It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

My Dad, Vietnam, and an Average Age of 52

page: 1
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 06:48 AM
link   
Just something totally weird I noticed, but a little background first:

My father served with the 9th Infantry Division in Dong Tom, Viet Nam, 1968-1970.

He was was in good health( at least physically) after the war, but in the late 80's/early 90's, his right thigh muscle totally deteriorated for no good reason.

At this time, after seeing the doctor, he applied for Agent Orange Benefits, and was turned down.

In 1997, he died of a brain enorism.

Now comes the strange part: He is buried at Lincoln National Cemetary, in Wilmington, Illinois. After we visit him, we usually walk around the other graves, looking at the names.

What I noticed, is that, on average, every single Viet Nam Vet died around the average age of 52!

Not saying this is the norm, just the average. Most I saw were born in the 40's, and died in the late 90's/early 2000's.

Comparing them to the WWII vets, there is an average age at death difference of 30 years.

I know the war was very demanding, both physically and mentally, but do you think that 'Agent Orange" was a leading factor in the deaths at a young age of our Viet Nam vets??

Or could it be that some other chemical agent, or experimental drug was used on new recruits/draftees at the time??

I'm on a mission.......


peace






[Edited on 19-4-2004 by John bull 1]




posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 07:31 AM
link   
Quite interesting.

It's something that should be looked into.

Perhaps they are putting something in the water. (Sorry for the Macabre commentary, I feel your pain. I've lost some very close to me.)



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 07:51 AM
link   
Interesting observations nathraq.

This is certainly a topic that deserves more reasearch.



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 07:56 AM
link   
Agent Orange Website
Agent Orange was the code name for a herbicide developed for the military, primarily for use in tropical climates. Although the genesis of the product goes back to the 1940's, serious testing for military applications did not begin until the early 1960's.

The purpose of the product was to deny an enemy cover and concealment in dense terrain by defoliating trees and shrubbery where the enmy could hide. The product "Agent Orange" (a code name for the orange band that was used to mark the drums it was stored in, was principally effective against broad-leaf foliage, such as the dense jungle-like terrain found in Southeast Asia.


Become familiar with Agent Orange and the Health of Our Vietnam Veterans
Approximately 20 million gallons of herbicides were used in Vietnam between 1962 and 1971 to remove unwanted plant life and leaves which otherwise provided cover for enemy forces during the Vietnam Conflict. Shortly following their military service in Vietnam, some veterans reported a variety of health problems and concerns which some of them attributed to exposure to Agent Orange or other herbicides. The Department of Veterans Affairs has developed a comprehensive program to respond to these medical problems and concerns. The principal elements of this program include quality healthcare services, disability compensation for veterans with service-connected illnesses, scientific research and outreach and education.

The Story of Agent Orange
This never-ending legacy of the war in Vietnam has created among many veterans and their families deep feelings of mistrust of the U.S. government for its lack of honesty in studying the effects of the rainbow herbicides, particularly Agent Orange, and its conscious effort to cover up information and rig test results with which it does not agree.

You can find many more links by doing a simple search.



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 08:06 AM
link   
We should also look into what effect it has had on the people of vietnam and the environment where it was used. What effect has it had or is still having on ther environment?



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 08:17 AM
link   
nathraq, first off, I am very sorry to hear about your dad. Please accept my condolences. There are seven members of my extended family who served in Vietnam, all born prior to 1950. Only one has died, and that was from a fairly rare cancer. He was a Marine, 1st Division. The rest are reasonably healthy for men their ages. Only three of the survivors were "on the ground" while there. They were in the Marines as well; the others were in the Navy. So, it looks like at least some of those who were in Vietnam got out OK, physically at least. If you ask any of them they will tell you how lucky they are.

I have access to a lot of statistical health data, especially on neuromuscular diseases, so if you have some specific questions, u2u me and I will see what I can dig up for you.

regards,



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 08:18 AM
link   
Vietnam vets die at a variety of ages -- and I don't know why some felt the effects of Agent Orange more than others. My dad's still alive, long after the age of 50, and the VFW posts have quite a few older Vietnam vets.

I think that a lot of research has been done about this, and followup needs to be done on it and on the Gulf War Syndrome as well.

(but I'm way too brain fried to think about it at the moment.)



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 11:23 AM
link   
Maybe we should tell Amuk. He may be in trouble.

Sorry for the joke, it's really not a funny topic, but I like to pick on him.



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 05:20 PM
link   
He is 84 now, living in a nursing home with senile dementia. Vietnam Vet's took a lot and my father in law has problems to this day because of agent orange, breaks out in hives every so often and they are very painfull. The Gov definately knows what is going on but I am sure they were assured by some corporate jack ass back then that this stuff wasn't going to hurt people, just the jungle. The company who made the stuff should be punished as much or more as the government.



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 05:27 PM
link   
Another thing you might want to look into would be the average age of post-war NVA/ARVN deaths. Round out your statistics and all.

DE



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 05:35 PM
link   
My Father was born in 35, and died last year, from Heart Diease, Kidney Failuer , and Lung Cancer.

