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Preparing for Sit-X: Why?

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posted on Mar, 15 2009 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by waterdoctor
 
Yes, i have an aunt and uncle that live in Colville. Very nice country. Not very far from where i'm at. It's been a while since i was last there, but the people i met were friendly so it would be a good place to be. Except for the fact it's in the fascist state of Washington.




posted on Mar, 15 2009 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by waterdoctor
To Northern Raider

The Company I work for is putting in a 300 mw wind farm on the Nevada Idaho boarder. It is not as nearly as nice of country as where Anuubis is at but you would not be very far from it.

[edit on 15-3-2009 by waterdoctor]


Good Gawd Almighty 300MW jeez I'm jelous, I'm struggling to get planning permits for three WFS up here and the total output is less than 100 MW, All the middle class semi retired prats who care more about the view from their window than they do about securing a clean green energy supply for their grand children really pee me off.



posted on Mar, 15 2009 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by Nirgal

Originally posted by Northern Raider
It appears the survivalist state of Idaho and the survivalist County of Durham share many common values, pity they dont reach as far as Washington or London.


Oi! I resemble that remark!

Unfortunately I cannot sit up on the same moral high-ground as NR and Anuubis. I've done some pretty bloody stupid things to myself in the past and have now come to the conclusion that my time is finite, therefore I would like to do as much as I can to extend that time.

Am I frightened of dying? Oh yes, yes I am, definately. That is why I am trying to take measures to extend it for as long as possible.


But you arec planning on getting as as soon as you can I believe ?, you you dont count, your part of the enlightened not the sheeple.



posted on Mar, 15 2009 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by Northern Raider
 


NIMBY's will be the death of us. Also we are planing and signed papers on a 250 MW thermal solar unit.

This is an indication of how companies also plan for disruptions. Had to keep this on topic don't you know.



posted on Mar, 15 2009 @ 04:10 PM
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Originally posted by waterdoctor
reply to post by Northern Raider
 


NIMBY's will be the death of us. Also we are planing and signed papers on a 250 MW thermal solar unit.

This is an indication of how companies also plan for disruptions. Had to keep this on topic don't you know.


Campaigning the NIMBYs is what the energy companies hire me for, I help communities get the most benefits from WF schemes via grants and CDFS etc. Currently I'm working for a French and German set of power companies , but a few US ones keep trying to hire me, turn em down because they dont take the community commitment seriously.

I like to see the developers put about $3000 a MW generated per year back into the communities who host the WFS, it works well in the UK and EU but not so well in the US.

[edit on 15-3-2009 by Northern Raider]



posted on Mar, 15 2009 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by Anuubis
 


We will be up there in May to see if we can work something out. Seemed to me that the folks in that part of Washington did not think to highly of the people on the coast. Kind of like us and the folks down in Lost Wages. Sorry that is what we up here call Las Vegas.


CX

posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 07:46 PM
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I prepare because i do not want to find myself in a situation where myself or my loved ones have suffered because of going without some seriously basic items.

I don't know why, but water is a big thing for me right now. If i'm down the shops, i throw another 5ltr bottle in the trolley. I now have enough to know that if anything happened, me and my girls are sorted for a while.

I almost find it embarrassing to think that if anything bad happend in this country, i could not look after myself or the kids.

Is it really that hard to learn a few skills and stock a few things to prepare?

CX.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 08:28 PM
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I prepare because I chose a long time ago that ''I will chose my own demise''

That and I couldnt stand to bear if in a given situation my wife or family look to me for a plan or correct measure of action..I couldnt just say to them or myself, SHOWS OVER GUY'S...

[edit on 17-3-2009 by Redpillblues]



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 11:30 PM
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I only prepare what would make the most sense.

Start easy. I live in a VERY cold climate. If we had to escape from a fire in the middle of winter, you could very easily be frost bit in no time and on your way to severe hyperthermia.

So I have fire extinguishers. And a fire ladder for the second floor. I've practiced with my children how to get out of the house.

I have a sling that would allow me to tie two of my children onto me to climb down the ladder.

I have a bug out pack with things that would allow us to be outside (or if it was really a bad fire) walk away in the middle of the night. One that I can toss out the window.

