Did Nazis invent the Atomic Bomb?

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posted on Apr, 16 2009 @ 09:30 AM
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there was not fighting or else going on there, and the red cross trucks were german red cross trucks being driven by americans.
Look it up you will find what i mean




posted on Apr, 16 2009 @ 09:50 AM
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Originally posted by Pakd-on-mystery
there was not fighting or else going on there, and the red cross trucks were german red cross trucks being driven by americans.
Look it up you will find what i mean


The area was still under military occupation, so military trucks being there is not a surprise. As for German trucks driven by American, what is strange about that?



posted on Apr, 16 2009 @ 03:17 PM
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reply to post by Carlthulhu
 




After securing neutron-moderator technology and scientists from the Nazis (in return for asylum and immunity?), it would have been in the Americans best interest to keep this transaction a secret!



It matters not much what people say or think about the Nazi or Japanese A-bomb effort; the unassailable fact is the UNITED STATES made three of them in 1945. We tested the three - 2 uranium, one plutonium - and all three worked! Germany has never made an a-bomb nor has Japan.

Read my signature.



posted on Apr, 16 2009 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by Pakd-on-mystery
 


Hey there pakd

I read the story about that place 12 or more years ago, in an english version of a german magazine.
So what info is there on SIII,
Do you know what it was used for?
Has it ever been unsealed or explored.
At the time of the article the german government had just again denied requests for permission to explore it, by historians...

The story is such a "good one" that the basic notion was co-opted for the plot line of a PC game by valve.



posted on Apr, 16 2009 @ 07:04 PM
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Originally posted by donwhite

It matters not much what people say or think about the Nazi or Japanese A-bomb effort; the unassailable fact is the UNITED STATES made three of them in 1945. We tested the three - 2 uranium, one plutonium - and all three worked! Germany has never made an a-bomb nor has Japan.



Of course, somewhere on the internet there will be people who disagree. . . .

nuclear weapons don't exist

Which gives me the excuse to quote one of the more ridiculous claims I've seen:


Of course, the nuclear atom is a myth on top of a myth. Atoms themselves do not exist at all. It is a false theory of Pythagoras's students Leucippus which Pythagoras learned from secret sects in India when he visited there in the sixth century BC at the behest of the jews in Babylon to spread the worst heresies of the hindus in the West.





posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 12:29 AM
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Originally posted by mdiinican
reply to post by Pakd-on-mystery
 


How do you differentiate an atomic bunker from a regular bunker? The fact that their cities were being pounded night and day by strategic bombers, some carrying huge bombs meant to penetrate hardened structures (like the tallboy and grand slam bombs) might have had something to do with the motivations for building bunkers.


Well for one thing the thickness of the walls, if they are made of concrete. Regular bomb shelters have concrete walls between 3 - 6 feet thick of reinforced concrete.

A shelter designed to shield radiation would have outer walls 12 feet thick.

A nuclear shelter often has lead lined walls to help shield against radiation. A shelter designed for conventional weapons has no need for lead lining.

A nuclear shelter would have air tight doors. Those used at US missile sites have two massive doors weighing tons each. They also have massive shock absorbers designed to cushion the interior from the shock of an atomic blast.

I don't know if the Nazi shelters went to such extraordinary lengths but I have been to Germany and I have seen many leftover shelters from WWII. I would say that most of these looked like conventional shelters, no air tight doors, no lead lining, and most did not have exterior walls 12 feet thick (a few did).

I don't know about those in Berlin designed for the upper echelon of the Nazi regime. I would not be too surprised to learn that they had all of what I mentioned.



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 12:37 AM
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Originally posted by Gawdzilla
"Child never born, mother never pregnant." That's the results of the investigation team sent to check the German bomb program.


Yes that was the statement and now we know that it was blatently false.

The Nazis had a bomb program and tried to build a crude reactor (not that our design was much more sophisticated).

So, we now know that the mother was at least messing around and may have been pregnant.