The Cancer was his fault, but the others were agent orange, in fact he was approved for Agent Orange Benifits because of this and was proved by the VA.

THere is a very large portion of Guys near the front line where alot of Orange was dropped and death between the last 5 years. I will try to find the stats I saw about the ave amount of death of vets to Normal the last 5 years. Its not about age its about the time you were exposed. Just alot of people are around the same age in these groups, My dad was a 2 tour MSG so a little older than most



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 06:19 PM
link   
my father served in vietnam from 1967 to 1968 and was in the first air calvary (first of the ninth) and spent alot of time in the central highlands....i was born while he was in nam and when he came back my mom had no less than 11 miscarriages..he has suffered from high blood pressure off and on and i would venture to guess that agent orange caused this and probably destroyed his sperm....my mother always blamed herself but i always thought it was probably my dads exposure to agent orange... i just thank god that he came back mentally fine and that he came back at all ...He is now currently 57 and in pretty good health ....i will also mention my father was completely deaf and they still made him go to nam and he was personally pardoned by Bobby Kennedy from serving in Nam but by the time my grandmother received the pardon...because she was the one who went of her way to have him sent back...my dad was short on time and stayed for the rest of his tour...
Vietnam screwed up a lot of guys...physically and mentally or both....it makes me somewhat bitter now to know that vietnam was just another plan of the global elites plans to rule the world thru manipulated conflicts....
God bless your father

[Edited on 19-4-2004 by watcheroftheskies]



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 06:25 PM
link   

Originally posted by KrazyJethro
Maybe we should tell Amuk. He may be in trouble.

Sorry for the joke, it's really not a funny topic, but I like to pick on him.




I turn 54 on the 27th and a buddy of mine, my chopper pilot, is 54 but I do know several that have died from agent orange and wounds suffered during the war.

Other than a few painful scars I am fine.

Whoops...... I turn 54 I was born in 50. Thats what you get for posting in a hurry


[Edited on 20-4-2004 by Amuk]



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 06:39 PM
link   
War is literally toxic. It is reprehensible that governments abandon those who were prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice. My heart goes out to you, too many vets find the hardest battle is with their own government when the shooting stops. Depleted uranium is sure to be the next agent orange.



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 09:10 PM
link   

Originally posted by Amuk

Originally posted by KrazyJethro
Maybe we should tell Amuk. He may be in trouble.

Sorry for the joke, it's really not a funny topic, but I like to pick on him.




I turn 50 on the 27th and a buddy of mine, my chopper pilot, is 54 but I do know several that have died from agent orange and wounds suffered during the war.

Other than a few painful scars I am fine.


Thank god. I don't know what we'd do without all your Libertarian antics around here.

I'd certainly be a lot more dull.




posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 09:14 PM
link   
My father is in his 60's and still going pretty good. Served in the 101st Airborne in 68-69 (1 year) and then returned to the 4th Infantry 69-70 (1 year). He was a Staff Sgt. and worked with typewriters and stuff. About the only thing that happened to him in Vietnam was shrapnel wounds and a back injury because his convoy hit a land mine and he fell off the truck.

[Edited on 19-4-2004 by pyxsul]



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 09:16 PM
link   
I'm going with Byrd's observations on this.
My father served and did three tours in Vietnam, is still alive and eagerly kicking at 67, and thats with him going in the US Army at age 16, having a lung removed at 18, due to TB.




seekerof



posted on Apr, 20 2004 @ 06:13 AM
link   

Originally posted by Byrd
Vietnam vets die at a variety of ages -- and I don't know why some felt the effects of Agent Orange more than others. My dad's still alive, long after the age of 50, and the VFW posts have quite a few older Vietnam vets.




I'm going back to the cemetary this weekend. If it's not that out of taste, I'm going to take pictures of the graves I mentioned, and also pictures of the vets graves from other wars as a comparison. I wasn't saying every Viet Nam vet is going to pass in his 50's. It was just odd that so many of the soldiers buried there, who happened to be Viet Nam vets, have died at an early age.

Or maybe it's just an Illinois thing, hehe



posted on Apr, 20 2004 @ 06:22 AM
link   

Originally posted by Byrd
Vietnam vets die at a variety of ages -- and I don't know why some felt the effects of Agent Orange more than others. My dad's still alive, long after the age of 50, and the VFW posts have quite a few older Vietnam vets.



Byrd,

What did your dad do while in Viet Nam? My brother (55 now) is still alive, but he was a chopper pilot. Could this trend be more in the infantry? Down where the yucky stuff was?

Just a thought.



posted on Apr, 20 2004 @ 06:59 AM
link   
He was a grunt, 9th Infantry Division.

As with most vets, he really never talked about it. When we were kids, we used to ask him all about the war, but he would only answer with short remarks.

"Did you ever kill anyone?"(typical child question)

"I don't know", he would reply.

Apart from some small pieces of shrapnel, which left little green dots on his chest and back(looked like small tattoos), he wasn't hurt. But again, he wouldn't talk about it. I also remember him waking up at the slightest sound. He never talked about nightmares or anything, but maybe he had them too, I don't know.

As I said, all respect for those vets.......



new topics

top topics



 
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join