Is this over kill? Well, we probably will never be in a fire.

But I still check my fire alarm don't I? Logically, surviving a fire to die in the cold is a small improvement.

That's where I started. I've got a three day "kit" (except the honey bucket, which I really have to get on getting). Is that overkill? Well, since my government suggests it even and even has an Emergency Preparedness Week I don't think so.

Is making plans for how we will get the kids, who, and where we'll go or meet in different possible scenarios a silly idea? Is knowing the local potential sitX silly? Hey I live in a tornado alley. Pretending that isn't so is not smart.

Knowing that communications will be down, and at least 4 of us will be in situations where we are likely to be herded during the day and we are all in different places. Well, the Canadian Red Cross doesn't seem to think so. They even have a card you can print out so that you can put it in your wallets about where you plan on meeting if you have to evacuate and you aren't together. Close by, nearby city, faraway city.

After we move, I'll be moving onto the next "project." Which would be water storage for a month or more for my family and a food store that can last three seasons. Overkill? Maybe. But major recessions have happened before. I live in an area with a VERY short growing season, and not a lot of water. A "year without summer" has happened before. While where I live is out of the way, we have an inflated idea of food availability because in the event of shortages they send things here because we have lots of money. (as a population)

Have I tried to garden on just rainwater before? Yes. Kind of sucks where I live. When I start putting in seeds for storage, I'll be sure to pick the most hardy and easy to grow first just because of that. I also plan my landscaping on being pretty, perenial and edible. Just in case I'll need it.

Is this fear? Maybe somewhat. But a healthy fear of known problems is a survival trait. And I don't plan on dying easy. And I certainly plan on my children living a good long time.

I don't plan on putting a bunker in my back yard. But I have looked at how to survive a nuclear event. I am a child of my times. I'm only in mid thirties, but I assure you that even in high school we still practiced how to get to the school underground dug out dirt basement in case of a nuclear event or an air raid. Really. It also served part time as an area for us to do running laps during the winter for P.E.

I am not fatalistic. The fatalist who thinks that planning for potential problems is whacky, should also tear out their fire alarm. Accept your fate, and all that.

OH - and am I hoping for all hell to break loose? No. I am not a sociopath. I like they system of government we have. I like the type of society we've created and maintain. I think that it is the best of what has come about so far. (so far). Do I do this for religious values? No.

It really as simple as simple plans for survival. Most of human existence on this planet has not been easy. Bad things happen sometimes. I have an investment in my genes' continued place in the Universe.

[edit on 2009/3/17 by Aeons]



posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 10:17 AM
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Aeons- very interesting post!! May I ask, what is in your 3 day kit? Because where I live can get REALLY cold in the winter....


Thanks~



posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 11:00 AM
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Originally posted by Northern Raider

Originally posted by Anuubis
reply to post by Northern Raider
 
Now if that is not a good reason for us to prepare, then i don't know what is.

It wouldn't matter if i do, if i didn't have her.

[edit on 15-3-2009 by Anuubis]

It appears the survivalist state of Idaho and the survivalist County of Durham share many common values, pity they dont reach as far as Washington or London.


Its reached THIS part of London anyways NR, I may not have children to worry about ( God forbid should I ever have any to worry about) I have enough to worry about the rest of my family , most importantly my Wife, then my loafer twin brother, my mercenary mother ( not that she fires guns , but she's always after a quick quid)
, an elderly grandmother and *spit* a mother-in-law.
Of course I'd have to look after the wife first, but then I'd have to do as much as I could for others. And if I prepare and then get caught up in whatever SitX happens , even if I die then I'd be happy knowing at least I tried to do something, not just sitting on my fat a*se waiting for the Government to bumble its way to me.
Better to be prepared and ready, than expecting something and not have anything to show for it. and then die whilst pondering I Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda.



posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 11:04 AM
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[

Its reached THIS part of London anyways NR, I may not have children to worry about ( God forbid should I ever have any to worry about) I have enough to worry about the rest of my family , most importantly my Wife, then my loafer twin brother, my mercenary mother ( not that she fires guns , but she's always after a quick quid)
, an elderly grandmother and *spit* a mother-in-law.
Of course I'd have to look after the wife first, but then I'd have to do as much as I could for others. And if I prepare and then get caught up in whatever SitX happens , even if I die then I'd be happy knowing at least I tried to do something, not just sitting on my fat a*se waiting for the Government to bumble its way to me.
Better to be prepared and ready, than expecting something and not have anything to show for it. and then die whilst pondering I Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda.


