or another. Nothing like taking a great idea and squashing it!

~Keeper



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 01:39 PM
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I was so excited reading this, I posted the same thread, a couple hours ago.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

It's amazing!



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 01:44 PM
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Amazing pictures. Truly inspiring.


Originally posted by baseball101
why does nasa spend billions then on cameras that take the same pictures?


s.ngm.com...

Because these aren't the same pictures.

You are using this news to vent your personal frustrations at NASA, it is out of place imo.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 01:49 PM
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Wow, that is amazing. The quality kicks the crap outta some of those fuzzy black and white nasa shots. a flag and a star for you.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 01:53 PM
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Hi,
Are you telling me, they only took 3 pictures?

Is there more pictures?



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 01:54 PM
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Sick... The worlds space agencies must have been using cheap webcams to take pictures of the moon


This from an 56 dollar camera...



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 02:00 PM
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No, about $112.00.
I had the same idea, except using a kite instead.
But one problem, I have never actually done it.

And kites crash.
I would also need a camera that would takes pics in timed intervals.


jra

posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 07:35 PM
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While I think this is a really neat accomplishment and those are some really nice pics. But I'd like to address your statement below.


Originally posted by baseball101
Absolutely astounding ... these people were able to take these pics with an inexpensive camera ... why does nasa spend billions then on cameras that take the same pictures? i have no clue ... haha ... must look at the pictures though


Firstly, NASA doesn't spend millions on cameras, let alone billions. Secondly, NASA uses consumer cameras for missions on the Shuttle and on the ISS. But when it comes to probes that are sent to other planets, I don't think your average consumer camera would be able to handle the conditions or requirements.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 07:43 PM
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Quite an accomplishment.

Goes to show what a little imagination, some work and maybe even a little bit of luck will do.


I am concerned about a balloon lifting equipment transiting typical altitudes that jetliners use in their flights.

Did the students have permission or whatever is required from the European or Spanish agencies similar to the FAA in the US?


I note that amateur rocket clubs in the US have to get permission from the FAA to fly their rockets.
Especially so if they are expected to reach 10,000 feet.



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 09:10 PM
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This kind of activity has been going on for a while, check out the efforts of the Kentucky Space Program-

www.kentuckyspace.com...
www.kentuckyspace.com...

If you google "pongsats" you'll find even more info on amateur space exploration.



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