We also know that the Nazis sent at least 20 shipments of U-235 to Japan. The last one was the U-234 incident that surrendered to the US after Germany was defeated.



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 07:44 AM
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reply to post by lunarminer
 




The Nazis had a bomb program and tried to build a crude reactor. We also know that the Nazis sent at least 20 shipments of U-235 to Japan. The last one was the U-234 incident that surrendered to the US after Germany was defeated.



A bomb program is just that, a program!

NO, we don’t know the Germans shipped TWENTY shipments of U235 to Japan. (Unless you are talking MICROgrams).

We think we know the Germans shipped uranium ore at least one time, in TWENTY individual containers of PURIFIED Uranium to Japan. Yellow cake. 99.7% U238, 0.3% U235. That would have been very helpful to Japan which had no source of uranium ore. It was most likely for industrial purposes and research but definitely it was NOT for making bombs.

It is not so much that we discovered the atomic bomb secrets, it was that we and we alone had developed the technological process to enrich uranium to weapons garde. We had the industrial and financial resources to do the job in the time frame we needed it done.

In fact, we used TWO methods to make a bomb. The U235 method at Oak Ridge and the plutonium (neutron bombarded uranium) at Hanford. BOTH worked but Oak Ridge made 2 bombs to the 1 from Hanford.

The 2nd great hurdle was how to make a bomb. When you reach the critical mass the chain reaction begins and cannot be halted. In a few nano-seconds, the whole thing has reacted and you have the atomic bomb!

But the catch is HOW to carry 2 pieces of metal (uranium is a metal) far enough apart not to equal a clinical mass, and then, at the moment of your choice, to put the two together into ONE. You slam them together, but slam TOO hard and the metal shatters and you have a pile of uranium trash, but NOT hard enough and you still have 2 separate pieces. Like Goldilocks, it has to be done JUST right! And that is not easy.

Hey! Don't forget when the Germans invaded Russia in 1941, a fair part of their artillery and supply wagons were HORSE-DRAWN!


[edit on 4/17/2009 by donwhite]



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 07:45 AM
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reply to post by lunarminer
 


"Yes that was the statement and now we know that it was blatently false. "

Your source for this information, please?



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by donwhite
 


Here we go again. If you would do a bit of research then you would find that the uranium shipments to Japan started in 1942 and we have the shipping manifests that prove this. So, point one has been established.

The uranium on the U-234 was in 9 inch long lead cylinders and were labeled U-235. This is how you transport enriched uranium. Yellow cake requires no such precautions. You can ship 700 pounds of yellow cake in 50 gallon drums in fact that is done all the time.

So, what was on the U-234? I doubt very much that it was yellowcake and the first written reports called the stuff "uranium metal". That does not sound like yellowcake.

Several sources that I have seen clearly state that much of the uranium used in the little boy nuke came from the U-234. If that is true, then the uranium must have been is a form that was much closer to weapons grade U-235, there would not have been enough time to process it from the yellowcake form.

You and others have continued to read into the official reports that the U-235 was yellowcake. That is not anywhere in the official reports.



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by Gawdzilla
 


I have posted half a dozen links already on this thread.

We know that the Germans built a crude reactor.

We know that they had heavy water.

We know that they were shipping uranium to Japan. Actual uranium metal, not yellowcake.

We know that Heisenberg was working on a bomb design.

Add it up and mother was screwing around.



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by lunarminer
 


"Add it up and mother was screwing around. "

But not pregnant. And not likely to conceive. Alles klar, ja?



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 11:59 AM
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reply to post by Gawdzilla
 


Here is a very detailed summary of the Nazi uranium story. Enjoy.

http:\\www.missilegate.com/rfz/swaz/chapter3.htm



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by Gawdzilla
 


We don't know that.

What we do know is that the official history has told us that the Nazis didn't have a bomb program.

We know that is false.

Check out the link that I mention in the above post.



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 12:10 PM
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Originally posted by lunarminer
reply to post by Gawdzilla
 


Here is a very detailed summary of the Nazi uranium story. Enjoy.

http:\\www.missilegate.com/rfz/swaz/chapter3.htm


And you consider this proof? How so?