Dont worry, I'll just keep nagging you until you move your wife outside the M25
NR



posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 11:41 AM
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A wise person always prepare, even in every day life. Here is a situation
that my wife and I had been apart of. My anniversary was coming up and
I wanted to take my wife to a concert, since she never has been to one.
So like most people I prepared for the event by looking for the best
affordable tickets, best place to park, weather, and so on. The weather
was to be nice, high seventies, but I wanted to make sure that we would
be comfortable so I bought us two water fan bottles.

When we arrived at the concert the temperature was just right and for a
second I thought about leaving the fan bottles in the car. This was an
open concert by the way. Good thing I took the bottles, because when we
took our seats the temperature was unbearable. The seats were made of
metal, concrete everywhere, and the sun beaming straight on us. It was
extremely hot with people sweating all around us. Well, those water bottle
fans came in extremely handy and our body temperature was kept in
checked.


As for the other people, they had to tough it out since the concert did not
sell the fans. I bought mine at Wal-Mart. There were soo many people
asking where we got the fans and even offered to pay us more than what
we bought them for.

Just goes to tell ya, that it is better to be prepared than not.



posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 12:12 PM
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Originally posted by Cariaddi
Aeons- very interesting post!! May I ask, what is in your 3 day kit? Because where I live can get REALLY cold in the winter....
Thanks~


I have a fairly routine one with about the supplies that you'd find listed on the Red Cross sites.

I've supplemented it with those heat reflective blankets and sleeping bags. Wool socks for everyone, two pairs so that an extra can be used as mitts if necessary. These are just woolies that I've rescued from my husband who uses them for work. We just rotated out a set early for the bag. Thick wool sweaters, and rain suits. Fleece hats for everyone.

I have started keeping an extra set of current sized shoes in everyone's room (except my husband now that I think about it....I'll have to fix that.) At worst, everyone can get out and we can throw the shoes out the window if there is an emergency. The extra shoes are just ones that I picked up at the thrift store. No need to keep expensive brand new shoes around for an emergency.

While this might not be super warm - it is a sure bet warmer than barefeet in -35C before windchill.

Under their beds I keep extra winter gear. So it is quickly accessible. But not in the BOB so in an emergency that required top speed it wouldn't be coming.

Additionals - Diapers. Husband meds. Hand and feet warmers - those little packs that you break the seal inside and they warm up for 8 hours.

I also had to add an extra set of everything because most family BOB are made for 4 person families and I have a five person family.

I've put all of this into a bag that is a back pack/roller style bag that can be used as a cooler. So it is insulated. This way if I need to throw one of those little hand heaters in to keep water freezing, it'll be more likely to work. Plus the bag can be converted to other uses if the evacuation becomes longer term. (food storage)



posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 12:34 PM
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I started prepping for basic emergencies like earthquake/ floods (as I live in an earthquake area and I am situated less than 40 feet above sea level). It's not much different really adding to a survival plan in the event of something really big. Anyone can set aside some basic emergency supplies and food items easily and fairly cheaply.

Living day to day in quivering fear isn't really why most get into preparedness. It's practical to be honest. Earthquake zones are all over, hurricanes, tornadoes, flooding, rock slides and mud slides....we all live in areas that can be affected by a variety of situations regardless of scale or dynamic.

Taking responsibility for one's own safety in the event of an emergency is really doing our society a BIG favor. The more people prepared the less burden on emergency agencies and infrastructure in the event of even a small disaster.

It's not just running around hoarding guns and ammo and razor wire. It's stocking extra water, food, clothing, batteries, utensils, first aid supplies, food....etc in a compact kit for many like myself.

Most people have insurance....why? Just in case it's needed. Same reason for emergency preparedness.



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