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by lunarminer
 


a very interesting read you got there


What I dont understand is how so many people cannot bring themselves to believe that the axis was on the verge of an atomic bomb.


The discrepancies between the mahattan projects output and its inventory is one that was noticed early on.
The manhattan project was under immense pressure to produce results i order to continue recieving funding.
It wasnt the only secret development project in the US, my ex father in law
worked at a secret chemical devlopment factory in texas, that became dow's texas operations after the wasr.



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 02:04 PM
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reply to post by Gawdzilla
 


I didn't say it "proof". You asked for a source, I gave you a source. Did you read it?

If not, have a nice day.



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks09
 


I think that there are a variety of reasons why people don't want to accept the idea that we were months ahead of the German and Japanese programs and not the "years" that is part of the official story.

Here are a couple that I think helps to explain their reluctance.

1.) To admit that the Germans and Japanese had atomic bomb programs suggests that the development of the atomic bomb was inevitable. If we had not done it, they would have.

2.) If the enemy had an atomic weapons program then the dropping of the atomic bomb was completely justified. No need for the moralistic handwringing that has been going on in the US for the past 60 years. I read several sources that stated that the Japanes enrichment program had centrifuges set up in Hiroshima. That would explain why that city was chosen as the target for our first bomb. A nuclear strike on their enrichment facilities would certainly slow their development down. We know that the US knew about their program because we dropped a letter to their nuclear scientists along with an instrument package at Hiroshima a few days after the bombing. Very interesting.

3.) A Nazi bomb program means that the official history of the last days of WWII is wrong. So wrong that it casts doubt on other historical "facts". Like, who solved the critical problems of the US atomic bomb projects? I found one source that showed German Luftwaffe markings on Fat Man. If that is true, then everything else we know is wrong.

4.) It's just too scary for some to comprehend that we came very close to losing WWII.

5.) It requires people to re-examine their assumptions about the US, the Allies, Japan, Germany, etc. Some people are set in their opinions and cannot change.



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 02:38 PM
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Originally posted by punkinworks09
reply to post by lunarminer
 


The discrepancies between the mahattan projects output and its inventory is one that was noticed early on.
The manhattan project was under immense pressure to produce results i order to continue recieving funding.
It wasnt the only secret development project in the US, my ex father in law
worked at a secret chemical devlopment factory in texas, that became dow's texas operations after the wasr.


Yes, the sudden availability of enough U-235 to make a bomb is one of those facts that is hard to ignore. Why was the uranium bomb never tested? The simple answer is that we didn't have enough U-235 to waste on doing a test. If that is so, then obviously we had more plutonium.

The official story is that we had just enough material for the one test and the two bombs. The true history would suggest however that there were at least 3 bombs present on Tinian Island. We know this since we threatened Japan that the next bomb would be dropped on Tokyo on or around August 20th, 1945. Since the threat is a part of documented history, it seems likely that a third bomb was already on the island. The assembly facility on Tinian was designed to put bombs together in an assembly line fashion. So, it seems likely that we suddenly had a reliable supply of plutonium.

Three is so much of the true history that we don't know.

You are correct that we had hundreds of secret weapons programs during WWII. I think that it is likely that much of the reported 2 billion dollars spent on the Manhattan Project was actually spent on other black ops projects. At the end of the war their budgets were simply added to the total of the Manhattan Project, after all who in Congress is going to argue with the money spent on the program that won the war? That saves the engineers and scientists from the treatment that Howard Hughes got over the "Spruce Goose" project.



posted on Apr, 17 2009 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by lunarminer
 


"The simple answer is that we didn't have enough U-235 to waste on doing a test. If that is so, then obviously we had more plutonium."

The gun-type bomb was rather straight forward. The implosion bomb was trickier. So they tested it. Groves had enough fissile material for three more bombs, IIRC. They just had to build them. Plans were to have nine atomic bombs available for the invasion of Japan, when/if it came off.






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